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Bellfleur
Dec. 15, 2008, 11:21 AM
Thought I would post on the dressage forum because we like to be comfortable. I personally hate being so cold in the winter and yet only like shipping of to Fl maybe for 3 weeks max out of the year.

Have a company via solar energy (very green systems - they also have a portable generator for when the regular power goes out!) that can run piping 12 inches under the base where the heat radiates up through the base to heat your indoor to a comfortable (maybe 40 / 50 degrees) when it is freezing out.

Plusses - minuses ??

Sparky
Dec. 15, 2008, 12:04 PM
Thought I would post on the dressage forum because we like to be comfortable. I personally hate being so cold in the winter and yet only like shipping of to Fl maybe for 3 weeks max out of the year.

Have a company via solar energy (very green systems - they also have a portable generator for when the regular power goes out!) that can run piping 12 inches under the base where the heat radiates up through the base to heat your indoor to a comfortable (maybe 40 / 50 degrees) when it is freezing out.

Plusses - minuses ??

There is a barn in our area that has in-floor radiant heat in the stable part and it works very well. But it is only a couple of inches beneath the concrete, with 3/4" rubber matting on top of that. I'm guessing that if you put pipes 12" under your base, and then add 3-4" of footing, there isn't much heat that's going to get through.

atr
Dec. 15, 2008, 12:11 PM
Last winter I boarded at a barn that had under-floor heating in the barn area and forced air heating in the indoor--it was so nice! Shame the barn manager was completely bats. The heating bill must have been horrifying, though.

If you do it in the barn area, just do the aisles and tack rooms, not under the stalls--cooking horse pee is not the world's greatest smell...

2DogsFarm
Dec. 15, 2008, 05:27 PM
40 degrees Fahrenheit would be the maximum temperature maybe for your heated indoor.
50F is not the best environment for your horse to be working in when outside temps are so much lower - ask your vet.
Heating your indoor that warm is asking for an equine respiratory infection.
In fact I showed in an indoor heated near that and came home 9 times out of 10 with some sort of URI myself.

Suck it up and ride in the cold for your horse's sake.

"Only ship to FL for 3 weeks" < sound of the world's tiniest violin :rolleyes:

Mary in Area 1
Dec. 16, 2008, 12:00 AM
I would think that heating an indoor that way would dry out your footing really fast and cause lots of dust. Yuck.

I LOVE it cold in the indoor so that my horse and I can work hard in the winter and not get so gross and sweaty!

Pony Fixer
Dec. 16, 2008, 12:43 AM
When I lived in PA my trainer's indoor was heated. I don't know what it is called, but basically was those radiant lamp things that hang with a forced air component. Probably not energy efficient, but they were only on when people were using the indoor and it cut the chill (you still had to wear a heavy shirt/sweater or vest).

If you're horses aren't body clipped you could get sweaty horses to deal with if it is too warm...

egontoast
Dec. 16, 2008, 06:30 AM
run piping 12 inches under the base where the heat radiates up through the base to heat your indoor to a comfortable

So , if you are talking about doing this to an existing arena, you have to remove all the footing, dig up the base, lay pipes, then redo the base and footing, all of which is not easy when the walls are up. :eek:

If I wanted to heat my indoor ( and I don't), I'd look for a way that did not involve digging up the base.

siegi b.
Dec. 16, 2008, 08:18 AM
Bellfleur - standard arena footing will not conduct heat. You would have to have a cement base in order to run the pipes in the flooring and you definitely wouldn't want that in an arena. You may have misunderstood the solar guy..... There are different ways to collect solar energy - one is the standard way with solar collectors that are usually located on the roof and directed south. The cheap way is to run piping under ground outside and cover it with a dark, asphalt type base. The dark attracts the heat and holds it and that in turn heats the water that is running in the pipes. A cost-effective way to heat your swimming pool, not your arena.

Good luck with whatever you're doing!

slc2
Dec. 16, 2008, 08:36 AM
Solar shingles all over an arena roof might generate a lot of heat. THe system should cost about 100,000 dollars or more, includes storage batteries, converter, and back up system.

YankeeLawyer
Dec. 16, 2008, 11:03 AM
Bellfleur -- call me re the solar options. I would not run anything under the base for a variety of reasons, including the fact that I agree with Siegi that the heat will not radiate through the footing and I would be very reluctant to allow any contractor who is not well-versed in arena footing issues to start messing with my arena.

But, I have looked into converting my farm to solar and there may be some good options for heating your arena that way. It is pricey but there are tax and other incentives that can help offset a good bit of the cost.

bluemoonfarms
Dec. 17, 2008, 10:09 PM
I have a radiant heat system in my indoor and it works great. However, it uses propane not solar. I keep the temp at 40 degrees and do not ride the horses in there when it is bitter cold outside. There is too much of a temperature change for them and I don't feel that is healthy. The barn itself is not heated but is attached so it does stay a little warmer. I would not suggest heating a barn as insulation is the key and to insulate a barn you cut off fresh air exchange. The indoor is watered to keep the dust down as in the summer. I honestly believe that a lot of money can be saved with proper insulation. An added bonus to good insulation is that the indoor stays cooler in the summer. During the summer on very hot days we use the indoor and it feels like it is air conditioned. One thing to watch out for in the winter is mold. With the indoor heated and the watering of the footing mold can be a problem. Hope you find a system that will work for you. :)

Edited to add: I am using radiant overhead tube heaters not floor heating.

Moderator 1
Dec. 19, 2008, 09:34 AM
This thread is a good fit for the new "Around the Farm" forum, so we moved it here from Dressage to give 'er a try.

Thanks!
Mod 1

Fluffie
Dec. 19, 2008, 02:09 PM
40 degrees Fahrenheit would be the maximum temperature maybe for your heated indoor.
50F is not the best environment for your horse to be working in when outside temps are so much lower - ask your vet.
Heating your indoor that warm is asking for an equine respiratory infection.
In fact I showed in an indoor heated near that and came home 9 times out of 10 with some sort of URI myself.

Our indoor uses petrolum/natural gas (whatever lives in the big white tanks outside) and runs via a thermostat when people are there to ride. It is usually set somewhere around 55 degrees and has never caused problems with drying out footing or infections of any sort, human or equine. However, our horses don't get turned out outside during the winter (constant snow/cold & rain/ice/all of the above).