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View Full Version : Stop nibbling on the FENCE!!!



Rebmik
Dec. 15, 2008, 09:27 AM
I've searched for threads to help, but didn't find what I was looking for...so here goes...
What can I put on my fence to REALLY deter nibbling, not cribbing, but nibbling???
Don't want herbal or "nicey -nicey" suggestions.
I want him to taste it ONE time and think "oh crap, that is horrible, I'm never tasting that fence again!"
I've tried tobassco, wasabi, cayenne...(don't think I'm mean) I think he actually liked wasabi.
I don't care if I have to keep re-applying, there is only a small section he does this on, because he can see nag that wind sucks and he's immature and is starting to think it might be "cool" to do that:mad: (the rest of the fence is hot wired and this small part can't be hot)
Please don't suggest more hay, or teeth checked, etc.:no:
Just something ugly, gross for him to get a taste of!!!!;)

Hampton Bay
Dec. 15, 2008, 09:40 AM
Have you tried the bitter apple stuff that they sell for dogs?

I know of people who swear by used motor oil, and I have seen it work, but not sure how safe it would be if they decided to chew anyway.

Rebmik
Dec. 15, 2008, 09:55 AM
Have not tried bitter apple, am going to pet store today anyway and will pick some up.
Will also try motor oil, like I said, I'm not trying to "be nice" (don't wanna kill him) although when I see him doing it sometimes I think I could;)
It's only like 3 rails, I'll try the motor oil on the most "popular" and if he still nibbles, it won't be too much
Thanks,
keep em coming!!!

manyspots
Dec. 15, 2008, 10:11 AM
I use McNasty by Eqyss... seems to do the trick with my nibblers. Second ingredient is Olerescin Capsacium (sp?). This will burn your nose if you don't vet the place when you apply, but is odorless and colorless and safe for a variety of surfaces.

SS189
Dec. 15, 2008, 10:15 AM
Dycosote!!!

cloudyandcallie
Dec. 15, 2008, 10:16 AM
Put Quitt in the horses and either Hoof Heal (from a gallon jug) or WD 40 on the fences.
I've also used generic ivermectin in small places like the stall.

sometimes there is a mold in the wood that attracts horses.

The Quitt worked on mine.

cyndi
Dec. 15, 2008, 10:59 AM
this is not for the faint of heart... When my beavers started chewing on the support poles on their run in shed, I mixed up a concoction of (wear your latex gloves!) horse poop and Dawn dishwashing liquid and smeared it all over the posts. It did the trick!

Simkie
Dec. 15, 2008, 11:00 AM
Hot wire. Make the fence live, and he won't chew on it. Oh, just realized that's not an option.

Dawn dishwashing soap seems to deter chewers.

How about nailing some angle iron to the top of the boards?

carp
Dec. 15, 2008, 11:06 AM
Aside from various horse potions, you can also get deer repellants with Bitrex in them. Bitrex is a harmless but extremely bitter substance. The deer repellants tend to have long acting binding substances and a light smell to warn the animal not to take a nibble. Be sure to wear gloves and a scarf over your face when you are applying Bitrex. The stuff won't do you any harm if it drips onto your fingers or if the breeze blows a little of the spray onto your lips, but you'll get an unbelievably nasty taste if you lick your lips or touch any food with your fingers afterwards.

Have you thought about getting your horse something he's allowed to chew on? We have a lot of poplar and pine branches down in the pasture right now, and the horses are absolutely delighted. They eat their breakfast and lunch hay when they're hungry and mean business. Then they spend the warm afternoons poking around in the brush piles stripping bark off the branches for amusement.

BornToRide
Dec. 15, 2008, 11:13 AM
Does this not usually mean they are not fed frequently enough or need more fiber in their diet? How about using small meshed hay bags to keep them eating longer, as it simulates more natural foraging?

Aside from that, I was told a vet once said to use dog poop and put it on the boards. Disgusting, but I think it works in all cases.

mjrtango93
Dec. 15, 2008, 11:18 AM
What worked to stop 2 actual cribbers for us was to mix crisco (the lardy smear kind) with cayan or tobasco and smear it on the fence. The lard in the crisco really accentuates the flavor of whatever you are putting in it! It is messy, but they tend to get the hint.

Tree
Dec. 15, 2008, 05:10 PM
Burnt motor oil worked when mine were chewing on their shelters. Don't tell the EPA though!

Tree

Daydream Believer
Dec. 15, 2008, 06:37 PM
Does this not usually mean they are not fed frequently enough or need more fiber in their diet? How about using small meshed hay bags to keep them eating longer, as it simulates more natural foraging?



I don't think it's the case all the time. I have had my horses leave their hay to chew on the siding of this one shelter I have. I'm at my wits end too and am delighted to see this thread! I have lots of new ideas! :cool:

Obi
Dec. 15, 2008, 06:56 PM
After owning two cribbers, the only thing that worked was CRIBOX.

It is available at Dover and I think Smartpak now carries it too. That stuff sticks to anything (metal fences, wood, pvc) and do not get it under your nails as you will never bite them again! Only thing...its expensive and is really for those areas that you just cannot hotwire.

Good luck!

chaltagor
Dec. 15, 2008, 07:30 PM
Does this not usually mean they are not fed frequently enough or need more fiber in their diet? How about using small meshed hay bags to keep them eating longer, as it simulates more natural foraging?

I don't think the horses at my barn could get any more hay than the nice round bales they have in the pastures, and they do it too. I got so frustrated at one horse eating every rail in just one section that borders my pasture that I wrapped wire around it. Working very well so far.

MunchkinsMom
Dec. 15, 2008, 09:48 PM
Go to your local dollar store, get several bars of strong smelling deodorant soap (like Irish Spring). Rub liberally on the already chewed spots and anywhere else that you think they might chew.

I guarantee they won't chew it after you apply the soap. I have been doing this for years (as needed) both in the barn and on the fences.

kellyb
Dec. 15, 2008, 09:52 PM
Sorry no advice, but I had chewers and they drove me up a damn wall also!!

They were such jerks about it too. I'd spy them chewing, run out there like a lunatic to shoo them away...then the very second I turned my back I hear CHOMP CHOMP CHOMP. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!

BornToRide
Dec. 16, 2008, 12:46 AM
I don't think it's the case all the time. I have had my horses leave their hay to chew on the siding of this one shelter I have. I'm at my wits end too and am delighted to see this thread! I have lots of new ideas! :cool:
Perhaps there's something else then missing in the diet that they find in the wood? Or it became a learned bad habit maybe.....

magayle
Dec. 16, 2008, 05:53 AM
rubbing any bar of soap over the wood worked for me...i save all my end of the bar pieces just for winter nibblers and keep one in my pocket every time i go out...after trying all of the stuff in this post it's the only thing that worked and with the least amount of effort and expense

pura vide
Dec. 16, 2008, 06:30 AM
I've searched for threads to help, but didn't find what I was looking for...so here goes...
What can I put on my fence to REALLY deter nibbling, not cribbing, but nibbling???
Don't want herbal or "nicey -nicey" suggestions.
I want him to taste it ONE time and think "oh crap, that is horrible, I'm never tasting that fence again!"
I've tried tobassco, wasabi, cayenne...(don't think I'm mean) I think he actually liked wasabi.
I don't care if I have to keep re-applying, there is only a small section he does this on, because he can see nag that wind sucks and he's immature and is starting to think it might be "cool" to do that:mad: (the rest of the fence is hot wired and this small part can't be hot)
Please don't suggest more hay, or teeth checked, etc.:no:
Just something ugly, gross for him to get a taste of!!!!;)
We have a number of 'chewers' and I have tried many of these alternatives and indeed diesel fuel which I thought would certainly deter them - not so!
We are just finishing off a comprehensive electric fence and I am wondering why you cannot electrify your particular area; I have not come across a part that we cannot do in our 4 miles of fairly intricate fencing.

SmartAlex
Dec. 16, 2008, 09:15 AM
I'm not sure it's cost effective, but Icthamol salve stops it completely.

Rebmik
Dec. 16, 2008, 09:28 AM
what is icthamol? and what is dycosote?
yesterday afternoon I sprayed bitter apple, then last night it POUR down rain, probably all washed off now.
Can't hot wire this area, because it is not my farm and I've hot wired what I could.
Nothing to do with diet what so ever! I watch him watch the nasty nag windsucker, then look down at his rail and begin nibbling, he only does it where he can see her do it...there are probably 6 other rails that he can't see her and they don't have a nibble on them!!!!
I am putting stuff on her rails too, but I think after 20+ years of wind sucking she doesn't care if anything is on there, don't even know if she has tastebuds anymore:winkgrin: The sound alone drives me batty, and in this dreary, rainy, muck that is not hard to do!

Tree
Dec. 16, 2008, 09:36 AM
Cribbing and wood chewing are different. Not sure how much affect chew stop remedies would work for a cribber because they aren't chewing the wood. It's the repeated behavior that wears down the wood if they use the same spot everytime.

A wood chewer is eating the wood, not resting its teeth on a spot. I would think they get a larger portion of the chew stop stuff in that case.

Tree

SmartAlex
Dec. 16, 2008, 03:25 PM
what is icthamol?

It's a black drawing salve. We have it around for hoof abcesses.

Seven-up
Dec. 16, 2008, 08:24 PM
My suggestions would have been hotwire or some sort of metal covering, and more hay. Although some just like the taste of wood, even if they're getting enough forage.

I used to have a horse who loved the taste of those chew stop sprays, and all manner of cayenne/hot spicy concoctions. I think she thought I was doing it on purpose to make the wood even tastier than the 'original' flavor. :lol:

Foxtrot's
Dec. 17, 2008, 11:00 PM
A lot of these suggestions leave gukky stuff on the rails, so it depends if your horse will rub on it, or someone will put their hands on it and then rub their eyes, etc.

Tree - you spoke before me. While not environmental, when used diesel oil is painted on dry wood and has a chance to soak in it does deter our horses. And it does not, after initial application, leave a guckky residue like Crisco etc. would. Not that I'd advise you to lean on it with your best white shirt.

In Kentucky they use a special dark paint with anti-chew properties - does anyone know what that is?

We cannot get creosote any more - mus be bad stuff.

eventchic33
Dec. 18, 2008, 07:33 AM
Raplast is pretty nasty stuff, just don't stand downwind when you put it on. It will burn your face, eyes, and nose all day long.Ask me how I know!!!!

LLDM
Dec. 18, 2008, 08:34 AM
I can't afford Quitt for so many horses so I use Sulfur Salt. It's the yellow blocks next to the white (plain) and red (mineral) salt blocks at your feed store. All it is is salt and sulfur. I use the small (4#) blocks in their stalls along with their regular salt blocks. One of these days I'll get around to putting big (50#) blocks in all the run-ins too.

Sulfur is the only unique ingredient in Quitt. Sulfur salt really inexpensive (cheaper than my regular salt) and lasts a very long time. I won't complete stop them from chewing right away (it becomes a habit) but they start backing off quickly and usually pretty much stop all together after a while.

Sorry for the "nicey, nice" suggestion, but in my experience it has worked wonders. Thank my local cow guys for this and the fact it is always in stock at the feed store. :D

SCFarm

DairyQueen2049
Dec. 18, 2008, 09:55 AM
Got thrush dope? :cool:

Oh yeah, it does too work. :winkgrin:

If you have thrush-x your wood will be green - and it will stay green a loooooong time. But not a horse mouth will touch it.

Foxtrot's
Dec. 18, 2008, 02:57 PM
LLDM - how do you apply the sulphur salt? I've actually never seen it here.

trubandloki
Dec. 18, 2008, 03:13 PM
In the good 'ol days we painted creosote onto the boards. It worked great to preserve them and discourage chewers. Too bad anything that works well is now illegal to buy.

tazz001
Dec. 18, 2008, 03:25 PM
I have a pair of mini donks that chew live trees out of boredom in the winter....yes its boredom as they have a round bale available....My neighbor used a product called "Deer-Off" on their fruit trees...I confiscated a bottle...sprayed the girls fav trees and they don't chew/nibble/knaw on thsoe trees anymore...

Just another product to try...I think they get it at their local garden supply place.

LLDM
Dec. 18, 2008, 06:20 PM
LLDM - how do you apply the sulphur salt? I've actually never seen it here.

You don't apply it to the fence, you set it out along with your regular salt blocks. The horses lick it (or chew it) and start leaving your fences alone. Hopefully. :) Like I said, it is the main (unique) ingredient in Quitt. So if thst works for you this will too - only much, much cheaper.

SCFarm

mtngirl
Dec. 19, 2008, 01:54 AM
Another Cother suggested this for cribbers. This stuff will wash off...but it's the only thing I've found which actually works for my horse for cribbing and wood nibbling, and I think I've tried them all, Raplast, cayenne, Bitter Apple etc.
http://www.liquidfence.com/equine/cribbing.html :yes:

My horse will not latch onto any surface this stuff has been sprayed on. In fact, when I spray it, he will turn his back and walk away from me with a totally indignant look.

Beware though...the dogs at my barn went absolutely nuts...they acted like cats with catnip! It's purtrified egg whites....be sure when you spray it that you won't get any on you...and I really suggest wearing a mask because it really stinks when wet. :eek: :yes: But when it dries, you can't smell it. Dries pretty quickly (thank goodness!)

Foxtrot's
Dec. 19, 2008, 02:05 AM
I wondered what you meant - it read slightly ambiguous to me.

S1969
Jan. 8, 2009, 07:31 PM
Interesting thread! I board a gelding with a horrible oral fixation. He was a bottle-fed orphan but I believe he was also allowed to get away with terrible manners. He bites and chews just about anything inlcuding the stall doors, door jambs, fence rails, my mare's tail :no: and even his own leg if you scold him and he doesn't have anything nearby to bite.

FWIW, he does not eat the wood; there are little piles of wood chips on the ground by my stall door right now. I think his issue yesterday & today was that my mare was in her stall (they use them as run-ins) and he wanted to be in there. So he stood outside, alternately chewing on the door and trying to bite her until she finally gave up and left.

I tried to use cayenne powder in water today but my sprayer froze after only a few squirts. I will definitely try the soap next; sounds easy to use and not as messy as motor oil.

What "toys" do you allow your horses to have/what do they like? His owner doesn't want to give him "lick-its" because he's pretty fat as it is (and I agree). We have pine trees that sometimes drop limbs into the paddock and he doesn't seem interested in those.

cloudyandcallie
Jan. 8, 2009, 07:51 PM
Actually pine bark is good for them, and it is even sold for use.:eek: Like Georgia isnot full of free pine limbs.

Get the Quitt or sulfur salt for the chewers. It really works. :yes:

I don't think anything will work for cribbers, unfortunately, except to make their stalls grip proof so they cannot get their teeth on something to grip and suck.

luxesport
Jan. 9, 2009, 10:06 PM
I was told to use liquid soap, which seems to work quite well, but it washed off quite quickly, especially in our wet climate . Then I bought some dishwasher detergent gel- you can get the large jugs of no name brand at places like Walmart quite cheaply- and it works VERY well. It goes on with a paint brush like a paste, and dries in a film over the area. The horses have never touched it. It even lasts after a rain or 2 (though you might get some soapy bubbles!) The only down side is that it dries very white- so if you have to put it on anything that isn't already white it is very noticeable.

Brockstables
Jan. 9, 2009, 10:24 PM
OMG, if I hear our boarder's horse cribbing noise one more time, I am going to pull his *&$# teeth and he can gum the stall walls!
I have tried Vicks, with some decent results, but needs to be reapplied and is messy! Vaseline, applied in a thick layer on his favorite spots, made him move his favorite spot somewhere else. Today I spoke with a farrier about the problem, and he suggested Joy dishwashing soap - HAS to be Joy. No, I don't know why, but it does. (Funny, my hubby complains that Joy does not rinse out of the cups when my daughter does dishes...)
I bought JOY dish detergent today, and poured it on the stall door and wall where he cribs. About 20 minutes later I got a call from the boarder thanking me for not alerting him that everything was coated in soap. Hee hee. Well, the horse isn't touching it at the moment, and the boarder won't either! Works well, if ya ask me!

Foxtrot's
Jan. 9, 2009, 10:51 PM
Is sulfur salt designed for chewers, or does it have another use ? Never heard of it before.

Foxtrot's
Jan. 9, 2009, 11:26 PM
Never mind - just googled it.

Fairview Horse Center
Jan. 10, 2009, 01:35 AM
2 things stop beavers, using electric wire, and OAK boards. I can't believe how many farms are fenced using "yummy" type wood. Other kinds of wood are for home fencing, not horses.

PortPonies
Jan. 15, 2010, 02:23 PM
In the good 'ol days we painted creosote onto the boards. It worked great to preserve them and discourage chewers. Too bad anything that works well is now illegal to buy.

Hmm. I was wondering what happened to creosote -- seems like it was everywhere when I was a kid, and now that I have a chewing horse, it's nowhere to be found.

After having my horse in a couple different barns, playing with his diet to get it all right, and seeing him start chewing voraciously in the new barn, I've concluded that it's the same issue my cats have with the soft, unfinished pine at home. It just FEELS GREAT to sink those teeth or claws into it. I guess it's like me and my preference for crunchy granola bars!

Why the current barn owner used soft, fresh wood without capping the edges when he build the stalls, I do not understand. But my horse is systematically eating his way through it and spreading the tasty word to all his stallmates.

I've been wondering what the heck to do (cayenne, no-chew, etc. have been effective mildly if at all), and am going out right now to get me some strong Irish Spring! Thanks to all on this thread for a cheap suggestion....hope it works.

tabula rashah
Jan. 15, 2010, 02:58 PM
Motor oil works best IMHO. A good healthy dosing of hair spray helps (and is easy to apply) too..

Fairview Horse Center
Jan. 15, 2010, 04:44 PM
I've concluded that it's the same issue my cats have with the soft, unfinished pine at home. It just FEELS GREAT to sink those teeth or claws into it. I guess it's like me and my preference for crunchy granola bars!.

Horses think pine is yummy!

Oak, OAK, OAK! :winkgrin:

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Jan. 15, 2010, 05:40 PM
If you're in an area without a ton of rain, we've had success with a potent mixture of cayenne pepper and dishwashing liquid (dawn, palmolive, etc). Cheap, and easy to paint on the top rail.

Griffyn
Jan. 16, 2010, 03:09 PM
My BO nailed a strip of aluminum siding or something along the top edge of the board and they dont like it, no fun.

ToiRider
Jan. 16, 2010, 03:28 PM
The last year I boarded my horse, he and his pasture mate started chewing the wood fence. The BO put cribbing collars on them. It slowed them down but did not stop them. I mentioned that I did not think that it was a cribbing issue, but rather a chewing issue, but it was her fence being destroyed, so I let her handle it her way. I also offered compensation for the fence. When I bought my own place, the chewing stopped almost immediately. What was different? My pasture was much better than where he had been boarded because there was more of it, it had not been grazed in 4 months, and it had been seeded with a very good pasture mix. He was in heaven in his new pasture. Plus, he was on 24/7 pasture board before (with a run in shed and a round bale). He now gets stalled about 8 hours a day, during which time he has grain and hay in his stall. He also gets hay in the run-in and/or outside when he is out to pasture during the winter. In other words, he has a more complex schedule with plenty of good forage every day, which has alleviated his boredom. He has not chewed in 6 months, and he had become a confirmed chewer. I am so happy about this!

Also, I would recommend that you buy a solar fencer for about $100, and hot wire the section of the fence that is getting chewed. Solar fencers are great. I use one when I go camping with my horse. It won't cost you any more that rebuilding that fence repeatedly and all of the gunk you are going to have to buy to apply to the fence.

LauraKY
Jan. 16, 2010, 03:55 PM
Dycosote. http://www.dycosote.com/ (http://www.dycosote.com/)

tucktaway
Jan. 16, 2010, 05:42 PM
I don't agree with the oak theory!! That's the only kind of fencing I have, and it gets chewed. It's just more expensive to replace!!!!!

Rio Wild
Jan. 19, 2010, 03:04 PM
Do you think these solutions would work equally well for a a horse that is eating my jumps? The arena is the only place I can turn horses out and one will not stop eating the jumps.

sublimequine
Jan. 20, 2010, 12:29 PM
Cover the wood with something. Metal, or buy some of that black plasticy tubing that you see attached to gutters and such.

This stuff:

http://allsurfacecleaning.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Gutter-Extension-300x225.jpg

Slice it open lengthwise, wrap the boards with it, nail it to the boards. Horses really don't like it. It's ridged so not comfortable to bite on, and a yucky plastic flavor. :lol:

sunnsideup
Jan. 20, 2010, 04:06 PM
we use tar paint, it works wonders. only problem is if you get it on your clothes it wil NEVER come out.

PRS
Jan. 20, 2010, 05:01 PM
I purchased a pony at auction once and when I got him home it turned out that he was a cribber :cry: Wish I'd known that before I bid on him. Anyhow...I got my rubber gloves and smeared fresh horse manure on all surfaces he was cribbing on. Stopped him cold. In fact he NEVER touched the areas with the horse manure again. One application was all it took for this guy. :lol:

TrueColours
Jan. 20, 2010, 06:03 PM
Well - I have been busy coating my chewed areas in Fiebings hoof dressing (soaked in and wasnt so effective after that, icthamol ointment (they licked that stuff off ...) but the winner so far is Hooflex hoof dressing. Best part is that it actually blends in with the wood and looks "natural"

They wont go near it so far

Next choice if none of these work is some vaseline with cayenne pepper

Thoroughly pisses me off that with perfectly good hay in their hay tubs AND the cedar, pine and spruce limbs I cut for them EVERY MORNING and throw into their paddocks so they can chew on them, they still insist on standing there and eating the boards and posts

War has been declared! :mad:

BaroquePony
Jan. 21, 2010, 01:33 AM
Hmm. I was wondering what happened to creosote -- seems like it was everywhere when I was a kid, and now that I have a chewing horse, it's nowhere to be found

Carboleum. It is supposedly a derivative of creosote, just has more of the toxins removed. Creosote was very carcinogenic I believe. That's why only certain wood treater dealers can get it now. But, fence builders I talked to recently said that Carboleum works and it is also a wood preservative. Might be a bit expensive for an entire fence, but for patch work it may be perfect.