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slc2
Nov. 15, 2008, 03:52 PM
Anyone in Northeast Ohio know where we can get a tranquilizer gun????

We have a serious problem, and I hope no one thinks this is FUNNY.

My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.

Please PM me, or post here if you have any suggestions or have a gun we can borrow.

tuppysmom
Nov. 15, 2008, 03:58 PM
Dept of Fish and Game!

Local Humane shelter

State Police

cloudyandcallie
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:05 PM
Animal control, they have to have them for dogs.

DNR (dept of natural resources) for wild animals, they have them.

If not, the cops might kill the cow to protect motorists.

Doesn't someone have a rope?

Lure the cow with feed in a bucket?

Anyone got a herding dog like an Aussie or Heeler? They are great at this.

Good luck.

kookicat
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:05 PM
Oh, wow. Poor girl. :( Can you close the road off at all? Would she follow a calm horse back to safety?

I hope it works out okay.

cloudyandcallie
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:09 PM
And if a vet is there, or you can get to one, get some tranqulizers and put them dissolved in water in feed, and put the feed pan where the cow will find it.

Don't y'all have Ace or Rompum (xylazine) at the barn? Use it in feed. put in pan. put out where you can herd the cow towards it. Hopefully she is not too frightened to eat.

Buffyblue
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:12 PM
Jeez! I hope you get her! Any team penning people out there who could help? Any way to totally block her into a small space? They're going to have to close the road to avoid accidents! Keeping fingers crossed for you all.

Bluey
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:13 PM
Ask at the local sale barn for some cowboy with a horse and rope.
There are roping clubs in every part of the country now, look for one in the yellow pages?
If not, large animal vets would know who is a roper that could help.

If not, how about herding dog trainers?
They have the dogs for the job and you can get a cow dog broke in a hurry with the right dog/s.

slc2
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:22 PM
We have rompun, she won't come up to a feed pan. We put out feed right when it happened, there's still so much green grass, apples and other stuff out that she won't come near any feed that's set out. It's like she just lost her mind. She's normally gentle. I don't know if someone on a horse could get anywhere near her. It's just open fields and she is as wild as a march hare all of a sudden. I think I best chance is to shoot her with a tranquilizer dart. Even at that someone would have to be a hell of a good shot, it's a very long shot Most deer are shot at relatively close distances, long shots are - well - long shots.

At one point she was over five miles away from her paddock.

We came in to warm up, it started to rain so hard we couldn't even see, so we loaded hay for a while.

I'll go back in a while, but right now we are a little rattled.

I went to take the truck back to the house and the brakes went out! What a day!

Posting Trot
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:27 PM
I'm sorry, this kind of thing is terrifying.

One possibility would be that if there is another cow from the herd who is halter-trained and easy to deal with, to lead that cow over to the side of the road and let the cow that's loose see it. have some feed laced with tranquilizer ready.

Hope this helps.

SLW
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:36 PM
Ditto posting trot. Short of a tranq gun you need cowboys and portable panels. GOod luck.

twofatponies
Nov. 15, 2008, 04:47 PM
Sounds like a terrible day! The windy weather surely isn't helping. Best of luck!

deltawave
Nov. 15, 2008, 05:01 PM
Local zoo, maybe? Could the cow have injured herself and be not right in the head? :(

shakeytails
Nov. 15, 2008, 05:55 PM
Try getting in touch from the local cattleman's assn. (beef cattle). Perhaps one of their members knows where to find a tranq. gun. They may also have someone with a portable corral and sweep system already on a trailer to try to get her into.

IveGotRhythm
Nov. 15, 2008, 05:55 PM
Hey, I'm from rural northeast Ohio and there should be NO shortage of cowboys to help you with this. I can't imagine that there aren't some ropers in your area.

Sure should be easier to find a roper than a tranquilizer gun (which I imagine only zoos have).

Okay, having the cow slung to the ground with ropes might not be as peaceful as a tranq, but it's a hell of a lot better than getting hit by a truck.

I guarentee you, at least in my County (Knox) they DON'T have animal tranquilizer guns. Especially not for large animals.

For large animals, they have GUNS. Period. So be careful what you wish for when calling Animal control.

Guin
Nov. 15, 2008, 05:57 PM
Good luck with the roaming cow. I hope she ends up safe and sound.

shakeytails
Nov. 15, 2008, 05:57 PM
Oh, if you're thinking of roping her- ask the local farriers. I'd think they're more likely to know who has working cow horses than the vets.

Daydream Believer
Nov. 15, 2008, 06:27 PM
I was thinking someone used to working cattle from horseback also. What about driving her into a trap using panels and a group of people on foot? I've heard of loading cattle that way too using a panels and a trailer.

Down here, we have a local vet with a tranq gun actually. You might call some other practices and see if anyone has one.

Can any of the Amish help? That area has a lot of Amish as I recall. They might be a bit more cow savvy than your average person and perhaps they know of someone?

I hate to say it too but shooting her to stop her from hurting someone might be necessary. I hope not. What a tough situation. I have heard that cattle are awful to catch when loose. They just go and go...

horsegirl888
Nov. 15, 2008, 06:37 PM
I would also try to find cowboy(s)/horse(s) to try and rope her or contain her... If anyone has a stock-trained Aussie, Heeler, Border Collie, etc dog, that might help too... they can get them to go pretty well if they listen to the handler. So sorry, this sounds like a terrible situation and I hope no one, including the cow, gets hurt! Good luck.

Bluey
Nov. 15, 2008, 06:51 PM
Our vet is licensed as a wildlife rehabilitator and has a tranquilizer gun.
You may ask around what vet in your area is in charge of wildlife and he may have one also.

I still think that your local cattle sale would know who to contact if they themselves don't have someone handy with a rope, as they have such problems as escaped livestock regularly.

All of us here regularly put loose wild cattle back in the pastures...bumping them with our pickups.;)

Sobriska
Nov. 15, 2008, 06:55 PM
Jingling that you can catch her before she or someone get hurt.

slc2
Nov. 15, 2008, 06:58 PM
they tried with the truck before I got there. It was stuck out in the middle of the field.

Bluey
Nov. 15, 2008, 07:02 PM
they tried with the truck before I got there. It was stuck out in the middle of the field.

:lol: :winkgrin:

We also use fourwheelers and hopefully don't get those stuck.:D

the_other_mother
Nov. 15, 2008, 07:31 PM
If you have a zoo or wildlife refuge nearby they have to have a tranq gun. The Animal Control officer surely must know who has one. We had a deer that jumped thru the bank window and was running around the bank, I work for a vet and we had to call Animal Control who had to contact Six Flags to borrow their gun so our vet could shoot it and bring it to our clinic so we could fix the wounds and rehab him. ANYWAY......call the animal control officer in your district and have them find one. Dont forget that once the cow is down you need a way to get it home (truck with hydraulic lift?) or lotsa of muscles to help drag it into a trailer or something.

Daydream Believer
Nov. 15, 2008, 08:55 PM
they tried with the truck before I got there. It was stuck out in the middle of the field.

I was thinking that very thing when Bluey posted that...here in SE VA right now after God Knows how much rain, you'd never get a pickup in or out of a field! My knowledge of Ohio is that you have similar flatish ground that does not drain well.

How about 4 wheelers?

MiMuneca
Nov. 15, 2008, 09:43 PM
Well, what was the outcome? Is Bessie safely back in her pasture? Or do all us OH peeps have to keep an eye out for hitchhiking cows S/B on I-71?:lol:
I do hope the situation had a positive resolution for all.

MM

2Jakes
Nov. 15, 2008, 10:01 PM
I sure hope she has been caught by now but...how about a *friend* cow/goat/pony (?) and/or gently encircle/corral her in a length of soft fencing (like snow fence with poles every so often---if there is a large animal rescue group nearby they may be of help) that slowly encircles her, perhaps whilst she is eating some incredibly yummy hay(?).

Jingles for a safe recovery!!

grandprixjump
Nov. 15, 2008, 10:36 PM
do all us OH peeps have to keep an eye out for hitchhiking cows S/B on I-71?:lol:
I do hope the situation had a positive resolution for all.

MM

She wasn't chosen to be a Happy California Cow, that's why she's so upset...:lol::lol::lol:

slc2
Nov. 15, 2008, 11:12 PM
No, we gave up. Hopefully we have a couple days. The weather promises to be even worse tomorrow.

There is one possibility that she could wander on to his uncle's land and get in with his beef herd. She is just not herdable or drivable.

Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. The owner is a farmer and they have tried everything they know.

I have one idea, is tethering another age-match heifer in the area and hoping she couples up with the other heifer and then can be caught. The other heifers he has are not very tame, though, I don't know if we could walk any of the others on the road. The poor animal. I know a horse by itself like that is just frantic.

sidepasser
Nov. 16, 2008, 07:22 AM
A couple of GOOD cowboys and cattle horses can work in large open spaces, one heading the other heeling. Used to done all the time on ranches in wide open spaces..especially when a rogue cow decides it is NOT time for the fall branding and/or the spring worming/shots.

Like other horse events, maybe the cowboys have only gotten good in the arena rather than the wide open spaces they used to work in.

Maybe Bossy will get tired and take up with the uncles herd, another reason we gave up having cows..one gets out and it can go 20 miles before deciding that it is time to give up.

I've chased many a cow and would rather chase a horse any day..at least they do show some sense about being caught once the "game" is over.

Good luck with the cow, sounds like she got into the loco weed and lost her mind.

county
Nov. 16, 2008, 07:28 AM
Roping and Cutting horses are meant for confined areas? I hardly think so, we have a herd of beef cattle that we pasture two miles from home and use the horses to drive them there in the spring and home in the fall. If one gets out or needs doctoring during the summer they get roped the pasture is 120 acres I guess since it has a fence around it that maybe does make it confined? But not when ones on the outside of the fence.

Guin
Nov. 16, 2008, 07:31 AM
I hope the cow is safe???

Bluey
Nov. 16, 2008, 07:45 AM
No, we gave up. Hopefully we have a couple days. The weather promises to be even worse tomorrow.

There is one possibility that she could wander on to his uncle's land and get in with his beef herd. She is just not herdable or drivable.

Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. The owner is a farmer and they have tried everything they know.

I have one idea, is tethering another age-match heifer in the area and hoping she couples up with the other heifer and then can be caught. The other heifers he has are not very tame, though, I don't know if we could walk any of the others on the road. The poor animal. I know a horse by itself like that is just frantic.

We rope cattle when necessary in our pastures, that are thousands of acres, so you may consider the animals there not confined.;)
You are right that some strictly arena horses may not know how to rope outside.

It is a good idea to drive some other cattle to where she is, if you have the cowboy skills to do so without losing even more of them, preferably more than one, so she will get with them and then drive them all to a safe place.
Although some really wild ones will split and leave the herd if pushed, that is why roping is necessary some times.

Good luck.:)

arabhorse2
Nov. 16, 2008, 07:49 AM
Roping and Cutting horses are meant for confined areas? I hardly think so, we have a herd of beef cattle that we pasture two miles from home and use the horses to drive them there in the spring and home in the fall. If one gets out or needs doctoring during the summer they get roped the pasture is 120 acres I guess since it has a fence around it that maybe does make it confined? But not when ones on the outside of the fence.

My thoughts exactly, county.

Cattle get out here all the time. Cattle are Houdinis, and I find it interesting that somehow the cow is still completely freaked out, even a day later. Especially since this is supposed to be a pet, who is used to being confined, worked with, and groomed.

Cattle are usually a lot more complacent and calm down faster than a spooked horse will. At least the beef cattle I see are that way, and I can't imagine it's any different with a domestic pet.

The cattle farmers around here use 4 wheelers to corner and run cattle back into their pastures. I don't see why that wouldn't work.

Even here in VA we have people who can work and rope cattle, so I don't see why that's not an option, either.

SLW
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:09 AM
[QUOTE=slc2;3656082].

Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. The owner is a farmer and they have tried everything they know.

QUOTE]

Nope, a header and heeler can catch a cow on an open range. Still, that info doesn't fix the mess w/ this cow. I ditto the fact that a very tame cow has gone rouge is strange. She may be in heat and searching for a bull.

Good luck getting her caught today.

farmgirl88
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:16 AM
best of luck in trying to catch her! usually its not so bad when they're in a group- they tend to panick less and they can be herded easily. Maybe today, after tuckering herself out she'll be more mellow. Id try to get some horses and ropers out there too. its worth a shot.

Eventer55
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:17 AM
Once when I lived in a verrrrry rural area a cow similar to yours got loose and the owner couldn't catch it. The vet called a local guy who was a shoer/cowboy, he threw a saddle on his II Bars gelding and in no time the wayward cow was back home.

A neighbor said to me "cowboys are totally outmoded, but there jes ain't no substitute!" He was right.:yes::yes::yes::yes::yes:

ps they live for this stuff.

Guilherme
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:29 AM
Build a trap. Make it "funnel shaped" so you can move the cow into the large end and it ends up in the small. The "wings" can be made of lighter weight material (panels with cloth to simulate solid walls). The "catch pen" will have to be stout (so she can't crash through it) and tall enough so she can't jump out (cattle can jump like deer if they feel like it).

Roping might be an option, but it's really a hazard unless you've got a header and a heeler. There's an old adage about "chasing something 'till it catches you" and tying on to a scared cow "solo" is an instance where you should remember this old saw.

We've "been there and done that." We finally had success when the loose cow got into a neighbor's pasture. We talked with him and after she settled down we were able go get her into a chute, then a trailer, then home. Lots safer than traps, hazing, or roping. Find a "Judas cow" and try to get her into another herd.

Good luck with your project.

G.

P.S. You might also try calling a local zoo and see what they might have.

county
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:34 AM
If all else fails a well placed shot and shes hamburger.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Nov. 16, 2008, 10:03 AM
If Bessie's still on the loose, and you're close enough to one of the folks I know who work cattle with their border collies, I'll email one of them for you. PM me if you don't want to post your location on the public board.

Hope the poor cow (and everyone else) is still safe this morning.

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2008, 10:28 AM
Loose livestock is a real PITA.

She'll eventually end up seeking a "herd". May not be cows.

No use chasing her around unless you're on something faster than she is. 4wheelers or vehicles probably won't cut it. Rounding up cattle is a learned skill.

Nothing "wrong" with her - she's just acting like most of them do when they get loose.

Your friend is responsible for any damage the animal does - hopefully the field you damaged is hers or is owned by an understanding farmer that won't charge her for the damage!

Good luck. Been there done that and still do it. Just a part of living in the country.

Nothing quite as humiliating as being outsmarted by a cow.:rolleyes:

birdsong
Nov. 16, 2008, 10:43 AM
Have you ever seen how cows can HIDE? Its just amazing how smart they can be. I've rounded up cattle before and found a group of about 8 that had hunkered down in a thicket quietly hiding hoping we would pass them by.

CatOnLap
Nov. 16, 2008, 10:52 AM
So what happened to the cow?

She hasn't posted here since yesterday.



Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas

Oh good grief. And for real cows.

War Admiral
Nov. 16, 2008, 11:32 AM
Hope it all worked out, SLC. I agree a bunch of ropers would be the best bet. Hell, even HRH Avery can "wrangle" the roping calves here up the driveway!

farmgirl88
Nov. 16, 2008, 12:16 PM
If all else fails a well placed shot and shes hamburger.

county- go take your nonsense somewheres else. You really are extremely immature and rediclous at times.

When the dairy herd or beef herd gets loose around here ( people from members of PITA think its a great idea!)...they pretty much act like a bunch of 2 yr olds running around jumping and bucking like horses because they are so wired and excited that its a new world!

Im sure she'll settle down and stop running like an idiot after she starts to realize shes exhausted and its not worth running like wacko anymore. Does she like grain? I know my friends cows knew what it meant when you shook a pail of grain...they'd come running...just like horses.

Maybe you could lure her away from the road using a pile of grain or something yummy like that. Also i'd put signs up on the road saying slow down. We had a full sized beef cow get hit at 50mph here and it can kill someone.

The thing that sucks about trying to herd a single cow is they freak out and instead of running away like horses do, they will attempt to take you out, so theirs a lot of trouble trying to corner one in an area if you are on foot.

Best of luck....and YAY for PET COWS!!!

county
Nov. 16, 2008, 12:36 PM
Nonsense? Immature? You describe yourself perfectly.

melz
Nov. 16, 2008, 12:51 PM
county- go take your nonsense somewheres else. You really are extremely immature and rediclous at times.

When the dairy herd or beef herd gets loose around here ( people from members of PITA think its a great idea!)...they pretty much act like a bunch of 2 yr olds running around jumping and bucking like horses because they are so wired and excited that its a new world!

Im sure she'll settle down and stop running like an idiot after she starts to realize shes exhausted and its not worth running like wacko anymore. Does she like grain? I know my friends cows knew what it meant when you shook a pail of grain...they'd come running...just like horses.

Maybe you could lure her away from the road using a pile of grain or something yummy like that. Also i'd put signs up on the road saying slow down. We had a full sized beef cow get hit at 50mph here and it can kill someone.

The thing that sucks about trying to herd a single cow is they freak out and instead of running away like horses do, they will attempt to take you out, so theirs a lot of trouble trying to corner one in an area if you are on foot.

Best of luck....and YAY for PET COWS!!!

is this a private tift or can anyone comment? :D

personally, what county said was not all that out of line ( only going on this post!) I also have cows and we have a mix between pets and food. if one of the "pets" got out and refused to be caught and it came down to the safety of human life... "pet" would become dinner! ( you can always donate the meat to a homelss or womans shelter if you can't eat your pet, its understandable)

while I love ALL my animals and worry deeply about them, HUMAN life is more important to me.

county
Nov. 16, 2008, 12:54 PM
Exactly!!! We have pet cows, pigs, horses, dogs, pretty much every species of animal and bird here. But people come before animal every time. Like you said Farmgirl88 someone could get killed.

CHS
Nov. 16, 2008, 01:03 PM
No, we gave up. Hopefully we have a couple days. The weather promises to be even worse tomorrow.

There is one possibility that she could wander on to his uncle's land and get in with his beef herd. She is just not herdable or drivable.

Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. The owner is a farmer and they have tried everything they know.

I have one idea, is tethering another age-match heifer in the area and hoping she couples up with the other heifer and then can be caught. The other heifers he has are not very tame, though, I don't know if we could walk any of the others on the road. The poor animal. I know a horse by itself like that is just frantic.

Now I understand why none of you can get her. That is the most absurd thing I've ever heard. Around here SWVA they round up wayward cattle on horseback all the time. It's the easiest way to get them. I've rounded up a wayward heifer on my TB whose never herded cattle before. It really wasn't that hard. I can't believe not one person there has any sense. Cattle are stupid. They aren't hard to outwit.

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2008, 02:15 PM
Uh - it's not nonsense at all.

Ever see what happens to a car and driver when they run into a steer? You think people walk away from those collisions? Do you know what sort of liability there is to the owner of this gigantic "pet"? You should see the gouges in the road from the most recent collision - and the giant pool of blood. That blood attracted other animals and resulted in several more car accidents before rain washed the blood away. So yeah - it may be callous to suggest to shoot it but it's not ridiculous.

She will probably end up in someone else's herd, and eventually they'll get her back that way. But chasing her on foot is one way to look like an idiot. On horseback or with the help of working dogs - heck yeah. Trucks and ATV's mucking up someone's fields - I'd not be happy about that if I was the landowner.








county- go take your nonsense somewheres else. You really are extremely immature and rediclous at times.

When the dairy herd or beef herd gets loose around here ( people from members of PITA think its a great idea!)...they pretty much act like a bunch of 2 yr olds running around jumping and bucking like horses because they are so wired and excited that its a new world!

Im sure she'll settle down and stop running like an idiot after she starts to realize shes exhausted and its not worth running like wacko anymore. Does she like grain? I know my friends cows knew what it meant when you shook a pail of grain...they'd come running...just like horses.

Maybe you could lure her away from the road using a pile of grain or something yummy like that. Also i'd put signs up on the road saying slow down. We had a full sized beef cow get hit at 50mph here and it can kill someone.

The thing that sucks about trying to herd a single cow is they freak out and instead of running away like horses do, they will attempt to take you out, so theirs a lot of trouble trying to corner one in an area if you are on foot.

Best of luck....and YAY for PET COWS!!!

Kenike
Nov. 16, 2008, 02:20 PM
SLC, I truly hope all worked out well and she's home, safe, and happy again.

BUT, I totally agree that roping and cutting horses are NOT for confined areas...show horses not withstanding. I lived on a busy Farm road in Texas (FM 1102) and the cows that shared my property got out all the time. My jumper mare, who had been started by my cattle rancher FIL, and I would herd the bull back in weekly, and we'd rope cows and drag them back every now and then. It was certainly not confined, she and I aren't exactly "trained" to that kind of work, and there were the dangers of semi's flying along. Any cattle-trained horse can handle the job.
(FWIW, they weren't my cattle, and the fences my horses were behind were good. I leased 13 acres and a house on the property. The guy who owned the cows was elderly and didn't keep the fences up. I did the patching, they'd find a new spot. It got old very quick).

And, as someone already mentioned, when a cow gets out, they get scared and go wild. She'll settle as soon as she knows she's out of danger.

But, still, I hope all has turned out okay.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Nov. 16, 2008, 03:20 PM
Ever see what happens to a car and driver when they run into a steer? You think people walk away from those collisions? Do you know what sort of liability there is to the owner of this gigantic "pet"?

I wonder. I've known several lawyers who represented people who were injured because they hit a dog someone allowed to run loose, and the person's homeowner's usually picks up. After some initial chest-thumping about it being the injured person's fault for not just plowing straight ahead. Like running over the dog might not also cause a wreck. Anyway, I wonder if homeowner's would cover livestock v. car collisions?

I believe the law in our state may be that the owner isn't liable unless s/he knew or had reason to know the livestock was likely to escape. Although leaving the animal loose in the dark near a road would probably be considered negligent conduct. Yikes.

I sure hope all are safe and sound. We had a lady killed on the highway out here because the oncoming car hit a measly 100 lb deer (which then came through the lady's windshield). Can't imagine the damage a cow could cause.

greysandbays
Nov. 16, 2008, 04:06 PM
Around here, shooting loose cattle that can't be caught is not "nonsense" -- it's WHAT HAPPENS, because sooner or later, a loose bovine is going to get someone killed one way or another.

When this beast gets hit on the road, you better hope she gets hit by something big like a semi, because no driver of a car is going survive getting a cow in his lap when she comes through his windshield.

claire
Nov. 16, 2008, 04:13 PM
What ever happened?

Did you get a gun?

Or did you get a cowboy?

Or is the cow still running all over Ohio?

:winkgrin:

MistyBlue
Nov. 16, 2008, 04:13 PM
Team penning does indeed require a pen and an enclosed area.
Catching loose cattle does not require a confined area, because if the cow were in a confined area it wouldn't be loose now would it? :winkgrin:
Cattle drives are usually done without fence panels in open areas. Cattle dogs also tend to work with unpenned cattle as well as penned ones. Dogs and horses are the #1 way to catch loose cattle. People on foot, buckets of grain, ATVs and vehicles are probably the worst way to catch a hyped up loose cow. And if you do a search on youtube...police officers are another bad way to try to catch loose cows. (there's some funny videos of that)
I suppose someone good with a rope and pretty fast on their feet (or with good camouflage) might have a chance to rope it from the ground but if the cow is hyped I have no idea how that person is going to stop from water-skiiing behind said cow.
A local wrangler with a cow horse should be able to drive it or rope it just fine. 2 can head and heel it and then you can trailer it. Cattle dogs can get it into a moveable pen or nearby fenced area or at least get it still enough to get a rope or halter on it. Probably easiest to move a cow with dogs or horse though, getting a rope or halter on it doesn't guarantee you have control over it.
And a cow vs car = HUGE mess. For cow, car and passengers. And depending on state it can be a huge liability.
Tranqs don't always work on a hyped up animal unless you're planning on knocking it out cold...but then it's not easy to move an unconscious cow. :confused:

blton9th
Nov. 16, 2008, 04:40 PM
Hope all works out! We had a similar situation about 3 yrs ago! (it was not our heifer, it belonged to a local Vo Tech school.) Anyway this cow came ripping thru the golf course, police were called.

The heifer was weaned and apparently went crazy, our local officer insisted I ride in his car with him to try and locate the heifer!
I agreed I'd ride around with him, but I assured him that my 5 ft. frame and 100lbs was no match.:lol::lol: We never did catch up to the heifer, and surely no cowboys around here, and that would not have been a feasible option anyway. (Busy roads, too many houses)

Heifer was on the go for several weeks and ended up falling into a quarry.
Very tragic, as this local school had no business having ANY farm animals.:mad:

sidepasser
Nov. 16, 2008, 04:57 PM
Where's Bossy? Still running loose or did she get home?

Not even my cow and I am wondering about her...

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:17 PM
Farm owners have farm policies, not regular homeowners insurance. Farm policies cover "farmy" kinds of things - like a tractor involved in a collision. It's not a motor vehicle but is allowed to operate on roads. Livestock, fences, that's not usually covered under homeowner's policies. Your privacy fence would be, but not livestock fencing.

Hopefully anyone that has livestock on their land has consulted their insurance agent about having the correct coverage.

Hitting a cow is a horrible mess. And hopefully the poor thing dies upon impact.

I don't know if slc found the cow, a gun or a cowboy.

But I think given a choice I'd rather find a cowboy!! Eye candy!:lol::lol:


I wonder. I've known several lawyers who represented people who were injured because they hit a dog someone allowed to run loose, and the person's homeowner's usually picks up. After some initial chest-thumping about it being the injured person's fault for not just plowing straight ahead. Like running over the dog might not also cause a wreck. Anyway, I wonder if homeowner's would cover livestock v. car collisions?

spirithorse22
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:20 PM
Have you ever seen how cows can HIDE? Its just amazing how smart they can be. I've rounded up cattle before and found a group of about 8 that had hunkered down in a thicket quietly hiding hoping we would pass them by.

Erg!! We had a group of about five or six mama cows and calves at side. They were constantly trying to head to the bogs...we had to quit three times one week b/c they'd slip past a flank rider and dive into the bog. No horse could follow them. We tried once and almost lost a pack horse. Scary! We came back the third time w/ dogs. Duh. Dogs struggled but got them out and we never did try to move them without a couple great cattle dogs.

We drove a herd into a north pasture this past Septemeber, they were going to be loaded onto trucks the next day. Its three of us, pretty easy group of fifty to move, and a bull. Next day, we drive them to the chutes and load everyone...no bull. Hmm, four riders take a few hours and search the entire pasture. Come back empty handed. They give up for the day and let it be...I ride out the next afternoon and go straight through the willows w/ a very trustworthy mare...hear something, she hears something, we see the tail end of a big black bull escaping through the thickest willows...into the bog. Damn cows. :mad: Rode back, we had to get waders, whips, cattle dogs and leave the horses at the fence. So irritating sometimes!


Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. Okay, that's just hilarious! What a weird thing to say!

MistyBlue
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:31 PM
Why do cows always love swampy areas? There was a small herd of milkers right near where I used to work as a teen, my sisters worked there too. At least a couple times per year the cows would get loose and 9 out of 10 times they'd run right for the swampy areas. :lol:

J Swan, we don't always get the eye candy :no: :

http://bp1.blogger.com/_BmUDizp9oqI/R68aGCfkLNI/AAAAAAAAAYg/MkvlEfOU4YA/s400/STUPID+cowboy

Catersun
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:40 PM
I suppose some people on this thread have never heard of ranch roping.... Very different than rodeo roping. I still what to know what happened to the stupid cow.

chaltagor
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:42 PM
I'm still laughing about the fact that slc thinks no one ever had to catch a loose cow before, in the history of the world. "Why, a cowhorse? A cowboy? What could they do??? This is a field, not an arena!"

:lol::lol::lol:

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:43 PM
Why do cows always love swampy areas? There was a small herd of milkers right near where I used to work as a teen, my sisters worked there too. At least a couple times per year the cows would get loose and 9 out of 10 times they'd run right for the swampy areas. :lol:

J Swan, we don't always get the eye candy :no: :

http://bp1.blogger.com/_BmUDizp9oqI/R68aGCfkLNI/AAAAAAAAAYg/MkvlEfOU4YA/s400/STUPID+cowboy


Hey - that's not nice to post my picture on the internet, ya know!!!!!!!!

I don't know why they like swampy areas but maybe it's just instinctive. At least around here, that's where we find the most deer and other prey species. Hard for predators to get in there or see them, I guess. I know that for me, I hate going in those bottoms. It's hard to walk, I keep getting hung up in briars and fox grape, and I can't see a darn thing.

lcw579
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:44 PM
Every time this bumps back to the top, I think the saga of the cow will have come to its conclusion ...... But no! Nothing! All that panic and drama and now we are left dangling!

Perhaps the rescuers shot themselves with the tranquilizer gun? :winkgrin:

MistyBlue
Nov. 16, 2008, 05:58 PM
Self portrait J Swan...taken this morning. :lol: :eek: :lol:
(actually I probably am slowly morphing into that dude, LOL)
I try to stay out of swampy/wetland areas whenever possible...mean stuff in there. Very territorial stuff like otters, fiaher and swan and any loose swine. We don't really have feral swine here...at least not hogzillas...but loose swine loose for long enough are damned nasty too.
The not seeing far ahead thing is what's gotten me in trouble enough times in swampy areas...brushing aside vegetation only to come face to face with something that doesn't want you there. Always fun for a :eek: moment followed by a mad sprint, LOL!
The rare times cows or beefers have gotten loose around here the locals always send out cattle dogs...get them back within a pretty short time. Or they saddle up and go chase them back home. not always easy and fast but a heckuva lot easier and faster than chasing on foot or vehicle or trying to get within tranq range. I've tranq shot quite a few animals doing rehab...it's not life rifle hunting. You're pretty much within roping range in order to get that dart to sink enough to inject all the tranq anyways. Darts don't get the distance, force or accuracy of a bullet. Or even a slingshot rock. It's like trying to launch a mini-rocket with a pea shooter, they're nose heavy bulky things without being streamlined at all and carrying liquid. Like trying to drive an oil truck through an obstacle course. :winkgrin: Finding a longer distance higher velocity tranq rifle anywhere outside of a big game place is next to impossible.
But as stated, dogs and horses do work in open areas:
http://www.montanacourts.org/PhotoGallery/1/320x180/MovingCattle.jpg
http://www.blackgoldranchandfeedlot.com/images/wild_cow_catching.jpg

Traum
Nov. 16, 2008, 06:03 PM
Every time this bumps back to the top, I think the saga of the cow will have come to its conclusion ...... But no! Nothing! All that panic and drama and now we are left dangling!

Perhaps the rescuers shot themselves with the tranquilizer gun? :winkgrin:

Me thinks this was one of those proverbial legend creating stories. You know, like the one with the OTTB that jumped the 30 foot ditches and saved 200 cattle in the highway? Or something like that ;) Different poster, same big hat, no cattle story.

JSwan
Nov. 16, 2008, 06:35 PM
One of the downsides to working outside a lot, I'm afraid. Tain't enough Mary Kary night cream in the world to de-crepe my skin. Oh well. Brains before beauty, right?

I went hacking with a friend the other day and she decided to go count her herd. Turns out she's got some fence jumpers. Oh joy. So we went back there and most of them were - you guessed it - in the low lying swamp. And to top it off - they were Angus. Not even a white spot to help us count. Got that done and then my horse - who is fine with cows (except for Herefords) became surrounded by curious calves. Uh oh. Then they started playing chicken with him. Uh oh x 2. Then they started moving in for the kill.

I was laughing so hard I thought I'd pee my pants. He did manage to leave the area with most of his dignity intact. We have encountered loose livestock out foxhunting and of course - stopped hunting immediately and contained the animals until the farmer arrived.

I was made a fool of by a loose heifer once. Yes, I thought I might just be able to catch her on foot. Um..... no. It's MUCH easier on horseback - even in an English saddle, hunting attire, and a crop or hunt whip.







(actually I probably am slowly morphing into that dude, LOL)
I try to stay out of swampy/wetland areas whenever possible...mean stuff in there. Very territorial stuff like otters, fiaher and swan and any loose swine. We don't really have feral swine here...at least not hogzillas...but loose swine loose for long enough are damned nasty too.
The not seeing far ahead thing is what's gotten me in trouble enough times in swampy areas...brushing aside vegetation only to come face to face with something that doesn't want you there. Always fun for a :eek: moment followed by a mad sprint, LOL!
The rare times cows or beefers have gotten loose around here the locals always send out cattle dogs...get them back within a pretty short time.
But as stated, dogs and horses do work in open areas:
http://www.montanacourts.org/PhotoGallery/1/320x180/MovingCattle.jpg
http://www.blackgoldranchandfeedlot.com/images/wild_cow_catching.jpg

birdsong
Nov. 16, 2008, 06:38 PM
My husband hit a black angus on a stretch of dark highway in a small Porsche one night...Head injuries and months in the hospital.

Around here if cattle get out the Ag. Deputy is called and they first try to wrangle them and if that doesn't work they are shot to avoid being hit by a car.

Yes...those cows I described earlier were in a bog hiding....got them out but found one mired down that had to be pulled out or she would have died there.

Still waiting to here what happened. Hope YOU guys didn't offend the OP and now she won't tell us the end of the story!! teehee

county
Nov. 16, 2008, 06:40 PM
We have a neighbor whose cattle get out on a fairly regular basis one of their favorite places to head is a swamp in the state land next to us. They've gotten so used to being herded out of their and back home that by the end of summer they just head for home as soon as they see the horses coming.

canyonoak
Nov. 16, 2008, 08:12 PM
Here's hoping the OP updates the title of the thread so we can all stop worrying about the cow!!!!

yoo hoo, slc!!!!! UPDATE!!!

ThreeFigs
Nov. 16, 2008, 08:34 PM
Aw, I think she's fibbing about the cow! Around here, a cow gets loose, she'll find a herd to join and the neighbors figure out where she belongs by looking at her brand. We've had some that quit the bunch, but joined up with the herd in their own sweet time, through fences, across rivers, whatever.

Contrary creatures at times.

nuts4cowboybutts
Nov. 16, 2008, 09:09 PM
Heck, all you need is a couple of cowboys. Why do you think they call them "cowboys."

Cows get loose all the time and they know what to do.

Don't know where you are in Ohio, but you could call
Valley View Animal Hospital at 330 364 2552 They know cowboys.

Or call The Selway Ranch

New Philadelphia, Ohio (330) 556-4101

They know a bunch of cowboys too.

jetsmom
Nov. 16, 2008, 11:08 PM
Maybe she caught the cow and found out that it is highly trained in both Dressage and driving, and now she's laying low, so when all of this hullaballoo is over, she and Madame Bovine can make their FEI debut...

selah
Nov. 17, 2008, 12:43 AM
Yeah...a HOLSTIENER!

spaghetti legs
Nov. 17, 2008, 07:45 AM
Maybe getting some fresh air for once killed her?

Gee I hope not. I live for her stories.

monstrpony
Nov. 17, 2008, 08:29 AM
Well, I do hope the poor cow found her way to safety one way or another.

But, ummm ... ummgh ... rrrrrr

No, I won't say it. I won't. I will not. No.

rrrrmmmghphft

ARGH!

JoZ
Nov. 17, 2008, 09:58 AM
She has made 15 posts on CotH since the "We gave up" one, as recently as this morning. Apparently the urgent issue of this poor cow doesn't even merit a follow-up... poof! gone!

arabhorse2
Nov. 17, 2008, 10:01 AM
Ghost cow, apparently.

Or it was just a made up story, like the 300 cows, the semi truck, and the hero TB. :lol:

Prieta
Nov. 17, 2008, 10:07 AM
Or it was just a made up story, like the 300 cows, the semi truck, and the hero TB
Forgive me for being out of the loop, was it really a made up story??? I thought it was true.

arabhorse2
Nov. 17, 2008, 10:17 AM
Yes, Prieta, it was a made up story.

The inconsistencies kept piling up (as did the cow bodies in the story), and the OP beat a hasty retreat, never being heard from again. Of course, only after calling everyone who questioned the story, meanie doodie heads! :lol:

MHM
Nov. 17, 2008, 10:21 AM
Yes, Prieta, it was a made up story.

The inconsistencies kept piling up (as did the cow bodies in the story), and the OP beat a hasty retreat, never being heard from again. Of course, only after calling everyone who questioned the story, meanie doodie heads! :lol:

Link, please?

Hope the (fictional?) cow in the OP is OK.

arabhorse2
Nov. 17, 2008, 10:39 AM
Here ya go, MHM:

http://chronicleforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=140462&highlight=hero+TB

Prieta
Nov. 17, 2008, 11:43 AM
I remember when I read that story, I thought that it was beyond amazing and wondered why it wasn't in the news. :confused: Thought that it just didn't appeal to non-horsey folks.Thanks, Arab for answering.

Moderator 1
Nov. 17, 2008, 11:59 AM
Beyond the discussion of the capabilities of cowboys and their mounts, this thread isn't horse-related. The OP is welcome to provide us with an update via PM upon resolution of the situation, which we'll post to the thread to let everyone know the outcome.

Thanks!
Mod 1

slc2
Jun. 29, 2009, 07:19 AM
I can't remember????

cloudyandcallie
Jun. 29, 2009, 07:37 AM
No and we've all been waiting with bated breath to see if the cow survived.

Moderator 1
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:15 AM
We've moved the original bovine escapee thread to the ATF forum, which didn't exist when it was started, and merged the update thread with it.

Thanks,
Mod 1

MistyBlue
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:27 AM
That's an update? :winkgrin:

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:48 AM
It is if we finally get closure on the cow's fate :D

JSwan
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:16 AM
It is if we finally get closure on the cow's fate :D

I ate it.

CatOnLap
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:38 AM
that's true. Bey BBQ'd it and the rest of us enjoyed it with a fine chianti and a side of fava beans.

Don't you just LOVE our mods?

I know I do.

2WBs1TB
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:51 AM
Hey slick, maybe if you google it, it will refresh your memory. Cut and paste is your friend!

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:01 AM
JSwan cooked it, not me. I don't have the proper facilities and can't eat beef without dire digestive consequences (but bacon is OK--WHEW)

claire
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:01 AM
Wait a minute. Seven Months Ago SLC started this "HELP! Loose Cow!" thread and then just left everyone hanging? :confused:

So, the question I asked seven months ago still applies:


What ever happened?

Did you get a gun?

Or did you get a cowboy?

Or is the cow still running all over Ohio?

:winkgrin:

trakehner013
Jun. 29, 2009, 12:13 PM
To go with this, we know someone who bought 10 cows, who ran through the fence the day he got them. He caught 5 of them, but he still hasnt been able to catch the other 5 yet, he has tried everything and contacted every local vet for a tranquilizer gun and noone will give him any. They are now about 20 miles away from their home in another state. They have been gone for over a month now.

monstrpony
Jun. 29, 2009, 12:16 PM
Modern math: so, how many cows does the farmer still have? And if a train leaves the station five hours after the cows broke out of the field, at what time will the cows and train meet?

(anyone feeling anxious yet?)

DiablosHalo
Jun. 29, 2009, 12:47 PM
omg... the suspense is killing me.... pleeeeease update!!!

egontoast
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:18 PM
A cliffhanger from Nov/08 followed by another cliffhanger June/09?????

Should we check back in 2010 to find out the fate of the then elderly cow?

I hope said cow is running free with the wind in her nostrils and udders and that she is mateing indiscriminantly with mooses and deers.

(I sincerely hope I spelled all that correctly and that there was no perceived personal insult in there. Certainly, no insult was intended and I am hoping the best possible things for the rogue bossy).:)

LaurieB
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:23 PM
I'm ready for my update.

How Now Brown Cow? :lol:

egontoast
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:32 PM
How Now Brown Cow?

udderly brilliant!

Weighaton
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:33 PM
I hope said cow is running free with the wind in her nostrils and udders and that she is mateing indiscriminantly with mooses and deers.

.:)

For some reason this just cracks me up - wind in her udders.

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQMbXvn2RNI

http://www.cowswithguns.com/cwglyrics.html

Fat and docile, big and dumb
They look so stupid, they aren't much fun

Cows aren't fun


They eat to grow, grow to die
Die to be et at the hamburger fry

Cows well done

Nobody thunk it, nobody knew
No one imagined the great cow guru

Cows are one

He hid in the forest, read books with great zeal
He loved Che Guevera, a revolutionary veal

Cow Tse Tongue

He spoke about justice, but nobody stirred
He felt like an outcast, alone in the herd

Cow doldrums

He mooed we must fight, escape or we'll die
Cows gathered around, cause the steaks were so high

Bad cow pun

But then he was captured, stuffed into a crate
Loaded onto a truck, where he rode to his fate

Cows are bummed

He was a scrawny calf, who looked rather woozy
No one suspected he was packing an Uzi

Cows with guns

They came with a needle to stick in his thigh
He kicked for the groin, he pissed in their eye

Cow well hung

Knocked over a tractor and ran for the door
Six gallons of gas flowed out on the floor

Run cows run!

He picked up a bullhorn and jumped up on the hay
We are free roving bovines, we run free today

We will fight for bovine freedom
And hold our large heads high
We will run free with the Buffalo, or die
Cows with guns

They crashed the gate in a great stampede
Tipped over a milk truck, torched all the feed

Cows have fun

Sixty police cars were piled in a heap
Covered in cow pies, covered up deep

Much cow dung

Black smoke rising, darkening the day
Twelve burning McDonalds, have it your way

We will fight for bovine freedom
And hold our large heads high
We will run free with the Buffalo, or die
Cows with guns

The President said "enough is enough
These uppity cattle, its time to get tough"

Cow dung flung

The newspapers gloated, folks sighed with relief
Tomorrow at noon, they would all be ground beef

Cows on buns

The cows were surrounded, they waited and prayed
They mooed their last moos,
they chewed their last hay

Cows outgunned

The order was given to turn cows to whoppers

Enforced by the might of ten thousand coppers
But on the horizon surrounding the shoppers
Came the deafening roar of chickens in choppers


We will fight for bovine freedom
And hold our large heads high
We will run free with the Buffalo, or die
Cows with guns


Dana Lyons: Guitar and Vocals
With Mi Tierra Mariachi Band members:
Alberto Leyva: Vihuela
Rafael Leyva: Guitarron
Jesus Sanchez: Trumpet

Dedicated to the Mooovement.

Copyright 1996 Lyons Brothers Music (BMI)
All Rights Reserved

ThreeFigs
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:56 PM
Oh, Bey, that has me howlin'!

hitchinmygetalong
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:00 PM
Sadly, the hero in the YouTube is not quite anatomically correct.:eek:

Very funny! :lol:

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:02 PM
It adds to the hilarity :lol:

hitchinmygetalong
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:02 PM
Oh, and in answer to this:


I can't remember????

I believe you mentioned in passing in the reply to some other thread that the cow was no longer menacing the neighborhood.

LexInVA
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:06 PM
So has this Bovine uprising been quelled? Is the world safe for bacon cheeseburgers again?

goeslikestink
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:09 PM
nah-- girls you all wrong its not a cheesburger or hamburger its on your tube

cow does dressage - remember she forgot to tell you all that her now new
hoofy is a dressage cow hence why it can get a 4 beat gait lol

see she had to tranq it to get on it lol as she the world best dressage trianer book of knowledge
she expanded to using cows

harveyhorses
Jun. 29, 2009, 03:16 PM
:lol:

hitchinmygetalong
Jun. 29, 2009, 04:40 PM
nah-- girls you all worng its not a cheesburger or hamburger its on your tube

cow does dressage - remember she forgot to tell you all that her now new
hoofy is a dressage cow hence wyhy it can get a 4 beat gait lol

see she had to tranq it to get on it lol as she the wrold bst dressage trianer book of knowledge
she expanded to using cows

Actually, I think the cow in question suffered a slight stifle injury during the wild night out and had to be retired to the breeding shed. Due to her promise of incredible talent and jaw-dropping extensions, the decision was made to breed her to .... the one, the only..... THIS GUY! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9wh3kyMKJU)

There has been some concern as she was quite small (you know there is a market for the "lady's dressage cow") and as you can see, he's a big guy. Look at how he takes up the leg of the rider! His only fault (and this is probably perceived, not real) is that he has a slightly short, thick neck. But we can overlook that when we see what he can do under saddle. I have not had the privilege of seeing him in person, but I have heard that people just sit in the stands simply stunned by the complete perfection. And his halt just has the judges literally weeping. Square and unmoving. Inspirational!

So, are we looking forward to a new line of dressage wonders? Time will tell. Of course, we all know if they were being bred "over there" we wouldn't have to work quite so hard to prove ourselves as a country capable of producing world class dressage mounts.

hoopoe
Jun. 29, 2009, 05:04 PM
I hope said cow is running free with the wind in her nostrils and udders and that she is mateing indiscriminantly with mooses and deers


or Tony the Wonder Llama

the resulting calf would be a cowllamatee

hitchinmygetalong
Jun. 29, 2009, 06:21 PM
or Tony the Wonder Llama

the resulting calf would be a cowllamatee
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

JoZ
Jun. 29, 2009, 06:28 PM
I can't remember????

This reminds me of my father's trick when I begged him to tell me a story as a kid (or another and another and another story):

I'll tell you a story
Of Annie McGorey
And now my story's begun.
I'll tell you another
About her big brother
And now my story is done...

slc2
Jun. 29, 2009, 07:41 PM
The heifer has been rescued and is safe. Growing, being a heifer.

The farmer bought a dart gun for 800 dollars or so, I think from some internet outfit, and one of the farm hands shot the heifer from what I thought was an absolutely impossible distance, and got her. He shot two darts, and he believes he got her both times; I believe they found out later that they had given her a rather immense dose all together. Then they got a halter and lead rope on her and waited for her to wake up - I can't recall if they had to put her in a trailer or not, but they got her home, and she's just one of the girls now.

I didn't ask him what happened for the longest time because I just did not want to bring it up. I was thinking it probably had ended very badly. But they are happy, now they have a tranquilizer gun and figure it will come in handy again some day during another cow emergency.

danceronice
Jun. 29, 2009, 07:57 PM
It's legal in Ohio to own a tranq gun if you don't have a license? For the stuff that goes in the guns they use at the zoo you not only have to have a vet license, you have to have a DEA permit for a Schedule II drug. Must not be carfentanil.

LexInVA
Jun. 29, 2009, 08:05 PM
Tranq guns are legal just about everywhere though they are classified differently or not at all in some cases. Usually they are categorized as "firearms" and regular tranq darts/ammo can be obtained via veterinarians who sell them as needed to clients who require them for large animals.

Huntertwo
Jun. 29, 2009, 08:12 PM
What do cows cost nowadays? Wouldn't it have been cheaper to shoot her with a real gun and save the $800.00? :confused:

hitchinmygetalong
Jun. 29, 2009, 08:13 PM
slc2, I hate to say this, but your version of what happened is so anti-climatic compared to ours. I know I was expecting something much more fire-and-brimstone, something involving the state police, helicopters, and an interview with CNN. Disappointed I am.

MintHillFarm
Jun. 29, 2009, 08:37 PM
"Anyone got a herding dog like an Aussie or Heeler? They are great at this."

That would work...When Mootallica (my pet steer) got onto the road, my Rott/Lab cross helped me get him back into the paddock. It took hours and I was very concerned too about the cars, but we did manage to get him pointed in the right direction...

slc2
Jun. 29, 2009, 08:54 PM
A single cow that has gone absolutely nuts is not easy to herd with a dog.

JSwan
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:10 PM
A single cow that has gone absolutely nuts is not easy to herd with a dog.

I recall many of US telling YOU how futile it was for you to chase a loose cow. How you became knowledgeable on herding all of a sudden will remain one of life's Great Mysteries, I guess. :rolleyes:

egontoast
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:20 PM
A single cow that has gone absolutely nuts is not easy to herd with a dog.


I have to agree with slc on this point.

Married cows are much easier to herd with dogs.

Reynard Ridge
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:29 PM
What do cows cost nowadays? Wouldn't it have been cheaper to shoot her with a real gun and save the $800.00? :confused:

They spent $800US to traq a cow? :confused:

JSwan
Jun. 29, 2009, 09:32 PM
They spent $800US to traq a cow? :confused:

Cost more to tranq the cow than they get get at auction if they sell her for meat.

That must be one special heifer. But if she's married can she still be called a heifer?

Amazed they could locate her and shoot her at an impossible distance after waiting a week or two for UPS to deliver the tranq gun. I used to be an expert shot and hitting a man sized target at 300yards wasn't exactly easy. AND it wasn't even moving.

egontoast
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:08 PM
I didn't ask him what happened for the longest time because I just did not want to bring it up. I was thinking it probably had ended very badly.

It usually does for cattle. Are they keeping her until she dies of old age?

Sakura
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:09 PM
I have to agree with slc on this point.

Married cows are much easier to herd with dogs.

:lol:

bludejavu
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:19 PM
Anyone in Northeast Ohio know where we can get a tranquilizer gun????

We have a serious problem, and I hope no one thinks this is FUNNY.

My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.

Please PM me, or post here if you have any suggestions or have a gun we can borrow.

I think the bolded wording explains pretty well why they would buy the $800 tranq gun. Glad it all ended nice - I wasn't sure what was going to happen to the cow in the end.

Huntertwo
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:22 PM
I have to agree with slc on this point.

Married cows are much easier to herd with dogs.

Only if they have a prenupt.:cool:

egontoast
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:23 PM
Yes, it was very moooving.

bad cow pun!

MistyBlue
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:32 PM
They bought a tranq rifle off the internet? A high powered pro grade that's accurate at fair distances? And then waited for delivery and used it? Was someone in charge of following the cow for the shipping time so they knew where it would be when the rifle came in? And the cow didn't calm down at all in the time it took to ship the rifle? Cows don't normally stay nuts for very long IME. A few hours to maybe a day or so. Usually a rope and a horse slightly faster than a cow works a lot better, faster and cheaper. :winkgrin: People have been catching loose, wild, loco cattle like that since forever.

slc2
Jun. 29, 2009, 10:58 PM
They bought a tranq rifle off the internet?

I think so. I don't think it's a rifle. I didn't ask for a lot of details and don't know the proper terms for such things. I THINK...but am not sure, that the dart goes in an aim-able, accurate sort of gun that is designed only to shoot tranquilizer darts.

A high powered pro grade that's accurate at fair distances?

He said he shot her from quite a distance, so I would assume it was a pretty good accurate piece of equipment. Someone once told me (my SO's dad, I think) that the average killing shot in hunting is 25 yards. This was about 4 times that, I think. They paced it off because I think the fellow that did it wanted to be sure and tell everyone what a good shot he was...LOL.

And then waited for delivery and used it?

What else could he have done? The cow was out for I believe at the end over a month and a half. They tried a number of different options - none worked.

Was someone in charge of following the cow for the shipping time so they knew where it would be when the rifle came in?

No. I'm quite sure not. It was during the winter, a particularly bitter winter here with average temperatures about half of normal.
And the cow didn't calm down at all in the time it took to ship the rifle?

No.....He said that despite there being snow on the ground, there was plenty of feed on the ground and that added to the problem.

Cows don't normally stay nuts for very long IME.

Well, according to the farmer, this sort of thing isn't actually that unusual. When I first heard about it they ran down the list of various things they had tried - it was rather extensive.

There is a lot of farm land in the area, connected farms, and woods, and an animal would have a great deal of land to run on. I'm not sure I recall all the details perfectly well, but I think she was spotted on several roads, mixing in with several different farm's herds, at some distance in with his relative's beef herd on a different farm, and possibly got hit by a car once or twice during that time as well, I can't recall for sure.

A few hours to maybe a day or so.

Well maybe you haven't been on this farm, in this area, and seen this particular cow.

Usually a rope and a horse slightly faster than a cow works a lot better, faster and cheaper.

Sure...I've actually heard people laugh at the idea of catching cattle with horses on rough, wooded ground, either by cutting or roping, where there is a lot of cover. You can't get a rope on an animal when there are trees everywhere. Roping was not designed for country where cattle can that easily get up in the woods where trees are 3 feet apart.

This fellow is a very experienced dairy farmer, most of his relatives also run cattle, either dairy or beef, and he knows what he is doing. I can't recall for sure, but I do believe at one point they tried horses. You have to try and understand the lay of the land around there. It did not work. This guy is very experienced and has access to people who work cattle (there are some very good ropers around here who compete and work cattle)

Others said he should have shot the cow, and that it was a very expensive way to deal with it.

I was VERY surprised to find out that they had bought such an expensive piece of equipment to dart the animal, but I think either due to possible liability or just being a big old softie, such as the guy didn't want to see the animal get hit by a truck or otherwise die an awful death, so he was pretty determined to catch her.

People have been catching loose, wild, loco cattle like that since forever.

They haven't caught all of them. :)

I wouldn't call her loco. She wasn't eating any toxic weeds that would lead her to be loco. She just got loose some how (no, I don't recall how, just got out the fence, I think) and like many animals do when they get loose, her behavior changed. I've seen dogs get hurt or frightened and get wild and wary of people in just a day or so, where they couldn't be approached and would act like they didn't even know their owners - it isn't really that impossible.

ThreeFigs
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:01 PM
It's easier to herd four or five cows together than one rogue cow by herself. For some reason, one cowboy can pretty much handle a bunch of five by him(her)self, but one bad actor needs 3 or 4 cowboys to keep her heading in the right direction.

Pain in the butt, those types. They usually "go down the road" unless they straighten up & fly right. Or if they produce a dynamite calf every year.

Woodland
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:08 PM
It's easier to herd four or five cows together than one rogue cow by herself. For some reason, one cowboy can pretty much handle a bunch of five by him(her)self, but one bad actor needs 3 or 4 cowboys to keep her heading in the right direction.

Pain in the butt, those types. They usually "go down the road" unless they straighten up & fly right. Or if they produce a dynamite calf every year.

Amen!

MistyBlue
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:11 PM
Only way to shoot distance is with a rifle. Only way to fire a tranq round accurately and at distance is with a high powered pro grade tranq rifle. Something you'd see on Mutual Of Omaha's Wild Kingdom. And even then, most shots are delivered from a helicopter or moving vehicle in order to get accuracy. A liquid loaded anything is wobbly as heck in the air, has a short trajectory and drops like a stone after a relatively short distance.

Nojacketrequired
Jun. 29, 2009, 11:22 PM
A single cow that has gone absolutely nuts is not easy to herd with a dog.

The single cow was absolutely nuts for over 6 weeks? Did she foam at the mouth, too?

That's udderly ridiculous.
I really think you're milking this story for all it's worth.


NJR

2WBs1TB
Jun. 30, 2009, 12:28 AM
The farmer bought a dart gun for 800 dollars or so, I think from some internet outfit,
You think? You mean you don't know for sure? Why slick, you're usually such the expert know it all, to read uncertainty in one of your posts is simply remarkable!


and one of the farm hands shot the heifer from what I thought was an absolutely impossible distance, and got her. The word "impossible" is the only word that rings true here.


He shot two darts, and he believes he got her both times; Based on what? Didn't he find the darts?


I believe they found out later that they had given her a rather immense dose all together. Then they got a halter and lead rope on her and waited for her to wake up - Yes, they just sat around singing Kumbaya waiting for the cow to wake up.


I can't recall if they had to put her in a trailer or not, but they got her home, and she's just one of the girls now. You can't recall? Wow, twice in one thread!

TBMaggie
Jun. 30, 2009, 12:50 AM
Cow pies anyone???

Long Spot
Jun. 30, 2009, 02:38 AM
Sounds like quite the ordeal. I wonder if such a struggle left any ruminants behind?

Hope the owners have beefed up their fence line.

I'm not sure I believe that the owner actually bought an $800 tranq gun frankly. That's just grazy talk. But maybe. The steaks were awfully high. Hope the owners have beefed up their fence line.

Hey mods, thanks for hoofing this thread back up.

goeslikestink
Jun. 30, 2009, 04:06 AM
Anyone in Northeast Ohio know where we can get a tranquilizer gun????

We have a serious problem, and I hope no one thinks this is FUNNY.

My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.

Please PM me, or post here if you have any suggestions or have a gun we can borrow.
Reply With Quote





QUOTE=slc2;4198053]They bought a tranq rifle off the internet?

I think so. I don't think it's a rifle. I didn't ask for a lot of details and don't know the proper terms for such things. I THINK...but am not sure, that the dart goes in an aim-able, accurate sort of gun that is designed only to shoot tranquilizer darts.

A high powered pro grade that's accurate at fair distances?

He said he shot her from quite a distance, so I would assume it was a pretty good accurate piece of equipment. Someone once told me (my SO's dad, I think) that the average killing shot in hunting is 25 yards. This was about 4 times that, I think. They paced it off because I think the fellow that did it wanted to be sure and tell everyone what a good shot he was...LOL.

And then waited for delivery and used it?

What else could he have done? The cow was out for I believe at the end over a month and a half. They tried a number of different options - none worked.

Was someone in charge of following the cow for the shipping time so they knew where it would be when the rifle came in?

No. I'm quite sure not. It was during the winter, a particularly bitter winter here with average temperatures about half of normal.
And the cow didn't calm down at all in the time it took to ship the rifle?

No.....He said that despite there being snow on the ground, there was plenty of feed on the ground and that added to the problem.

Cows don't normally stay nuts for very long IME.

Well, according to the farmer, this sort of thing isn't actually that unusual. When I first heard about it they ran down the list of various things they had tried - it was rather extensive.

There is a lot of farm land in the area, connected farms, and woods, and an animal would have a great deal of land to run on. I'm not sure I recall all the details perfectly well, but I think she was spotted on several roads, mixing in with several different farm's herds, at some distance in with his relative's beef herd on a different farm, and possibly got hit by a car once or twice during that time as well, I can't recall for sure.

A few hours to maybe a day or so.

Well maybe you haven't been on this farm, in this area, and seen this particular cow.

Usually a rope and a horse slightly faster than a cow works a lot better, faster and cheaper.

Sure...I've actually heard people laugh at the idea of catching cattle with horses on rough, wooded ground, either by cutting or roping, where there is a lot of cover. You can't get a rope on an animal when there are trees everywhere. Roping was not designed for country where cattle can that easily get up in the woods where trees are 3 feet apart.

This fellow is a very experienced dairy farmer, most of his relatives also run cattle, either dairy or beef, and he knows what he is doing. I can't recall for sure, but I do believe at one point they tried horses. You have to try and understand the lay of the land around there. It did not work. This guy is very experienced and has access to people who work cattle (there are some very good ropers around here who compete and work cattle)

Others said he should have shot the cow, and that it was a very expensive way to deal with it.

I was VERY surprised to find out that they had bought such an expensive piece of equipment to dart the animal, but I think either due to possible liability or just being a big old softie, such as the guy didn't want to see the animal get hit by a truck or otherwise die an awful death, so he was pretty determined to catch her.

People have been catching loose, wild, loco cattle like that since forever.

They haven't caught all of them. :)

I wouldn't call her loco. She wasn't eating any toxic weeds that would lead her to be loco. She just got loose some how (no, I don't recall how, just got out the fence, I think) and like many animals do when they get loose, her behavior changed. I've seen dogs get hurt or frightened and get wild and wary of people in just a day or so, where they couldn't be approached and would act like they didn't even know their owners - it isn't really that impossible.[/QUOTE]


you dont half tell um........

oooh i forgot your a book writter writting romantic novels

we-- as in we in the beginning ends up with i think-----

like always your imagination gets the better of you you start with what you think is a good storey whereby you cut copy and paste

and or have seen a news item which envolved a cow in your area

as you dont know the full out come as you wasnt there we has gone to i think......
or he said then another said - as in havent got a clue

how to end your local news storey -------------- only that they got a tranq gun
mate you can get a vet out with a tranq gun within hours not days or weeks if that bad

claire
Jun. 30, 2009, 05:23 AM
gls, I am also confused by SLC's update on the loose cow situation.

-First it's her "friend's pet cow", now it's a very experienced dairy farmer's cow?

-First no one in the area (vets, sheriff, farmers, cattle ropers) have any immediate access to a tranq gun, now the farmer orders a top of the line, tranq gun over the internet, waits a month to receive it and happens to be a expert dart gun marksman?

-First the cow is out loose in a rainstorm, now it's a blizzard?

After seven months this story is as confusing as ever. :confused:


Original post:


friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything.

I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents.

have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-nowease help! To top it off ve got a full scale wind and rain storm going the weather is just really, really not helping

egontoast
Jun. 30, 2009, 05:27 AM
I think she was spotted on several roads, mixing in with several different farm's herds, at some distance in with his relative's beef herd on a different farm, and possibly got hit by a car once or twice during that time as well, I can't recall for sure.




Actually I think I remember reading about this in the Weekly World News
except as I recall there was also at least one alien abduction of said cow
during the escapade.

So hard to remember all the little details so it could well be the same cow.

goeslikestink
Jun. 30, 2009, 06:09 AM
heres the romantic novel of said cow

it used to be a pet,, handled dialy by farmer and his wifey
then one day its escapes as being on it own it was lonely and wanted other cows as freinds
so it goes of on its own to find some freinds

so it goes on the rampage as it doesnt know where to look for said freinds
so she goes along this way that way and along the highroad

isnt traffic concious so gets bumped a few times back on the grass verge said cow is now getting a bit irate at not finding any freinds , so she decides that she will run a muck with everyone until shes caught and can be put in a field of cows visiting nebouring farms etc

then one day the old farmer after loseing his house cow decides he will get a gun
dont matter want type of gun as long as it can fire a dart-------- and not a bullet


so of he goes in wild wisedom gets rings up hey matey slc2 your a writter of useless book knowledge and i know the cow isnt a horse but it does have a head 4 legs and a tial what i can do he says as he has a computer she surgest he buys a tranq gun of the internet rather than call a vet to help ---

sound like the perfect match for my trianing skills and if lucky i will write another useless book on the whole thing on how to trian and manage cows


so here is the storey ------- on the local news a cow escapes and the owners with the help of there freind slc2 have got any idea of how to catch -- said cow with a ----- gun

but they dont know how to work the gun in order to fire it at moving object
so they call another freind in whos a marksmen who get her twice for sure
but they still havent cuaght the cow as now she running around drunk

farmer says to the marksmen thats ablooming useless gun for 800$
look at me house cow - its gone nutty way look out




then the drunken cow runs into slc2 --- here's 4 pints for the price of one

drops down right besides her ------- with milk gushing from udders that are intoxicated
with tranqs which spray into and onto slc2 and she then crashing down besides the cow
fast akip ------- dreaming of how she caught the freind the farmers house cow




slc2 when your writting stories and make beleive its best to have a start a middle and an ending

the moral of the storey- is its a long tale of dribble cut copied and paste by slc2 as has no inners as in no middle of content

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 30, 2009, 07:56 AM
The single cow was absolutely nuts for over 6 weeks? Did she foam at the mouth, too?

That's udderly ridiculous.
I really think you're milking this story for all it's worth.


NJR

Sounds like Mad Cow to me. Now they're going to have to quarantine that pet, I mean, valuable dairy cow & the entire farm...maybe even the whole county!

monstrpony
Jun. 30, 2009, 09:32 AM
Sounds like Mad Cow to me. Now they're going to have to quarantine that pet, I mean, valuable dairy cow & the entire farm...maybe even the whole county!

Never mind all of that quarantine nonsense, can someone just cut her internet cable? Or shoot down the satellite? Maybe the crack shot w/ the tranq gun can help with this.

Methinks the problem is not on the dairy farm.

bad cow pun, indeed.

Nojacketrequired
Jun. 30, 2009, 09:35 AM
I think she was spotted on several roads, mixing in with several different farm's herds

Do they not have fences where you live?

Or do most cows just wander the roads?

NJR

egontoast
Jun. 30, 2009, 09:41 AM
.Do they not have fences where you live?


I was wondering the same thing.

Must be a good jumper, I'm guessing

..a Holsteiner.:cool:

Moderator 1
Jun. 30, 2009, 10:58 AM
Cow puns are fine, but let's keep things friendly...and avoid the personal commentary.

Thanks!
Mod 1

danceronice
Jun. 30, 2009, 10:59 AM
Dart guns just don't work like that. Zoos don't keep high-powered long-distance ones on hand because they don't shoot from that long a range--too much risk of hitting someone you don't want to (with darts full of chemicals that have a laundry list of emergency procedures if you even get some on your skin, let alone get darted with a large-animal dose.) For normal everyday stuff that they can't get close to with a hypo, they blowdart with slow-acting drugs.

Yeah, call me skeptical the cow was successfully on the lam long enough to order a dart rifle and get a vet to dispense and supervise the use of a fast-acting tranquilizer dart in an uncontrolled situation.

BenNevis
Jun. 30, 2009, 11:28 AM
NJR, you beat me to it... slc, don't folks in your area believe in fencing?

BN

HighFlyinBey++
Jun. 30, 2009, 11:41 AM
My apologies for being unclear with the intent of the Aricept comment. I suppose I could have phrased it better. Although Denny Crane's "mad cow" antics made me ROFL, the reality of Alzheimer's is nothing to joke about. The...er, steaks...are too high.

Now back to bad cow puns:

Cows often regurgitate their own cud. It's because they're bullimic.

Those who invest in cattle futures must pay attention to the leather forecast.

Mother cow to uncouth calf: "Were you grazed in a barn?"

Misbehaving cows must sit in the corner wearing a dung's cap.

The cow and bull mated in a heap of dung. The next morning the cow said "man 'ure great last night!"

The Secret Service surrounded the President with dozens of cows. They were trying to beef up security.

The farmer was at a loss to produce more beef. In a last-ditch effort, he put his cows in a giant centrifuge. It was so sad; he was really spinning his veals.

Eat in the field where the grass is greener? You gotta be grazy!

You shouldn't tell jokes about cows. Nobody likes a cattle-tale.

Which cows look forward to being barbecued? The ones who feel at home on the range.

Q: Do you eat veal? A: Of course not! Also, I'm trying to give up calfeine.

There are those cows who produce offspring and those who don't. It's a case of the calves and calve-nots.

(and in the spirit of things, yes, I did google and yes, these are C&P :D)

slc2
Jun. 30, 2009, 06:14 PM
Y'all havin' fun? Yes, this happened, not made up, though I don't remember everything about the cow incident, we have a lot of other things going on at the same time, but we were at least at some level intrigued and surprised at how it all came out, and I heard the story only in bits and pieces from various people that work on the farm over a few visits. Some relatives' or the hired hands' kids I think are the ones who had made a pet of her as a baby calf, but it didn't seem to make much difference when she was loose.

I wasn't really surprised that much that a heifer would get so 'wild' and hard to catch as I worked on several farms as a teenager and young adult and have heard of other such incidents, even one hand raised by a 4h kid, I've even heard of this happening with horses that get loose and even their owners can't walk up to them when they are not in their familiar environment and routine and have had a good scare. As someone else mentioned too, it happens.

Cita
Jun. 30, 2009, 06:18 PM
Y'all havin' fun?

What does it look like? :lol:

MistyBlue
Jun. 30, 2009, 07:29 PM
We have a serious problem, and I hope no one thinks this is FUNNY.

My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her.
I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.


We have rompun, she won't come up to a feed pan. We put out feed right when it happened, there's still so much green grass, apples and other stuff out that she won't come near any feed that's set out.We came in to warm up, it started to rain so hard we couldn't even see, so we loaded hay for a while.

I'll go back in a while, but right now we are a little rattled.



though I don't remember everything about the cow incident, we have a lot of other things going on at the same time, but we were at least at some level intrigued and surprised at how it all came out, and I heard the story only in bits and pieces from various people that work on the farm over a few visits. Some relatives' or the hired hands' kids I think are the ones who had made a pet of her as a baby calf, but it didn't seem to make much difference when she was loose.

Sounds more like you were very hands on instead of just hearing some bits and pieces from people who work on the farm. It's also odd that you can't remember if it was your good friend the farmer's kids who were so attached to the cow or if it was "some relative or hired hand's" kids.

slc2
Jun. 30, 2009, 07:42 PM
The guy pointed to some kids running around, I don't really know the kids paternity. I'm happy the cow survived and they found a way to catch her, and am done with this one.

Thomas_1
Jun. 30, 2009, 07:44 PM
Hey SLC don't go getting all MOOOdy on us. I'm going to take a guess that the cow is off on it's way to Moo York and worried that in this recession that it's livelihood is at steak. I'm sure though that she'll stop to rest when it's pasture bedtime and then you can run across the road to get to the udder side and just lead her to mooove her back. You don't believe me? Straight up, no bull.


There's some lessons to be learnt by these photos. In life you can't always believe that everyone who turns up when you're in trouble:.........

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa178/classic-carriages/funny/Cowwithitsheadstuck.jpg

Is there to help you......

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa178/classic-carriages/funny/Cowwithitsheadstuckpart2.jpg

Thomas_1
Jun. 30, 2009, 07:45 PM
The guy pointed to some kids running around, I don't really know the kids paternity. I'm happy the cow survived and they found a way to catch her, and am done with this one. :eek: Flipping heck, that's unlucky. He got the cow caught and now there's young goats running loose. :yes::lol:

Coincidentally I often think I'm an old goat. Funny though, I've felt like this since I was a kid.

Horsegal984
Jun. 30, 2009, 08:14 PM
oh Thomas, such the pessimist!!

Of course the bull was trying to help that poor stuck cow..... he was just trying to get a better look first!!

JSwan
Jun. 30, 2009, 08:32 PM
:eek: Flipping heck, that's unlucky. He got the cow caught and now there's young goats running loose. :yes::lol:

Coincidentally I often think I'm an old goat. Funny though, I've felt like this since I was a kid.

As long as you don't smell like one! :lol:

equinelaw
Jun. 30, 2009, 08:58 PM
Girl meets cow. Girl loses cow. Girl gets cow back. Girl meats cow:D

Huntertwo
Jun. 30, 2009, 09:08 PM
Girl meets cow. Girl loses cow. Girl gets cow back. Girl meats cow:D

You forgot - Girl eats cow. :winkgrin:

egontoast
Jun. 30, 2009, 09:10 PM
or if it smells like bullshit, maybe it IS bullshit.

RiverBendPol
Jul. 1, 2009, 06:50 AM
Oh Thomas, that CRACKED ME UPPPPPPPPP!!!:eek::winkgrin::lol: Especially because of your captions. Good grief. I've got the giggles, tea dripping down my screen..........:eek:

spaghetti legs
Jul. 2, 2009, 07:27 AM
http://dailybiz.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/mad-cow-eatmorechicken.jpg

cssutton
Jul. 2, 2009, 11:22 PM
I don't have the time to read 8 pages of this, but here is the fix.

Around every stock yard, there are cowboys that know how to catch the wildest of all cattle.

The ones I have seen usually have 4 or 5 big dogs that they have taught to herd.

They get after a cow and in a few minutes they have it hemmed in and roped.

The nearest stock yard to you will have a name.

Call them.

CSSJR

Protect your privacy. Replace Google with IXQUICK at www.ixquick.com.


If we do not wish to lose our freedom, we must learn to tolerate our
neighbor's right to freedom even though he might express that freedom
in a manner we consider to be eccentric.

Thomas_1
Jul. 3, 2009, 02:14 AM
I don't have the time to read 8 pages of this, but here is the fix. You should, it's worth it just to see how this story grows arms and legs.

Over here we're all a little more civilised ;) We have a couple of quad bikes, a few collies and a bucket with some feed in and that normally does the trick.

Anyway have you heard that

There's now two cows running round wildy.
One of them says to the other, "So what do you think about this whole mad cow disease thing?"
The other says, "What do I care. I'm in a grand prix dressage competition in Vienna this afternoon."

Nojacketrequired
Jul. 3, 2009, 11:09 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by equinelaw
Girl meets cow. Girl loses cow. Girl gets cow back. Girl meats cow

You forgot - Girl eats cow.

Hey! Don't forget!


MEAT IS MURDER!!!


TASTY, TASTY, murder!

After reading all these pages, I have collected the details of the story and will now retire to "ruminant" about it. (Or would that be "ruminate"?)

NJR

CatOnLap
Jul. 3, 2009, 11:16 AM
cssutton, you really MUST read all 9 pages before posting.

The same goes for the OP who seems to have forgotten many of the initial de-tails.
Holy Cowfabulation, what a hoofhearted ending. Tell us an-udder one! This story was such a teat!

This thread swiftly turned into a roast, and all the cow puns were just gravy.

PS- how did the OP do in Vienna?

egontoast
Jul. 3, 2009, 11:51 AM
cssutton, the idea of obtaining assistance from cowboys was suggested way back in the early pages of this thread but received this fascinating reply from the OP:



Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....

:cool:

Kaeleer
Jul. 3, 2009, 12:26 PM
Ya know, it's cows like this that put the "f" into the phrase : little heifer!

Thomas_1
Jul. 3, 2009, 12:33 PM
PS- how did the OP do in Vienna? Well I happen to know the mad cow did very well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9wh3kyMKJU

equinelaw
Jul. 3, 2009, 03:08 PM
Well I happen to know the mad cow did very well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9wh3kyMKJU

THAT looked real! How day do that?:lol:

goeslikestink
Jul. 3, 2009, 05:10 PM
Well I happen to know the mad cow did very well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9wh3kyMKJU


op -- was grooming that day--------- as a cow hand

HighFlyinBey++
Jul. 3, 2009, 08:05 PM
http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=10641954

Woman Swears at 911 Dispatcher Over Wandering Cows
Updated: July 3, 2009 06:46 PM
By Chris Hrapsky

A Dodge County woman went into a profanity-laced tirade at a 911 emergency dispatcher after asking for help from deputies to round up her wandering cows.

According to the 911 tapes, Tammy Nuttelman was home alone when seven of her cows got loose.

Nuttelman: "I need some help."
Dispatcher: "What's the problem?"
Nuttelman: "You got to round up all your cowbows there, somewhere. My cows got out and they are in the marsh."

After dispatchers told her twice that this wasn't an emergency and gave her the name and phone number of the town chairman, Nuttelman called back a third time.

Dispatcher: "911. What's the location of your emergency?"
Nuttelman: "Yes, this is a **** emergency! I've got seven ****ing cows out loose maybe going to the ****ing highway!"
Dispatcher: "OK, ma'am."
Nuttelman: "You need to let everybody know there are loose cows out there! They'll probably cause a major ****ing accident, you hear me?!"
Dispatcher: "Ma'am, you need to watch your language, OK?"
Nuttelman: "I don't care! I don't need to watch nothing!"

Dodge County Sheriff Todd Nehls says deputies didn't respond to the first calls because the cows weren't causing a hazard.

Dispatcher: "Why are you yelling at me?"
Nuttelman: "Because I tried to call before and you guys said it wasn't a ****ing emergency, and this is!"
Dispatcher: "No, ma'am, it is not an emergency that the cows are in the marsh. We gave you the number for the town chair."

This time, deputies did respond. They gave Nuttelman a citation for improper use of a telephone and abuse of 911.

Nuttelman even asked that a warrant be issued for the cows.

Dodge County communications director Pat Ninmann said dispatchers were trying to handle a serious crash elsewhere in the county at the time.

"Now we get this woman calling us up, swearing at us because we won't come and round up her cattle. You know, the dispatchers do a great job, and they expect some of that but this is completely uncalled for," Ninmann said.

Sheriff Nehls said calls like this are an example of why the job of a 911 operator is very challenging. He said he's proud of how his staff handled this particular call.

Nuttelman told us, "My cows got out and the dispatcher didn't want to help me. That's basically it."

Ironically, after Nuttelman declined any further comment and asked us to leave her property, she called the same people she berated the night before -- the sheriff's department.

Thomas_1
Jul. 4, 2009, 02:27 AM
^Blimey SLC called 911 as well as posting here?? ;)

JSwan
Jul. 4, 2009, 07:06 AM
Shame on SLC for cursing at the coppers. What would her mother think? :lol:

egontoast
Jul. 4, 2009, 07:53 PM
Thanks for updating this story, slc. :)

We can all sleep better now knowing little crazed bossy is safe after being run over by various cars, jumping in and out of various fences to mingle with various herds, hiding in trees, dodging tranq darts etc for several months on various and sundry roadways.

It totally reminds me of that book, the Incredible Journey!!:) You might want to add some companions, though. Maybe a duck and a turtle.

I hope your friend's children or some kids that were running around on some dairy farmer's property, whichever it was, are happy about the return of their pet cow!

CatOnLap
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:33 PM
You shouldn't stoop to such mockery Egon!
I had NO IDEA how crucial cows were to our political system, and I personally would like to thank slc2 for trying to rescue the "one that got away".

Here is what I learned from extremely smart people:

Cows Explain Politics (http://www.extremelysmart.com/humor/cowsexplain.php)

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 5, 2009, 12:58 PM
You shouldn't stoop to such mockery Egon!
I had NO IDEA how crucial cows were to our political system, and I personally would like to thank slc2 for trying to rescue the "one that got away".

Here is what I learned from extremely smart people:

Cows Explain Politics (http://www.extremelysmart.com/humor/cowsexplain.php)
OMG - that's the funniest thing I've read since Willem went to the Bridge!!


ETA: I didn't mean that when Willem went to the Bridge it was funny; I meant nothing's been this funny since Willem stopped writing because he went to the Bridge.

goeslikestink
Jul. 6, 2009, 08:11 PM
spooks-- ididnt think cows got the humph

Thomas_1
Jul. 7, 2009, 06:59 PM
So what happened to the lost cattle? You mean nobody herd

Do you know how SLC eventually found the cow?

She tractor down ;)

She saw it standing in the middle of the road and drove into the fence to avoid it. I wondered if it was a Jersey Cow, but she said she didn't know she never saw it's licence plates.

I heard SLC might be arrested back at the ranch for wearing a tafetta and lace dress. She was charged with rustling.

The cow asked her "why don't you shoo those flies". BTR replied "They'd be better barefoot"

So SLC decided to brand the cow. Do you know how it felt? Well it was very impressed.

Anyway I'm not sure if any of this thread is true.

I've a strong sense it's all just a bum steer

claire
Jul. 8, 2009, 10:54 AM
slc2 starts a thread:
"EMERGENCY! HELP!!! NEED TRANQUILIZER GUN!!!"
And goes on in some detail about the problems SHE is having helping her 'good friend' with 'their children's beloved pet runaway cow'.

slc2 then ceases posting on this thread.

Seven Months Later, slc2 posts an update to this thread, where-in slc2 says she simply heard the whole story second/third hand and SHE
actually had nothing to do with retrieving 'some local dairy farmer's loose cow'??? :confused:

I guess I don't see the humor in posting a thread titled HELP!!!! on a farm forum as a joke just to get attention? :rolleyes:

And then, to say you are "done with this one" when others call you on your story's inconsistencies?


This is the update of slc2's HELP!!! OP???


The guy pointed to some kids running around, I don't really know the kids paternity. I'm happy the cow survived and they found a way to catch her, and am done with this one.

BenNevis
Jul. 8, 2009, 11:31 AM
Thomas, you're killing me here... ROFLMAO!

BN

class
Jul. 8, 2009, 07:00 PM
slc2 starts a thread:
"EMERGENCY! HELP!!! NEED TRANQUILIZER GUN!!!"
And goes on in some detail about the problems SHE is having helping her 'good friend' with 'their children's beloved pet runaway cow'.

slc2 then ceases posting on this thread.

Seven Months Later, slc2 posts an update to this thread, where-in slc2 says she simply heard the whole story second/third hand and SHE
actually had nothing to do with retrieving 'some local dairy farmer's loose cow'??? :confused:

I guess I don't see the humor in posting a thread titled HELP!!!! on a farm forum as a joke just to get attention? :rolleyes:

And then, to say you are "done with this one" when others call you on your story's inconsistencies?


This is the update of slc2's HELP!!! OP???

really sheds some light on what slc REALLY means when she talks about her fei schoolmaster, her cdi pony, her european shopping trips and the dozens of trainers that are her good friends and confidantes.

or, you know, not so much good friends really, but she read about them in a magazine once.

birdsong
Jul. 8, 2009, 07:20 PM
^Blimey SLC called 911 as well as posting here?? ;)


Oh My!! Thats the post that sent me over the edge!! Hahaha Rolling with laughter.

What a kick...and what a great thread. :lol:

Oh..and Good Grief to those that just can't get with the fun of it all....take a deep breath and go clean house or something useful!!

egontoast
Jul. 9, 2009, 06:02 AM
Yes, all in good fun!

Educational, too. :)

2WBs1TB
Jul. 9, 2009, 10:12 AM
I bet a certain cow is REALLY regretting the fact that she can't keep her tall tails straight. :winkgrin:

Nojacketrequired
Jul. 9, 2009, 10:13 AM
Oh..and Good Grief to those that just can't get with the fun of it all....take a deep breath and go clean house

Cleaning house does NOT put me in a good mood.

Just sayin'.

If I want to cheer up, calf-een usually does it.

NJR

marta
Jul. 9, 2009, 10:17 AM
[B]
That would work...When Mootallica (my pet steer) got onto the road, my Rott/Lab cross helped me get him back into the paddock.

omg that is the coolest name ever.
i love it!!!! :lol:
i laughed so hard.

egontoast
Jul. 9, 2009, 04:52 PM
OH NJR, I love "calfeen" for a heifer.

For a bull, I'm saving the name 'Istanbull". Stan for short! :)

Slc, be careful, we are all on to you now! You have to admit it was a tad brazen to try and update this tall tale. Are you regretting it now?;)

2WBs1TB
Jul. 9, 2009, 10:42 PM
Eggy, I'm waiting for her to google her way out of this one....

CatOnLap
Jul. 11, 2009, 12:07 PM
well, googling for "cows on drugs" can get you some interesting hits. Did you know that japanese scientists tried to cross a cow with a whale? What the hell were they trying for?

giant sea going milkers?
horny whales?

the mind wobbles...

http://purpleslinky.com/trivia/science/weird-science/

ReSomething
Jul. 12, 2009, 02:47 PM
So what happened to the lost cattle? You mean nobody herd

Do you know how SLC eventually found the cow?

She tractor down ;)

She saw it standing in the middle of the road and drove into the fence to avoid it. I wondered if it was a Jersey Cow, but she said she didn't know she never saw it's licence plates.

I heard SLC might be arrested back at the ranch for wearing a tafetta and lace dress. She was charged with rustling.

The cow asked her "why don't you shoo those flies". BTR replied "They'd be better barefoot"

So SLC decided to brand the cow. Do you know how it felt? Well it was very impressed.

Anyway I'm not sure if any of this thread is true.

I've a strong sense it's all just a bum steer

Ba-DUM-bum!

slc2
Jul. 12, 2009, 07:08 PM
this one seems to have taken on a life of its own, so I can just keep my feet up and have some popcorn, and I'll keep the 'surprise cow in my front yard' story for next year.

we did drive around a few times looking for the cow, but it was not anywhere near the roads at that point. i wouldn't call us 'actively involved' at all.

MistyBlue
Jul. 12, 2009, 07:11 PM
Good, we'll look forward to it. And by waiting a year you'll have more time to fine tune it for discrepencies. :winkgrin:

Well, now that you edited to add more I'll have to do the same.

I'm trying to figure out how "driving around a few times" and "not actively involved" meshes with all the posts of "we tried everything" for your "good friend" that you're still not sure if he's bred children or not.

slc2
Jul. 12, 2009, 07:13 PM
Not really. Untrue stories are far more likely to not have any discrepancies. Look it up.

MistyBlue
Jul. 12, 2009, 07:23 PM
Well in that case you have my sympathies. It has to be very difficult having to live a life where facts keep changing after the...ummm...fact.

I would be very annoyed if I had actually helped some good friends catch their loose cow that was beloved of their small children...and helped them all day every day for days on end...only to find out months later that what actually happened didn't really happpen and I didn't really know my good friend and since I didn't really know him then I couldn't have known he had children and that all that time and effort I put in months earlier turned out to be a few simple drive bys on paved roads after the cow wandered far off the roads.

However if they ever sell that cow it might be a good idea to market it as an eventer...it has some fancy footwork in evading people and seems to be able to leap in and out of fenced cow pastures at will. I have no idea how they keep it contained now though...since it was easily jumping in and out of pastures.

Bluey
Jul. 12, 2009, 07:27 PM
So what happened to the lost cattle? You mean nobody herd

Do you know how SLC eventually found the cow?

She tractor down ;)

She saw it standing in the middle of the road and drove into the fence to avoid it. I wondered if it was a Jersey Cow, but she said she didn't know she never saw it's licence plates.

I heard SLC might be arrested back at the ranch for wearing a tafetta and lace dress. She was charged with rustling.

The cow asked her "why don't you shoo those flies". BTR replied "They'd be better barefoot"

So SLC decided to brand the cow. Do you know how it felt? Well it was very impressed.

Anyway I'm not sure if any of this thread is true.

I've a strong sense it's all just a bum steer

My, I didn't know you had it in you. Awesome. Carry on.:lol:

Pony Fixer
Jul. 12, 2009, 10:36 PM
Look it up.

Funny, that's exactly what I tell my husband when I'm fibbing....:lol:

MistyBlue
Jul. 12, 2009, 10:43 PM
Not really. Untrue stories are far more likely to not have any discrepancies. Look it up.

Says she in a post that she edited. Again. :winkgrin:


You catch people in lies because they can't keep the story straight. Not because they never waver from the story.

And you're saying if someone tells a story 5-6 times and pertinent facts change 5-6 times then they're telling the truth? :lol: The truth is something that changes so that it's something almost entirely different with each telling?

Editing posts over and over again also doesn't make them truthful. :no:

claire
Jul. 13, 2009, 01:06 AM
SLC2,

Your original post seven months ago:



Anyone in Northeast Ohio know where we can get a tranquilizer gun????

We have a serious problem, and I hope no one thinks this is FUNNY.

My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.

Please PM me, or post here if you have any suggestions or have a gun we can borrow.

And now, seven months later you write:


this one seems to have taken on a life of its own, so I can just keep my feet up and have some popcorn, and I'll keep the 'surprise cow in my front yard' story for next year.

we did drive around a few times looking for the cow, but it was not anywhere near the roads at that point. i wouldn't call us 'actively involved' at all.

You weren't "actively involved"? :confused:

But You started a thread Emergency! Help! Need a Tranq Gun?

And You posted that the cow was Your friend's pet and
Your friend's kids were very upset?

And now you say you heard third hand about some farmer's cow getting loose and you drove around a bit looking for it but weren't actively involved??? :rolleyes:


You initially said you hoped no one thought this was funny.

Well, I don't think anyone found your "story" funny.

Pretty sad, actually, that you need to make stuff up like this for attention.

Although, the ensuing cow humor was great! :lol:

egontoast
Jul. 13, 2009, 08:48 AM
yes, Claire, very weird that the emergency situation/scream for HELP!!!1 EMERGENCY!! where slick was actively involved in the search and rescue,


My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her.

Please PM me, or post here if you have any suggestions or have a gun we can borrow.

came home to dry out before going back to the search party type thing


We have rompun, she won't come up to a feed pan. We put out feed right when it happened, there's still so much green grass, apples and other stuff out that she won't come near any feed that's set out. It's like she just lost her mind. She's normally gentle. I don't know if someone on a horse could get anywhere near her. It's just open fields and she is as wild as a march hare all of a sudden. I think I best chance is to shoot her with a tranquilizer dart. Even at that someone would have to be a hell of a good shot, it's a very long shot Most deer are shot at relatively close distances, long shots are - well - long shots.

At one point she was over five miles away from her paddock.

We came in to warm up, it started to rain so hard we couldn't even see, so we loaded hay for a while.

I'll go back in a while, but right now we are a little rattled.





is now all revealed as fiction and we have this


we did drive around a few times looking for the cow, but it was not anywhere near the roads at that point. i wouldn't call us 'actively involved' at all.



I do hope the nice gullible folks who hang on every word of the accomplished fictiondisguisedasfact writer are following this one.:)

What a HOOT!:lol:

claire
Jul. 13, 2009, 10:50 AM
yes, Claire, very weird that the emergency situation/scream for HELP!!!1 EMERGENCY!! where slick was actively involved in the search and rescue, came home to dry out before going back to the search party type thing

is now all revealed as fiction

I do hope the nice gullible folks who hang on every word of the accomplished fictiondisguisedasfact writer are following this one.:)

What a HOOT!:lol:


I guess the whole thread is Moooo-t? :D

2WBs1TB
Jul. 13, 2009, 12:05 PM
My friend's prize, pet cow got loose on the road, and we can't catch her. We have tried everything. I just got back from there. She is just terrified, we can't get near enough her to catch her. She has gone back and forth across the road several times and almost gotten killed, let alone having nearly caused a couple horrific traffic accidents. We have the local sherrif, a couple vets, and NONE of us know where in the world to find a tranquilizer gun today-right-now. Please help! To top it off we've got a full scale wind and rain storm going and the weather is just really, really not helping.

I realize some people will think it doesn't matter because it's a cow, but she's a pet and my friend's kids really adore her. The kids would be heartbroken if anything happened to her......

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
We have rompun, she won't come up to a feed pan. We put out feed right when it happened, there's still so much green grass, apples and other stuff out that she won't come near any feed that's set out. It's like she just lost her mind. She's normally gentle. I don't know if someone on a horse could get anywhere near her. It's just open fields and she is as wild as a march hare all of a sudden. I think I best chance is to shoot her with a tranquilizer dart. Even at that someone would have to be a hell of a good shot, it's a very long shot Most deer are shot at relatively close distances, long shots are - well - long shots.

At one point she was over five miles away from her paddock.

We came in to warm up, it started to rain so hard we couldn't even see, so we loaded hay for a while.

I'll go back in a while, but right now we are a little rattled.

I went to take the truck back to the house and the brakes went out! What a day!......
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
No, we gave up. Hopefully we have a couple days. The weather promises to be even worse tomorrow.

There is one possibility that she could wander on to his uncle's land and get in with his beef herd. She is just not herdable or drivable.

Roping and cutting horses is meant for confined areas....so are catch panels. I just don't know what to do. The owner is a farmer and they have tried everything they know.

I have one idea, is tethering another age-match heifer in the area and hoping she couples up with the other heifer and then can be caught. The other heifers he has are not very tame, though, I don't know if we could walk any of the others on the road. The poor animal. I know a horse by itself like that is just frantic....
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The heifer has been rescued and is safe. Growing, being a heifer.

The farmer bought a dart gun for 800 dollars or so, I think from some internet outfit, and one of the farm hands shot the heifer from what I thought was an absolutely impossible distance, and got her. He shot two darts, and he believes he got her both times; I believe they found out later that they had given her a rather immense dose all together. Then they got a halter and lead rope on her and waited for her to wake up - I can't recall if they had to put her in a trailer or not, but they got her home, and she's just one of the girls now.

I didn't ask him what happened for the longest time because I just did not want to bring it up. I was thinking it probably had ended very badly. But they are happy, now they have a tranquilizer gun and figure it will come in handy again some day during another cow emergency....


They bought a tranq rifle off the internet?

I think so. I don't think it's a rifle. I didn't ask for a lot of details and don't know the proper terms for such things. Since when? You're usually such an expert on everything! I THINK...but am not sure, that the dart goes in an aim-able, accurate sort of gun that is designed only to shoot tranquilizer darts. Yes, slick, that is called a rifle. Hand guns are not accurate over long distances. I'm sure if you had taken a moment to use your mad goggling skillz you could have eliminated all this "uncertainty"...:rolleyes:

A high powered pro grade that's accurate at fair distances?

He said he shot her from quite a distance, so I would assume it was a pretty good accurate piece of equipment. Someone once told me (my SO's dad, I think) that the average killing shot in hunting is 25 yards. This was about 4 times that, I think. They paced it off because I think the fellow that did it wanted to be sure and tell everyone what a good shot he was...LOL.


And then waited for delivery and used it?

What else could he have done? The cow was out for I believe at the end over a month and a half. They tried a number of different options - none worked.


Was someone in charge of following the cow for the shipping time so they knew where it would be when the rifle came in?

No. I'm quite sure not. It was during the winter, a particularly bitter winter here with average temperatures about half of normal. Yes, the same bitter winter that had lush green grass and lots of apples...and rain.



And the cow didn't calm down at all in the time it took to ship the rifle?

No.....He said that despite there being snow wait, I thought it was raining??? on the ground, there was plenty of feed on the ground and that added to the problem. Yes, all that green grass and apples and stuff that are so easy to find in bitter temperatures with snow on the ground. :rolleyes:


Cows don't normally stay nuts for very long IME.

Well, according to the farmer, this sort of thing isn't actually that unusual. When I first heard about it they ran down the list of various things they had tried - it was rather extensive.

There is a lot of farm land in the area, connected farms, and woods, and an animal would have a great deal of land to run on. In spite of the fact that much of this farm land is no doubt fenced in. :rolleyes: I'm not sure I recall all the details perfectly well, but I think she was spotted on several roads, mixing in with several different farm's herds, ....wonders how she managed that since one would assume the other cows were contained within some sort of fence?... at some distance in with his relative's beef herd on a different farm, and possibly got hit by a car once or twice ...and that didn't slow her down one bit? during that time as well, I can't recall for sure. Yes, one would imagine it's hard to keep your lies straight after all this time.


A few hours to maybe a day or so.

Well maybe you haven't been on this farm, in this area, and seen this particular cow.


Usually a rope and a horse slightly faster than a cow works a lot better, faster and cheaper.

Sure...I've actually heard people laugh at the idea of catching cattle with horses on rough, wooded ground, either by cutting or roping, where there is a lot of cover. You can't get a rope on an animal when there are trees everywhere. Roping was not designed for country where cattle can that easily get up in the woods where trees are 3 feet apart.

This fellow is a very experienced dairy farmer, most of his relatives also run cattle, either dairy or beef, and he knows what he is doing. I can't recall for sure, but I do believe at one point they tried horses. You have to try and understand the lay of the land around there. It did not work. This guy is very experienced and has access to people who work cattle (there are some very good ropers around here who compete and work cattle)

Others said he should have shot the cow, and that it was a very expensive way to deal with it.

I was VERY surprised to find out that they had bought such an expensive piece of equipment to dart the animal, but I think either due to possible liability or just being a big old softie, such as the guy didn't want to see the animal get hit by a truck or otherwise die an awful death, so he was pretty determined to catch her.


People have been catching loose, wild, loco cattle like that since forever.

They haven't caught all of them. Yeah, slick is still on the loose, but we're on to her now!

I wouldn't call her loco. She wasn't eating any toxic weeds that would lead her to be loco. She just got loose some how (no, I don't recall how, just got out the fence, I think) and like many animals do when they get loose, her behavior changed. I've seen dogs get hurt or frightened and get wild and wary of people in just a day or so, where they couldn't be approached and would act like they didn't even know their owners - it isn't really that impossible.

Nojacketrequired
Jul. 13, 2009, 12:46 PM
We put out feed right when it happened, there's still so much green grass, apples and other stuff out that she won't come near any feed that's set out.

The cow OBVIOUSLY was on her way to that other poster's place who echews grain and only feeds fruits, vegies grass and herbs.

NJR

Auventera Two
Jul. 13, 2009, 03:26 PM
SLC lives in the Midwest. We can have 60 degrees and rain one day, then 30 degrees and a blizzard the next. Our falls are cool and rainy, which means abundant grass growth that lasts sometimes into the beginning of December. As for apples - unless you pick them up, they just lay on the ground until they rott. Depending on the species of tree, you can have apples on the ground in December, easily. The deer will come and eat them, even if they're brown and withered up into little rotted pucks.

When I got married, it was 70 degrees right up until the wedding day - then it dropped to 34 degrees, started raining, and ended up at about 28 and snow. A couple days later it warmed back up to 70. Murphy's law, I guess. :sadsmile: I have photos of a snow storm that dropped 8" in May. And I'd already mowed my grass twice that year! Believe me, it happens.

I haven't followed this thread, but I saw the post above about the weather, and thought I'd chime in. The weather in the midwest can be very unpredictable, unfortunately. We don't get this lovely temperate climate that so many are accustomed to.

Somewhere around October, start watching the Horse Care forum and you'll see what I mean. Lots of threads wondering how to blanket horses because it starts out at 12 degrees and then warms up to 75 by afternoon. Or it starts out at 60 and drops to 7 before you get off work. Or they don't know about clipping or stalling because one day it's raining then the next day freezing and icy. The forum is full of these posts every year. We've had years of subzero temps then a January thaw where everything is flooding and it RAINS for 3 straight days. Then it drops to subzero again and everything is a frozen ice rink.

There is an internet joke that circulates - you know you live in Wisconsin if you design your kid's halloween costume to fit over a snow suit - if you shovel snow before work, then mow your grass that night - if you snowblow your roof, etc.........

SLC isn't too far from here so it's certainly not far fetched that her winters would be very similar to this.

hitchinmygetalong
Jul. 13, 2009, 04:23 PM
Gee, that was really helpful, Auventera. However, the last time I looked at a map, northeast Ohio (which is where I believe slc2 is living) is several states and two great lakes away from Wisconsin. Those bodies of water have a way of screwing with the weather.

The point about the weather was to illustrate inconsistencies in the cow story, not to show how fickle it can be.

mp
Jul. 13, 2009, 04:46 PM
No matter where you live in the great "Midwest," it's a good bet that the grass is not green nor overly yummy in November. The temps can fluctuate and be warm, but the lush is all gone, kids. It is in my neck of the Midwest and I live in what my former neighbors in Wisconsin thought was "the south" -- Kansas. :lol:

Of course, they also thought I had a drawl and my accent is truly "pure Walter Cronkite" -- as in negligible. Those folks really needed to get out more.

egontoast
Jul. 13, 2009, 05:19 PM
The weather thing is irrelevant.

Read all slc's posts on this thread.

The story is bogus regardless of the weather.:lol:

class
Jul. 13, 2009, 11:03 PM
too, many people from the midwest have a hard time differentiating between some neighbor's farmer's farmhand's kids running around and their very close friend's children.

Antaeus
Jul. 14, 2009, 12:01 AM
well, googling for "cows on drugs" can get you some interesting hits. Did you know that japanese scientists tried to cross a cow with a whale? What the hell were they trying for?

giant sea going milkers?
horny whales?

the mind wobbles...

http://purpleslinky.com/trivia/science/weird-science/

:eek::eek:

Lady Counselor
Jul. 14, 2009, 10:59 AM
Ya know...personally I can't stand people who make up crap. Maybe you think it's all fun and games, but it's dishonesty. And dishonest people can't be trusted in any way, personally or professionally.
Not the kind of person I would hire for my horse needs. Not the kind of person I would want as a friend. Not the kind of person I would want to work with.
Remember the story about the OTTB mare, the logging truck and the dead cows?
Seriously, WTF was the point of that?
If you don't have self respect enough to be honest, you don't have much in this world.

CatOnLap
Jul. 14, 2009, 01:27 PM
c'mon Lady C, I still have some of those logging truck massacreee cowz in my freezer!

hitchinmygetalong
Jul. 14, 2009, 01:50 PM
Lady Counselor, I'm in total agreement. Sadly, it seems to be a Chronicle Forums tradition. Were you around for the Musical Jumper debacle? That really knocked us on our heels for a while and turned a lot of trusting people into very wary skeptics. Some people read our responses as "nasty" and "unsupportive" but there are some long-time posters here who have a great talent for sniffing out a tall tale.

Some posters don't exactly out-and-out lie, but they will turn another's true story into their own real-life experience, like having watched some horse perform some incredible feat when in reality that horse was on another continent and in another era. It's quite amazing to watch the spin they can put on stories.

Sadly, I'm not talented enough to lie. My memory is faulty at best and I'm very forgetful of names and whatnot, but a deliberate lie? That's very hard for me to do. I blame my inability to lie on my father, who always preached a tough sermon on telling the truth. It's a hard habit to break.

arabhorse2
Jul. 14, 2009, 02:44 PM
Hitch, let's not forget the Chanter debacle, either. Some poor farm owner got threatened with bodily harm because of that freakshow, and some people's inability to discern fact from fiction.

So yeah, if folks around here seem skeptical or even downright hostile to certain posters and their stories, it's not without reason.

If something sounds too fantastic, insane, or just looney tunes incredible, chances are it only happened in the mind of the OP.

This mooo-ving tale appears to be one of them.

Thomas_1
Jul. 14, 2009, 05:08 PM
SLC lives in the Midwest. Our falls are cool and rainy, which means abundant grass growth that lasts sometimes into the beginning of December. As for apples - unless you pick them up, they just lay on the ground until they rott. Depending on the species of tree, you can have apples on the ground in December, easily. The deer will come and eat them, even if they're brown and withered up into little rotted pucks.

When I got married, it was 70 degrees right up until the wedding day - then it dropped to 34 degrees, started raining, and ended up at about 28 and snow. A couple days later it warmed back up to 70. Murphy's law, I guess. :sadsmile: I have photos of a snow storm that dropped 8" in May. And I'd already mowed my grass twice that year! Believe me, it happens.

I haven't followed this thread, but I saw the post above about the weather, and thought I'd chime in. The weather in the midwest can be very unpredictable, unfortunately. We don't get this lovely temperate climate that so many are accustomed to.

Somewhere around October, start watching the Horse Care forum and you'll see what I mean. Lots of threads wondering how to blanket horses because it starts out at 12 degrees and then warms up to 75 by afternoon. Or it starts out at 60 and drops to 7 before you get off work. Or they don't know about clipping or stalling because one day it's raining then the next day freezing and icy. The forum is full of these posts every year. We've had years of subzero temps then a January thaw where everything is flooding and it RAINS for 3 straight days. Then it drops to subzero again and everything is a frozen ice rink.

There is an internet joke that circulates - you know you live in Wisconsin if you design your kid's halloween costume to fit over a snow suit - if you shovel snow before work, then mow your grass that night - if you snowblow your roof, etc.........

SLC isn't too far from here so it's certainly not far fetched that her winters would be very similar to this. I heard it rained cats, dogs and cows where SlC lives. Heck she even stepped in a poodle.

Do you know what happens to cows in an earthquake? ............. Milkshake!


Enough of the jokes though. I thought I'd finish the story. Did you know that SLC's neigher went out to his field one morning only to find the entire herd of neighbours cows frozen solid. As far as the eye can see are cows, motionless like statues.

It had been a bitterly cold night, but he'd never thought anything like this would happen. Not even in this part of the USA where the weather is prone to plague and pestulence, blizzard and heat wave and all in one day.

The realization of the situation then dawned on him. With all the livestock gone, how would they make ends meet? How would they feed the kids? How would he pay the mortgage? He sat with his head in his hands, trying to come to terms with her neighbour's impending poverty. Just then, an elderly woman called Slcwalked by, 'What's the matter?' asked the old lady.

The farmer gestured toward the frozen cows and explained his predicament to the woman.

Without hesitation the old woman smiled and began to rub one of the cows' noses. After a few seconds the cow began to twitch and was soon back to normal and chewing the cud.

One by one, the old woman defrosted the cows until the whole field was full of healthy animals. The farmer was delighted and asked Slc what she wanted as a repayment for her deed.

She declined his offer and walked off across the field. A passer-by who had witnessed the whole thing approached the farmer. 'You know who that was don't you?' asked the passer-by.

'No' said the farmer 'who is she?'

(Wait for it) .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ................



'That was Thora Hird.'

GettingBack
Jul. 14, 2009, 05:47 PM
Not really. Untrue stories are far more likely to not have any discrepancies. Look it up.

What????

I think the sad thing about this story is that it does jade us posters to the next person who really DOES have an emergency for some poor farm animal but the situation seems funny.

THAT'S sad. It's a disservice to the board.

Keeping it farm/cow related...I once successfully herded a cow back into a pen with a car and a friend on a tractor. The cow was in the middle of a rural highway. It wasn't easy, but it wasn't impossible either - maybe I should switch to cutting.

I also have seen the damage cattle can do to a car.

*sigh*

egontoast
Jul. 14, 2009, 06:07 PM
I also have seen the damage cattle can do to a car.


Especially when they are drunk and hormonal.

Queen Latisha
Jul. 14, 2009, 06:13 PM
So this whole story is fiction?
Why I'm I not surprised?:lol:

GettingBack
Jul. 14, 2009, 06:21 PM
*muses* I've never seen a drunken cow. Well, not of the actual bovine sort.

But I have seen drunken horses before - two giant Belgians in an apple orchard. They were eating all of the fermenting apples on the ground. They were hysterical, albeit a tad dangerous, galloping around bucking and farting.

MistyBlue
Jul. 14, 2009, 07:27 PM
Also not a big fan of the wanting attention fiction that pops up on here from time to time. I remember Musical Jumper...yeesh, what a fiasco. Chanter, another major mess that screwed over a lot of people. The highway bovine massacre one was both hilarious and ridiculous. Accusing the entire BB of sending death threats via email. A horse being euthanized for corns...I think that poster was reading too many children's fiction books. Pretending to have a serious illness. One that really went overboard was the latest raped in a church by a stalker crap. Who the hell writes that for attention??? :eek:
Some of the story tellers just disappear after they realize nobody believes their tall tales. Some disappear for a short time and pop back up under a new name. And some just slink away and then slink back and hope nobody notices. :rolleyes:
What I've always wondered was why are some people sooooo desperate for attention that they'll not only make up the most inane stuff but they'll also not be able to resist constant returns to a BB where they made an arse out of themselves? :confused: Or that they'll keep searching for posts where anyone mentions their screen names in order to comment themselves so as to get attention back on themselves again.

goeslikestink
Jul. 14, 2009, 07:43 PM
this one seems to have taken on a life of its own, so I can just keep my feet up and have some popcorn, and I'll keep the 'surprise cow in my front yard' story for next year.

we did drive around a few times looking for the cow, but it was not anywhere near the roads at that point. i wouldn't call us 'actively involved' at all.

what for 7 months -------------- is that what you call ground driving !

egontoast
Jul. 14, 2009, 07:50 PM
But I have seen drunken horses before - two giant Belgians in an apple orchard. They were eating all of the fermenting apples on the ground. They were hysterical, albeit a tad dangerous, galloping around bucking and farting


I think that may be normal behavior for Belgians. I've got one here. He's a wild man even while sober.

goeslikestink
Jul. 14, 2009, 08:00 PM
SLC isn't too far from here so it's certainly not far fetched that her winters would be very similar to this.[/QUOTE]

so the cow swims into and onto another page into and onto another charactor
chapter ---- of said books of fiction you do well as a co writer

JSwan
Jul. 14, 2009, 08:55 PM
Especially when they are drunk and hormonal.

Do you know how to make a hormone?





Don't pay her.

Quin
Jul. 14, 2009, 08:59 PM
Um.......maybe we need to use that trank gun on JSwan? OUCH :D

JSwan
Jul. 14, 2009, 09:01 PM
OUCH :D


Figured since we were trading jokes I'd drag out that old chestnut. :lol:

egontoast
Jul. 17, 2009, 09:43 AM
I've been learning so much on this helpful thread so I'd like to add some more advice for others.

Never NEver EVER wear your best Georg Schumacher fullseats whilst tracking a rogue bovine through the shubbery. Don't ask me how I know this!

Long Spot
Jul. 17, 2009, 12:55 PM
I love this thread.

That is all.

GettingBack
Jul. 17, 2009, 01:27 PM
Never NEver EVER wear your best Georg Schumacher fullseats whilst tracking a rogue bovine through the shubbery. Don't ask me how I know this!

Coffee on the screen-worthy, was that statement.

Pony Fixer
Jul. 17, 2009, 02:11 PM
eggy one must not use any punctuation or capitals while tracking said bovine in the ribbed Schumachers

egontoast
Jul. 18, 2009, 04:42 PM
So what would be the recommended attire for this activity?

Are fullseats completely out?

What about Kevlar coveralls and hip waders?

I'm putting together a KPBRARK ( krazy pet bovine run amok recovery kit) to carry in my vehicle at all times.

JSwan
Jul. 18, 2009, 05:51 PM
Hunt whip.

(I helped my Mennonite neighbors corral some loose heifers with my hunt whip. Blocked the road with my dually and snapped the whip a few times to send 'em back to the boys. Heifers went back into their field and I helped the boys patch up the downed fence. No tranquilizers were involved. Actually... the whole incident isn't even worth commenting on except for the use of the hunt whip - I thought that was pretty quick thinking on my part. And it does go nicely with full seats. And heels. :cool:)

MistyBlue
Jul. 18, 2009, 07:35 PM
But what if you are a WIMP like me? Whip Impaired Moronic Person? I snap a whip and flay parts off myself. :no:
Unless I can scare loose cows into doing what I want by maiming myself...I'm thinking a sidearm and BBQ sauce are a better bet for me.
I guess I could try tackling a cow...cowboys do it all the time. I've seen it on TV. Maybe it's better to slow the cow down by having a moronic person dangling off it's head trying to remember how the cowboys on TV got them to flip over?

JSwan
Jul. 18, 2009, 08:39 PM
Maybe it's better to slow the cow down by having a moronic person dangling off it's head......


Mmm... best person to answer that would be SLC.

egontoast
Jul. 18, 2009, 10:12 PM
That is likely very true but I have another question.

Are cattle prods totally outre except in certain consenting adult type encounters or would they have any application in the above descibed rogue heifer run amok scenario? :confused:

Thomas_1
Jul. 19, 2009, 08:21 AM
I'm sure I read an udderly ridiculous article in a moosletter saying that PETA were trying to herd people to lobby to ban cattle prods. Their reputation is already in tatters so the steaks are high so I'm thinking this is just grazey talk. But they cud be all just off topic and I don't want to get booted off for telling the offal truth.

I'll say goodbye for now because the weather is fresian here so I'm going off on holiday to sunny Cyprus.

CatOnLap
Jul. 19, 2009, 10:47 AM
Don't believe him. Thomas is off to HIDE somewhere as be-HOOVES someone who makes such CrUDDY puns.

And hopefully, that's the end of this TAIL.

MOO!

egontoast
Jul. 29, 2009, 07:56 PM
Interesting thread. One of my neighbour's cows got out the other day. Funny thing . No one ran to the internet to look for tranquilizer guns! :lol:

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2009, 08:43 PM
Whatever did they do then? Apparently there is no other way to catch a cow. People, vehicles, ropes nor horses have any chances of catching a loose cow.

JoZ
Jul. 30, 2009, 01:17 AM
What about shouting SOOOOOOOEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE? Or does that only work for pigs? Perhaps it should be MOOOOOOOOEEEEEEEEEEEEEE?

I guess I had an unrealistic view of the American Cowboy... sad to find out that it was all a myth, and the cattle pretty much ran amok.

arktos19
Jul. 31, 2009, 01:47 PM
Figured since we were trading jokes I'd drag out that old chestnut. :lol:

Alternative answer:

Hide the tube of KY.... :D

chaltagor
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:00 PM
I just took a trip to KY where there were a lot of cows and I knew if called upon I would be ready to help herd up any loose ones after this thread. I even skimmed over it for any tips I may have missed. But no such luck. Anyway, I'm locked and loaded just in case. :yes:

TheRedFox
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:18 PM
A dart is not going to travel very far anyway. You have to be at close range to use one and it doesnt sound like ya'll can get in close range to her. Your best bet is going to be finding a roper, I think. DNR might be able to help but I think a couple of swift riding cowpokes are going to be able to do the trick. Best of luck; I'm sure she will be back and safe and sound before too long.

MHM
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:34 PM
I'm sure she will be back and safe and sound before too long.

Welcome to the BB! :)

One little tip- before you reply to a long thread, you may want to check the date on the original post. ;)

egontoast
Aug. 26, 2009, 09:39 PM
Oh well, that's OK.

We are still jingling like mad for the wayward bovine anyway.

WWYD?
Aug. 27, 2009, 01:16 AM
Speaking of waywards, I hope slc2 (the OP) is o.k. It is rare that she misses 4 days of posting. Jingles?

MistyBlue
Aug. 27, 2009, 08:06 AM
I'm guessing computer troubles...she had a few posts that ended in "eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!" So either computer troubles or someone/something carried her off and she was screaming for help.
Ms Freda disappeared around the same time though. :confused:
Maybe jingles are needed?
The Blare Witch of Coth has stricken and is carrying off members one by one? :eek:




Or would that be the Mare Witch? The Blare Mare?





Hold me.





I'm scared.

JSwan
Aug. 27, 2009, 08:09 AM
Ms. Freda is actually Valerie Plame. Someone blew her cover. Again.

It's tough being an operative.

SLC was run over by a heifer that got loose in her indoor arena.

egontoast
Aug. 27, 2009, 08:12 AM
I have it from a good source that someone is sorting pet cows today in an enclosed area. Apparently one can get strap-on horns for the Verhans.

MistyBlue
Aug. 27, 2009, 08:16 AM
Wait a minute Eggy and JSwan...in the enclosed indoor? Cows?

No wonder she had such a long list of indoor rules.

Maybe that's why her last post ended in "eeeeeee." Maybe it was the tail end of a "Whheeeeeeeeeeeeeeee" from chasing cows?

So no Blare Mare? Phew!

TheRedFox
Aug. 27, 2009, 08:43 AM
Welcome to the BB! :)

One little tip- before you reply to a long thread, you may want to check the date on the original post. ;)

Oh Yikes! LOL, looks like I'm a little late. I just saw the EMERGENCY! and jumped on the wagon without looking at the date. :)