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View Full Version : Help my buy my trailer! Hawk Rumber Floors?



purplnurpl
Oct. 27, 2008, 11:52 AM
I'm actually posting to ask about the Hawk Rumber floors. What the heck?

What have you guys liked the most?
alum?
wood?
and now Rumber?
too many choices!!!

Here's what I want:

~3 horse slant
~stock combo (I'm in TX)
~steel frame if possible
~4 foot wide dividers
~extra 6" in length per divider
(so extra length within the trailer and extra width per each horsie slot)
~8' wide (so no fenders)
~rear tack
~mangers

a reverse slant sure would be nice.

small goose neck part for my bed and maybe a microwave/cabinet that I will build myself.
Is the shortest wall a 4' wall?

I have not chosen a manufacturer.

Janet
Oct. 29, 2008, 04:01 PM
I love my rumber floor.

I REALLY like not haveing mats, as I have one horse that always manages to shift the mats.

CJBean
Oct. 29, 2008, 05:48 PM
Hawk are wonderful trailers! But I would stay away from the Rumber floor, I have heard from people that they do not wear evenly and you can end up with dips in the floor. Also Hawk offers lifetime warranty on their wood floors and I think its only seven year warranty with the rumber floor?? You can correct me on that, but I know the rumber floor does not have a lifetime warranty.

I ended up going with the wood floor and really the mats are not that heavy. I am able to drag them in and out of the trailer myself no problem.

Plus I just like having that lifetime warranty on the floor.

flypony74
Oct. 29, 2008, 06:11 PM
When I was shopping for the trailer I have now, whatever I bought was going to have either WERM or Rumber flooring. My gelding pees on the trailer a lot, and I was sick of pulling mats. I liked both Rumber and WERM, but ended up with a 4-Star with factory installed WERM. It has been GREAT....so easy to maintain, and no worries about urine destroying the floor. I will never have another trailer with a straight up aluminum or wood floor.

Hawk makes a nice trailer. When I was shopping, I was going back and forth between a new Hawk or a slightly used 4-Star. I really preferred the 4-Star, but couldn't afford a new one, and wasn't sure if I'd find a used one with the specs I was after. I was just about to order a Hawk when I found my trailer....slightly used 4-Star with the configuration and all the options I wanted, at the right price. I have been very, very happy with it.

Mine is 7' wide, and the the trailer is configured as such that the slant stalls are plenty roomy even for large horses. My mares are really long, and I often haul friend's larger horses, but I didn't want an 8' wide because it is a PITA to see around, and I hate it when the wheel wells come into the horse compartment (mine come in maybe 2"). The angle and width of the slant stalls make a difference and can add a substantial amount of room. I have a regular slant versus a reverse and am happy with it...see no need for the reverse, horses ride fine on this config.

Looking at a coupe of options that you are considering..... You don't necessarily need a stock combo for good ventilation. Get head drops (with bars, of course) and BUTT drops, or at least a drop in the rear door. That really pulls the air through when you have the heads dropped. We get hot in TN, too, and with my rear window dropped, no one has ever sweated in my trailer. I plan to install fans on a 12v in the event we are ever stranded with horses on the trailer, but when we are moving, all those windows really do a good job (4-Stars have HUGE windows). Regarding mangers....bletch. I don't like them, and use the fabric type feeders instead. Mangers on a slant are handy if you need the storage underneath, until a horse decides to climb in one. They also make the trailer seem more confined and less inviting, to me, anyway. Rear tack rocks, but check the angle of it. Some have very abrupt angles, which leave a good place for a person to get pinned, or create a tunnel like effect for loading. The angle on my rear tack is very shallow, so the rear stall is huge, making it very inviting and easy for a person to get in and out of there if need be.

A few things to consider....a stud divider on the first stall, combined with an escape door, makes a super handy place for transporting hay, buckets, muck equipment, etc, if you are not hauling 3 horses. That stud divider (or "stuff" divider, as my trailer guy calls it) is the best thing since sliced bread. Also, 4-Star offers low position latched on their drop windows, which is great for short people like me. Those windows are big and heavy (which I love....I HATE slants that have those tiny drops), and that makes them very manageable. Check things like divider latches, etc, and make sure you can operate them with one hand. Look at hinges and welds.....big, stout, and clean are good indicators of quality. Look at how close the I-beams are positioned under the floor. A high quality aluminum trailer will be just as strong as one with a steel frame (although it won't be terribly light), so don't limit yourself to the hybrids. My old trailer was a hybrid from a reputable manufacturer, and was 1000x more flimsy than my all-aluminum 4-Star...this thingis built like a tank.

You need to crawl all over a bunch of trailer and figure out what manufacturers you prefer, and which options are most practical for your needs. Have fun!

CA ASB
Oct. 31, 2008, 12:36 AM
Even Reesa, from Happy Trails, one of Hawk's best dealers recommends the wood floors. And yep, they have a lifetime warranty. Mats are easy take in and out as well.

flypony74
Oct. 31, 2008, 12:53 AM
Mats are easy take in and out as well.

I have never met a mat that was easy to take out/in. Biggest PITA in the world.

jumpingbrandy
Oct. 31, 2008, 01:30 PM
I have a Dream Coach with the Rumber floor and absolutely love it. The horses don't slip on it and there are no mats to pull up to clean.

2bee
Oct. 31, 2008, 02:15 PM
Even Reesa, from Happy Trails, one of Hawk's best dealers recommends the wood floors. And yep, they have a lifetime warranty. Mats are easy take in and out as well.



I have never met a mat that was easy to take out/in. Biggest PITA in the world.

I would stick with the wood floors also..........there is no such thing as a mat that is easy to take in and out.

On a side note, there is little reason to actually take the mats out. Just fold them to one side, wash, let dry.......repeat for the other side.

Janet
Oct. 31, 2008, 06:31 PM
The PROBLEM with mats is that they are TOO easy to move.

If I put Music in a trailer with mats, she has shifted the mat and is standing on the bare floor before we leave the driveway. She has been known to fall down as she pushes the mats around.

With the Rumber floor, there is nothing to shift, and she doesn't lose her balance.

2bee
Oct. 31, 2008, 07:22 PM
The PROBLEM with mats is that they are TOO easy to move.

If I put Music in a trailer with mats, she has shifted the mat and is standing on the bare floor before we leave the driveway. She has been known to fall down as she pushes the mats around.

With the Rumber floor, there is nothing to shift, and she doesn't lose her balance.

Were the mats a "custom fit", or say a 6' wide mat on a 6' 3" floor? If they were a custom fit why were the floors so slick?

Janet
Oct. 31, 2008, 07:26 PM
Were the mats a "custom fit", or say a 6' wide mat on a 6' 3" floor? If they were a custom fit why were the floors so slick?
The mats were properly fited, and the wood floor waws not particularly slick.

Basically, she likes to "sit" on the butt bar, so there is practically no weight on her hind feet. The first time she braces her front feet, they, and the mat, shift forward. Then she moves back, sits on the butt bar, and does it again.

I even tried heavy weight velcro, but it didn't help.

Rumber solved it though.

Elisha
Oct. 31, 2008, 09:35 PM
Even Reesa, from Happy Trails, one of Hawk's best dealers recommends the wood floors. And yep, they have a lifetime warranty. Mats are easy take in and out as well.

Check out Reesa's blog on Rumber - http://happytrailstrailers.blogspot.com/2008/03/is-rumber-worth-it.html

deltawave
Oct. 31, 2008, 09:39 PM
God, my mats are only moveable with heavy equipment. They do not BUDGE, ever. Taking them out is a herculean effort, and I hate it.

I'd really like to hear more about the WERM . . . any good websites discussing it?

Tom King
Nov. 2, 2008, 09:55 PM
I choose not to do mats. Rumber is my choice. Yes you have the supports closer together than for wood. I don't care about comparing anyone's guarantee of lifetime for wood to 25 years for Rumber. I know two horses (not ours thankfully) with ruined feet from going through wooden floors and none for Rumber.

Rumber is not a "Hawk" product. It's a Rumber product. http://www.rumber.com/

Leave wet manure on a wooden floor and it will rot at some point. Leave wet manure on an aluminum floor and it will corrode at some point. Leave wet manure on a Rumber or WERM floor and it will stink until it drys out.

flypony74
Nov. 2, 2008, 10:12 PM
God, my mats are only moveable with heavy equipment. They do not BUDGE, ever. Taking them out is a herculean effort, and I hate it.

I hear ya, sister! I had mats in my old trailer and they were a nightmare to move.


I'd really like to hear more about the WERM . . . any good websites discussing it?

Do a search on the forums at horsetrailerworld.com and some threads will come up. My trailer has a factory installed WERM floor and I am extremely happy with it. It is essentially like a heavy duty rhino lining (but much thicker) that is poured in like concrete rather than sprayed in. It seals the floor and is designed to be used without mats. My trailer has a marine-grade aluminum floor but my gelding pees on the trailer almost every trip (2-3x a week), and with the WERM, he can pee all he wants. I just pick out the poo and the wet spot, sweep leftover wet shavings out, and let dry. Once every month or two, I spray it out. Easy easy easy. I do recommend using shavings, because since the floor is sealed, when they pee it will run all over the place....shavings will absorb it.

My gelding is a slightly obnoxious PercheronX with size 4 shoes, and no amount of pawing with those huge feet seems to be able to damage this floor. My trailer is an '05 that was used probably 10x before I got it last August, but I've used the crap out of it since then, and the floor looks great. Love it.

mommy peanut
Dec. 18, 2008, 08:11 PM
Even Reesa, from Happy Trails, one of Hawk's best dealers recommends the wood floors. And yep, they have a lifetime warranty. Mats are easy take in and out as well.

When was this? Just asking because I just bought another trailer from her & based on what I needed, she said to go with the rumber flooring. I have it in another trailer(Hawk) & wouldn't think to go back to wood. It also comes with a 25 year gaurentee.
I put just a small amount of savings down for the horses that like to pee in the trailer. I clean it out with a manure fork during heavy use(summer). I pressure wash it once a year & haven't had ANY problems or difficulty getting it clean. I found wood floors harder as manure, dirty bedding always seems to get stuck in the side-wall matting, ect. Each to their own I guess.

CJBean
Dec. 18, 2008, 09:32 PM
I could have sworn the warranty on the rumber floors wasn't that long. I purchased a new Hawk trailer this past summer and I thought about putting the rumber floor in but was discouraged by my dealer as he told me that there were issues with the rumber floors getting dips in them over time and not wearing evenly.

I did just check on Hawk's webpage and they state it is a 20 year warranty on the rumber floor. I would feel pretty confident with a 20 year warranty. But I could have sworn it wasn't that long of a warranty before, maybe I was just misinformed.

Boomer
Dec. 19, 2008, 09:29 AM
I had a 2H SXS with a Rumber floor - it was wonderful!!

But I had to sell it as I needed a trailer with a small weekender. So I looked for used Hawks with Rumber and they were far and few between. I finally found a used Hawk nearby but with a wood floor and the dreaded mats. They are soooo heavy. I hate pulling them in and out to clean. I looked at replacing the wood with Rumber but I will have to add additional angle iron supports to accomodate Rumber's smaller center requirements. Not a big deal... it's just money right? ;) Maybe that's why I still have the wood floor:D

grayarabpony
Dec. 19, 2008, 06:26 PM
I have a Hawk, and never had any trouble with mats shifting -- and if my horse could do something annoying like that, I'm sure he would.

I like wood because the floors are easy to repair/ replace when needed.

RunningwaterWBs
Dec. 19, 2008, 07:29 PM
A woman I knew who had a Hawk had terrible problems with the door latches (the ones on the people doors). They would fly open without warning. We constantly had to keep an eye on the trailer and would usually see a door pop open, quite frequently on the highway. She spoke with a Hawk rep and was told the door latches were subbed out, so there was no warranty, but she could pay to replace them. This trailer is maybe between 7 and 10 years old at this point. Hopefully they've cleared up the problem by now, but the experience was enough to steer me away from the brand.

GollyGee
Dec. 19, 2008, 07:35 PM
Wood floors tranfer less heat, deaden road noise and are friendly to legs.
Easier to replace and you shouldn't be moving mats out and cleaning the floors that often!! Its bad for the floors and supports. 2-3 times year is enough.
If the mats were going to shift, shipping race TBs to and from as well as stallions and occasionally mare w/ foal would have lifted mine. Those rims and heel sticks can do damage.
My husband researched trailers until it took to joy out of buying one. BUT we learned alot about every manufacturer not just what the dealers tell you!!!

Bluey
Dec. 19, 2008, 08:48 PM
I have rumber in my stocktrailer and it is great to clean.
You can sweep it or hose it down and that's all.
Mine has a guarantee on the rumber as long as the trailer for the original owner.
The shop that made it said rumber costs more because they space the bars underneath closer for it.
If someone has dips in the rumber floor, I wonder if it was installed over the regular wood spacing and that is why?

We used to have wood floors and would go by a roofing company and have them mop roofing tar over the wood and we would pour sand over that and that made for very good floor and saved the lumber longer than mats.

tobruk
Dec. 19, 2008, 11:00 PM
We've never had an unhappy customer with either Rumber or WERM. Both are good. WERM can be applied after the fact. Rumber does require closer crossmembers that most trailers would not call for initially. I'm pretty sure Rumber is a 20 yr warranty while WERM is 10 years. Fixing is easier with WERM but we've never had a problem to fix in either product in 25 yrs. Depending on the trailer size, Rumber is a little more expensive.

grayarabpony
Dec. 20, 2008, 10:08 AM
The door latch problem must have been fixed -- that has not been a problem with our trailer. In addition, the doors have both deadbolts and handle locks.

Stacie
Dec. 20, 2008, 01:53 PM
We've never had an unhappy customer with either Rumber or WERM. Both are good. WERM can be applied after the fact. Rumber does require closer crossmembers that most trailers would not call for initially. I'm pretty sure Rumber is a 20 yr warranty while WERM is 10 years. Fixing is easier with WERM but we've never had a problem to fix in either product in 25 yrs. Depending on the trailer size, Rumber is a little more expensive.
How would the closer supports for rumber affect the ride for the horses?

ponygirl
Dec. 20, 2008, 02:31 PM
A woman I knew who had a Hawk had terrible problems with the door latches (the ones on the people doors). They would fly open without warning. We constantly had to keep an eye on the trailer and would usually see a door pop open, quite frequently on the highway. She spoke with a Hawk rep and was told the door latches were subbed out, so there was no warranty, but she could pay to replace them. This trailer is maybe between 7 and 10 years old at this point. Hopefully they've cleared up the problem by now, but the experience was enough to steer me away from the brand.


I've had this problem with my DR door. So I use the dead bolt to lock it an that works. For the other doors, I have butterfly latches as well so they can't open unexpectedly.

ThreeFigs
Dec. 20, 2008, 07:06 PM
I loooove my new Hawk trailer, though I think I ordered it a little on the large side. I could haul elephants in this thing. It's a side-load/reverse two horse GN, and I wanted to be SURE there'd be enough room to load horses with ease. I went with the wood floor, on Resa's recommendation. No problems with doors flying open. Butterfly latches and every door locks with a key if you want to.

Great workmanship, and Resa's great to work with.