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View Full Version : Quick! How many bales of hay fit in the back of a pickup truck?



subk
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:47 PM
Will the truck get 15 bales or do I need to take my trailer too? (It's less than a 5 mile trip...)

SeeHowSheRuns
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:48 PM
15 bales should be no problem!

jump4it
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:48 PM
Do you have straps for the hay? I would just bring the trailer to be safe, it is only 5 miles.

nikki3
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:48 PM
You shouldn't have any problem fitting 15 bales in a regular sized pickup truck bed. You my want to take some straps to tie them down.

Simkie
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:49 PM
I've seen people drive around with 30+ bales in the back of a pickup. As long as you don't mind stacking high or wide, you should be fine.

Luvinfoofy
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:49 PM
You should be fine with just the truck - I've squeezed in many more than 15!

whaat
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:49 PM
14 fits perfect in ours. Six in the bed and eight on top of them.

subk
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:50 PM
You guys are great! Thanks.

flypony74
Oct. 22, 2008, 12:51 PM
I can get close to 40 in my F250 with a short bed. Fifteen will be easy peasy. And I've never lost a bale yet!

My friend's husband has a Ford Ranger, and I think she gets something like 25 on it!

secretariat
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:06 PM
52 on a full size truck with 8' bed, 35 on a mini. But you have to know how to stack.

Trevelyan96
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:10 PM
Yep... we get 54 on our F250 long bed. But DH is a strap addict, so they are strapped down better than a bridge.

Rivendell Horses
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:11 PM
we get around 40 on our truck. good stacking and bungees cords :)

Everythingbutwings
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:15 PM
Standard bed (8') we get 11 in the bed with the tail gate down, 4 behind the cab, 3 between the wheels and 4 on the tailgate all lengthwise to the bed. Make sure the ones on the tailgate are fanned out.

Next row gets the opposite direction, 2 behind the cab meeting in the middle of the truck with the left and right ends on the side of the truck bed, then two more, two more and two more for 5 rows (10 bales). The last two don't fully cover the ones on the tailgate, they overlap them, though.

This continues with the next layers until you are at the level of the top of the cab. The next layer starts 1/2 bale back, overlapping the 4 bales underneath and is only 6 bales.

The last layer is three bales down the middle in the same direction as the ones underneath but again, set back 1/2 bale from the ones underneath and each top bale overlapping the 4 bales beneath.

That's 50 bales on a standard bed pickup. We run a tow strap from the front bumper over the top down the middle and fasten it to the middle of the rear of the truck, underneath the bumper. Don't crank down the tow strap too much or you create a "spring" that will kablooey your bales out if you hit a dip in the road. :)

Outyougo
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:15 PM
Hay bales come in varied sized from tiny (heavy) compressed bales to huge 1600 lb bales!

I can easily fir 24 3-tie (150#) in my F250 doesn't mean it is not a we bit scary to drive in the hills! Those deaths bales are hard to handle.

Can fit over 50 of the lighter 2-tie that I prefer to tie down. the 2-tie are way easier to handle (even though some times they can weigh up to 100#)

deltawave
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:17 PM
Depends on what you mean by "bale", of course, but I can do 15 average-sized (40-60 pound) bales in my short bed, no problem.

EponaRoan
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:21 PM
I have no idea, but this would be a most awesome word problem for math class! :lol:

yellow-horse
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:39 PM
I can get 50 in my truck of average size bales, its death defying but they are strapped down well, I let the hay guy do the strapping, he's kinda ocd about loadng hay

RHdobes563
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:48 PM
Shucks. I thought there was going to be a punch line.

slpeders
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:51 PM
There may still be...Subk hasn't posted her final count! :)
I was going to ask what others asked -- what size bales?

shakeytails
Oct. 22, 2008, 01:51 PM
50 or so, tied down. 20 or so, not tied.

amdfarm
Oct. 22, 2008, 02:33 PM
In my 8' bed, small person (me - 5'2" - 115lbs) stacking, and bales that average 65lbs, I get 21 per load and not tied down w/ the tailgate up. 6 miles round trip, but sometimes it's 60 miles round trip. I only stack three high (down the center) and that's as high as I can go and I can't stand dealing w/ straps. Now if I take the flatbed, that's different. :)

aspenlucas
Oct. 22, 2008, 02:39 PM
You must all not haul hay! In a pickup truck with straps and stacked well 70-80 bales. Without straps going up to 25 miles, I can do 45 bales EASILY. If you want to be safe take some twine and tie a few. Wow. I'd hate to worry about 15 bales and straps, you can fit 13 in the BED of the pickup!

veezee
Oct. 22, 2008, 02:47 PM
Depends on the size of the hay bales. 15 should be just fine in a long bed truck. If you don't have enough room and have to stack them on top of each other make sure you have rope to secure the bales and drive carefully. You can stack alot more but need to make sure they are secure. Have fun!:)

pinkme
Oct. 22, 2008, 02:52 PM
I do 32 in a 1500 reg bed, untied and can go the speed limit :) 15 will be FINE!

MistyBlue
Oct. 22, 2008, 02:57 PM
Like Aspenlucas stated...8' bed, tailgate down, 13 bales in the bottom and 21-23 with a second layer, no ties. I only use ties when I start a third layer. And probably don't need them then either but it makes me feel better about not dodging traffic to pick up bales in case I was wrong about not needing ties. :winkgrin:

VAHorseGurl
Oct. 22, 2008, 03:10 PM
I got 6 bales in the back of my Element. If I had taken out my seats, I could have gotten all 10 bales in there. :lol:

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e165/KBMastiffs/Waall-E/Wall-EpackedwithHayII.jpg

~Kerri

MistyBlue
Oct. 22, 2008, 03:17 PM
I used to get 10 in the back of my Jeep Cherokee...but wiith the back seats folded down. However...it probably took 10 hours of using the shop-vac to get all that freaking chaff out of the back upholstery too. :o Now if it's pouring out and I need to pick up a few bales, I bring a box of lawn and leaf bags and slip each bale into a plastic bag before stuffing it in that old Jeep of mine. :lol:

Sing Mia Song
Oct. 22, 2008, 03:54 PM
I used to get six in a Honda del Sol. A bright, screaming green Honda del Sol. :lol: Two in the trunk and four lashed to the spoiler. 'Course, I was only going across the street (maybe a mile), but I did consider sending photos to Honda. I also lashed a field dressed deer to the spoiler once for a friend who got a little greedy out hunting one day. Wish I'd had a camera for that one--to see the looks on the faces of the other drivers! :cool:

Pennyhill
Oct. 22, 2008, 04:02 PM
I had a client show up one day with 15 bags of bedding in her Geo Metro! And she had her sister with her - poor kid had her head sticking out of the sunroof for about 15 miles! I have no idea why they didn't bring their full-sized van???

greysandbays
Oct. 22, 2008, 06:52 PM
41 in a regular box without tying down, 53 if with a front rack made of 2x4's in the front stake pockets and load tied down good -- but only if the bales are good and solid and whoever is loading them knows how to stack.

shakeytails
Oct. 22, 2008, 07:29 PM
You must all not haul hay! In a pickup truck with straps and stacked well 70-80 bales. Without straps going up to 25 miles, I can do 45 bales EASILY.

I bow to thee!!! You're definitely good and/or you have really tight uniform bales. I've never been able to get more than 60, and that's pushing the limit!

BEARCAT
Oct. 22, 2008, 10:56 PM
Last time, I got 56 in the back of my F250 long bed - and that was syacking them all by myself. Could have gotten more, but by the end, gravity becomes, shall we say, a lot more persistent...
It's a 60 mile drive 1 way for me, so the more I can fit the better...

LAZ
Oct. 22, 2008, 11:00 PM
53 or 54 80 lb bales, strapped across the top in an 8' bed.

Thank god I no longer move it by the pickup load....

amdfarm
Oct. 23, 2008, 02:39 AM
I must need a lesson in how to stack more than 21 in my truck w/out having to strap down!! I can't leave my tailgate down or it, at any moment, could just bounce right off, it's happened before, but not hauling anything, it was just down and off it came (on dirt thankfully.) I only have one working cable and it needs adjusted. SO will get to that eventually. I'm doing rounds now so I don't need it for squares.

I've done the haul hay in the car thing, too. I can put three bales in my trunk and two in the back seat, if absolutely necessary (trunk frozen shut a few times and had no choice there.) Oh the looks I get when doing that.

Proud To Be Spotted
Oct. 23, 2008, 07:42 AM
If you put them on their end, you can fit 16 bales in an 8 foot bed. no tie downs needed. Put them in a row of four for four rows. (for approx. 50-60# bales.)

Good Old Sledge
Oct. 23, 2008, 08:32 AM
50 is routine with gas like it is. If you don't change speed or direction very fast, you don't have to tie down. Just stack good and tight. With a 3/4 ton truck, you start to notice some handling differences at 35-40 bales.
If you're feeding really good hay - that "dairy cow" hay that smells like brown sugar - you're not going to want to go more than 40.
If it's loosely baled and doesn't weigh more than 35 or 40 lbs, then yes you can go to 60 or better, but it catche so much air and requires so many tie-downs to keep it from blowing off it's almost better to make two trips.

WaningMoon
Oct. 23, 2008, 08:59 AM
We always got 63 on our pickup. That's with a binder row on top and of course roped on.

aspenlucas
Oct. 23, 2008, 09:23 AM
I bow to thee!!! You're definitely good and/or you have really tight uniform bales. I've never been able to get more than 60, and that's pushing the limit!

My hay guy taught me well! :) But, I can't always get 70, sometimes. :) He can and is amazing! I know we put 13 on the bottom and then there are 15 on the 2nd, 3rd and sometimes 4th row. with 1 bale put upright. So 6 down each side, three down the middle and then one between the 2nd and 3rd down the middle going upright for the 2nd/3rd row. I've learned if I don't remember that bale I get about 10 bales less on the load, the back is not even! Now he'll put 70 on my truck and send me down the bumpy road EASILY without straps and I just have to drive slow til I get to the main road. And yes the bales have to be tight. Uniform is ok, if you have a smaller bale you can figure where to stick him, but you can't do it without tight bales! My options are pickup truck loads on get wagons from him, but wagons are harder to unload in my barn and only hold 140ish so that is 2 pick ups! When I go pick up and say only 50 bales today the truck looks empty, and it's not an extra long bed, normal bed on a Dodge 2500.

county
Oct. 23, 2008, 09:39 AM
I always haul 52 in mine tied down I can load more but its just to hard for my old body any more.

Bluey
Oct. 23, 2008, 11:24 AM
My 8' bed 1990 Ford holds easily 28 to 30 70 lb bales of alfalfa, tailgate down and no need to tie them down, they are tied by how we stack them and they don't budge at all.

A few years ago we raised 2032 small bales and 66 big bales of hay and loaded, hauled and put up all of the small bales in our Quonset barn, 28 at the time in that pickup.
You can easily load 20 bales just in the back half of an 8' bed plus tailgate, so it is east to feed out of it, as we do regularly to feed cattle.

You have two lengthways in the middle, between wheel wells.
Two on top of each one of those, perpendicular to them, sticking out a little over the sides and another row like that above those, with two more on top, those in the same direction than those on the bottom.
That is 12 bales.
Then on the back end of the pickup and tailgate, three more and three above that and two on top, for 8 more.

Since both little stacks are not tied to each other, you don't want to take off very fast and leave some behind, but for regular driving and feeding out of the pickup, that is a very handy way to stack.

Sansena
Oct. 23, 2008, 11:29 AM
Stacked 3 rows high, smaller at the top and tied down ;)

libgrrl
Oct. 23, 2008, 11:42 AM
Strapped down and loaded for maximum efficiency -- I've helped my friend load 70 bales in the bed of her truck. Granted, her F250 looked a lot like this:

http://www.io.com/~o_m/omworld/images/blog/12-05/specials/grinch.jpg

Everythingbutwings
Oct. 23, 2008, 12:12 PM
Without the truck, I've been known to get 6 #50 bags of grain in the rear of my Volvo wagon, 4 bagged shavings in the back seat and 5 bales of hay on the roof. I could fit more but the car can't carry it. :)

Mr. Wings had to point out that just because it fit didn't mean the suspension could take the load. :eek:

shakeytails
Oct. 23, 2008, 12:22 PM
Mr. Wings had to point out that just because it fit didn't mean the suspension could take the load. :eek:

LOL! Years ago we were trying to get hay out of the field before it rained, and we were using my Isuzu Pup. We had about 40 bales on that thing- on the roof, hood, anywhere we could stick a bale. I had to stick my head out the window to see where I was going. I so wish I had a picture!

flypony74
Oct. 23, 2008, 12:23 PM
I used to get six in a Honda del Sol. A bright, screaming green Honda del Sol. :lol: Two in the trunk and four lashed to the spoiler. 'Course, I was only going across the street (maybe a mile), but I did consider sending photos to Honda. I also lashed a field dressed deer to the spoiler once for a friend who got a little greedy out hunting one day. Wish I'd had a camera for that one--to see the looks on the faces of the other drivers! :cool:

Okay, you get the prize. I thought I was doing good when I could fit 3 bales in my Honda CRX back in college.

MintHillFarm
Oct. 23, 2008, 02:55 PM
My hay man brings me 75 on his pickup fitted with a longer bed and stacked high and tied down with multiple ropes.
You can easily do 2 levels in a regular pickup, likely 20 bales or more - I would bring ropes to tie down the bales from all sides.

gabz
Oct. 23, 2008, 03:28 PM
My F150, 6.75' (6.5) bed with gooseneck rails and hitch... I'm sure we had over 30 bales in there... close to36?

Stupid Fords with their high bed sides... 4 lengthwise behind the cab, cut edge down. then 1 on either side of the hitch ball and one in the middle - flat (plastic bag over the ball to prevent grease on hay), some space and 4 more lengthwise on cut edge on the tailgate. (11), next row, on edge again, 90 degrees to bottom layer, paired up all the way to the back. (10-12). Then 3 across the width of the truck,lengthwise - 2 rows, (6) and then 5 on the top crosswise. Roped and tied.

So.. must have been 11+12+6+5=34 and of course, 34 x 55 pounds + was over weight - since my payload is only 1600 pounds. oh well. (and people worry about hauling a GN - sheesh. The GN puts less weight on the truck than hay!!)

cpearson
Mar. 26, 2011, 12:15 PM
That's right, we poor horse farmers sometimes have to make do.

My 99 Grand Caravan SE does 32-34 bales, and we never lost a bale!

17-18 inside (without the back seats)

15-16 on the top (with clothes line)

Makes a big show when driving through town, but we don't have enough for that pick-up truck yet!

coloredcowhorse
Mar. 26, 2011, 12:49 PM
Hay bales out here are three strands of twine, weigh average of 120-125 lbs each, tight alfalfa. Years ago (lots of them) I had one horse in a self-care board situation. If I had more than one bale of hay there at a time it would disappear so I hauled one at a time...usually lasted about 5-6 days. Hauled, down a freeway, with a VW Beetle....trunk in the front. Looked like the car was eating the hay...bale didn't fit completely in there so put it in as far as possible, tied trunk lid down tight and sat really tall to see where I was going. Currently can get 3 into the back of '89 Jeep Cherokee and two on top....go through 4 a day with this herd so make several trips on one day and get 3-4 days worth at a time unless I can get a whole "cube" delivered (84 bales to a cube) or I go to the "big" bales (1250 lbs, 3x4x8 feet) or the "really big" bales (ton, 4x4x8 feet and packed really really tight)...those I get delivered or can get two of them on the 16 foot flatbed.

bludejavu
Mar. 26, 2011, 01:24 PM
Just now reading this thread and some of your stories are hysterical! I think someone should do a photo contest based on how creatively hay is stacked in any given vehicle!

As for my short bed Chevrolet, I get 20 60# bales comfortably in it without having to tie them and can still close the bed of the truck. Anymore than that, I have to secure the load because the top ones can come off.

ETA - just noticed how old this thread is - oh well...:)

spirithorse22
Mar. 26, 2011, 01:55 PM
I have no idea, but this would be a most awesome word problem for math class! :lol:

The one math word problem I might possibly understand and ace. :lol:

goeslikestink
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:06 PM
Will the truck get 15 bales or do I need to take my trailer too? (It's less than a 5 mile trip...)

20 as my straw man comes in apick up every week with 20 thats a little vm
and my hay man gets either 2 round bales as big ones is mitsubushi, or 30 bales of hay

Foxtrot's
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:26 PM
I lost a bale once - on the freeway. Still get the trembles at this possibilities of killing someone. Since then I do the tying down and check everything once I'm well on my way.

seabreeze
Mar. 26, 2011, 03:32 PM
52 on a full size truck with 8' bed, 35 on a mini. But you have to know how to stack.

That's exactly what I can fit on there as well.

bludejavu
Mar. 26, 2011, 04:34 PM
I lost a bale once - on the freeway. Still get the trembles at this possibilities of killing someone. Since then I do the tying down and check everything once I'm well on my way.

I will not get over 55 miles an hour hauling my 20 bales of hay in my shortbed for this very reason. I have dropped a few bales in the past from trying to stack higher than I should and not securing properly, but I always stopped to get them. It's not worth the risk to someone else's life and I don't want it on my conscience so I am much more careful than I used to be.

BEARCAT
Mar. 26, 2011, 07:46 PM
Got 54 on today. F250 long bed with tailgate down.
I ALWAYS tie.

ACP
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:34 AM
In an F-350 with normal 80 to 100 pound bales with two hay strings, you put the tailgate down and you can get 52 to 53 bales on the truck, but you need to strap it down or use a good rope/clothesline to tie down.

ROW 1 = 11
11 in the bed - 4 against cab, 3 by wheel wells, 4 at the back partly on the tailgate
these bales are stacked long ways, by the way
ROW 2 = 12
12 on top of those, stacked at right angles, with a bit extending over the side of the bed
ROW 3 = 12
12 on top of those, stacked the same direction as row 1
ROW 4 = 12
back to stacking at right angles to the bed
ROW 5 = 6
down the middle, so the weight of each bale is centered

11 + 12 + 12 + 12 + 6 = 53

If you don't have the straps with the built in ratchet mechanism, you can use a 100' piece of discount store 1/4" line. Fold it in half and make a loop at the fold, put that around the bumper hitch. Go up over the top bales of hay and over the cab of the truck, down toward the front bumper. Tie a small loop in each rope about halfway down from the front top of the cab, put each end of the rope under the front bumper and then come back up and go thru the loop. This gives you leverage to tighten things down without having to kill yourself.

Even a very small truck should carry the number of bales you want.

mht
Mar. 27, 2011, 09:56 AM
We took 20 bales into the track one day in the back of my Explorer Sport Trac!

Zu Zu
Mar. 27, 2011, 12:28 PM
My hay man stacks 54 bales in back of pick-up ... but he is third generation HAY MAN....:D

chism
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:02 PM
I used to get six in a Honda del Sol. A bright, screaming green Honda del Sol. :lol: Two in the trunk and four lashed to the spoiler. 'Course, I was only going across the street (maybe a mile), but I did consider sending photos to Honda. I also lashed a field dressed deer to the spoiler once for a friend who got a little greedy out hunting one day. Wish I'd had a camera for that one--to see the looks on the faces of the other drivers! :cool:


LOL! I got seven inside my subaru once. What a mess to clean up though!

20 in my truck is nothing, they're all in the bed. I've put a ton of hay (about 45 bales) in the back of my chevy 3500 dually. I can't see out of the rear window, but I've never lost a bale & I don't tie. Granted, I only have to go about 10 miles.

goeslikestink
Mar. 27, 2011, 01:33 PM
really depends on the size of the pick up tranist size can hold 50 or more

1st layer you fill the pcik up with 4 or 5 across dependinf on size
2nd layer you put one down the middle lenght ways this alllows you to put the side bales on half out half in the trialer or pick up then add the bales onto the sides
lenght ways and cross ways then top layer is shorter to hold it all in place

deckchick
Mar. 27, 2011, 04:30 PM
My hay man stacks 54 bales in back of pick-up ... but he is third generation HAY MAN....:D

I do that every hay season, and in the fall when I go to my nieghbours to swap him for straw.

I love my Whitey Ford. She's old and rusty, but she's a full size F250, the perfect farm truck.

And I only drive her a few miles from home when she's loaded like that....

bayou_bengal
Mar. 27, 2011, 10:55 PM
50 or sow tied- 30 untied - but as others have said, it depends on how you stack- hay stacking in pick-up beds is an ART!