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RoseBud143
Sep. 21, 2008, 10:36 PM
Ya, so I am totally NOT happy about it :( found out my horse has ringworm ( got it from using same tack) and I feel horrible. I put some betadine on it to start killing the fungi's, but I left it on to long and he had an allergic reaction to it and swelled up everywhere I put it. The girth area, and his arm pits, it was so swollen he didn't want to walk, Made me feel pretty bad. BUT I read a lot of different things to do. and that pretty much I can treat it so that doesn't spread, but it really just has to run its course.

I put the betadine on it, and the rinsed that off and gave him a bath with a Chlorehexidine shampoo and then put vinegar on it, let him dry and put a sulfur based ointment on it, Nu-Stock. all things that I had read that helped. I'm not looking forward to having to buy new grooming equip. and stuff like that. But I'm not really familiar with this since I have never had to treat it. Any suggestion of things I should look out for? and other ways to treat it and with what?? I know theres a lot of ways to do it and was just curious as to what others tried and what worked for them :)

Thank you

12hooves
Sep. 21, 2008, 10:44 PM
Desitin, or the generic version--make sure it's the white cream with zinc oxide in it. I have used it on some kittens that had ringworm and it works on horses that get scratches or other boo-boos.

RoseBud143
Sep. 21, 2008, 10:49 PM
Is it true that you really cant cure it up faster even with treatment? I keep reading that it just needs to run it course. And that young horses are more likely to get it, and then uild up their immunity towards it and not develop it agian. (mines 2.5) But i looked up some threads and i see people saying they have cleared it up with the treatment of this or that.

Simkie
Sep. 21, 2008, 11:14 PM
Um, no. It does not need to "just run it's course." If you don't treat it, you very well could never get rid of it and you'll probably spread it to other animals or get it yourself.

Fastest way to get rid of it is to use an appropriate anti-fungal. Get one from your vet or use something like this: http://www.kennelvet.com/topical-fungicide-for-horses-p-1665.html?zenid=0e240a2d37ac6449c7b3fb576ea694eb

Ringworm is not complicated, and I don't think it's that big of a deal. Just treat it and it will go away.

RoseBud143
Sep. 21, 2008, 11:25 PM
Thats what i would think to, They lady whos horse Mine got it from had the vet out and did the skin scraping ect, and thats justn what he told her, to treat it but that no matter what t will have to run its course of how ever long.

been looking it up and I just need to make sure i treat everything around the barn so t doesnt spread, Im just bummed b/c i have worked so had to have this beautiful golden coat on him, and the he gets something like this, and they way they lady made it sound with how fast it spread and how much hair he lost! I would truly freak out then. Anal i know.... :lol: but im hoping i caught it in time and will keep the spread to a min. I know his immune system is Not compramised in anyway, hes just young so he should ..I hope get over it quickly..

I used the Nu stock today but I read on a here that the diluted bleach works well, the foot cream, and toothpast, oh and would kote,

any of those anyone recommends over the next? if i could get a spray it would be great b/c i could ask my BM to spray him in the AM, and she wouldnt have to touh him. ( yes i know the wound kote it a spray) anything eles??

Simkie
Sep. 21, 2008, 11:29 PM
Use an anti-fungal. Ringworm is a fungus. Don't screw around with stuff that won't kill a fungus.

If you can't get an antifungal from the vet or your vet supply store, use athlete's foot spray. Athlete's foot is also a fungus.

Ringworm is really not difficult. Treat with an appropriate anti-fungal and it should be gone in a week and you'll see hair regrowth shortly after.

atr
Sep. 21, 2008, 11:51 PM
For goodness' sake, don't do all those things or you'll end up with a bald horse. Just get a fungicide from your vet and get it gone.

Do they not just prescribe Fulvicin anymore?

Your brushes, blankets, boots, saddle pads, even tack, you can rinse in a bleach solution--that'll take care of that. You could also wash down her stall with a bleach solution, too.

It's not a big deal, but you do want to get rid of it and try not to catch it yourself.

slainte!
Sep. 21, 2008, 11:52 PM
A run on a course of griseofulvin helps the process as well. Everything needs to be bleached that has touched the horse and kept seperate. No sharing anything! Call your vet and ask what he/she suggests. Will probably prescribe you medication without having to see the horse...

goeslikestink
Sep. 22, 2008, 03:44 AM
you need to have an iodine wash or iodine from a chemist human kind and or tack shop vets horse kind and a visit from the vet for an oral wormer for ringworm

you need to understand this his highly contagious to humans and animals

your yard should be in quaratine, with ext entry foot bath with jeyes disinfectant
and all your equipement rugs numnahs need disinfecting
and you need to wash clean all tack


and you need to wear rubber gloves
it cna transmit to you and other horses whilse this is on the ayrd the yard should be closed
and no movement in or out with horses going to shows etc

until the ringworm has gone

pics for you http://www.horsegroomingsupplies.com/pictures/gphoto-g36149.html


infomation-- http://www.liphookequinehosp.co.uk/llringworm.htm

Woodland
Sep. 22, 2008, 07:53 AM
My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out :( It will get the brand names for you later today.

PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!

HOH
Sep. 22, 2008, 08:44 AM
12hooves: Desitin, or the generic version

I second the vote for Desitin, but I've had luck with both the cream and the spray.

Frank B
Sep. 22, 2008, 09:09 AM
A two-week regimen of Fulvicin powder cleared up my mare completely.

A bit pricey, but it's easy to administer, and it works.

Remember to use separate grooming tools, and disinfect them religiously.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Sep. 22, 2008, 09:30 AM
If you just let it run its course, it will take about six weeks and you run the risk of secondary infections from the horse scratching itself - which will of course also spread the infection to the fenceposts or whatever the horse uses as a scratching post.

Fungicide.:yes: As said above, your vet can give you something or if you can't get a vet out use athlete's foot/jock itch stuff. But the stuff the vet prescribes will ultimately be cheaper. The little paint horse used to get ringworm every January when he was younger, so I know from experience.

If your horse people are like some around where I live, they will tell you to do all kinds of home remedies for things: bleach, Lysol, listerine, etc. (Interestingly, you will hear this list for just about any ailment from scratches to sweet itch.) Smile politely, nod, and ignore them completely. Otherwise you will wind up either a)not getting rid of the ringworm or b) causing chemical burns which stand a good chance of getting infected or c) both.

Dilute bleach solution (1/10) is good for disinfecting grooming tools but not for treating the horse itself. Listerine is just alcohol. Lysol is for floors. Sorry. I've repeated this litany to my neighbors so often it just comes out automatically anymore.:o

horsepoor
Sep. 22, 2008, 12:23 PM
My young horse got ringworm on his face this spring, just before his very first in-hand show -- we didn't go, since I didn't want to spread it around, nor did he look too special with his splotchy face. I think picking one thing and sticking to it is the key. My vet recommended Lotramin antifungal and that really did the trick. It took maybe a week to start to see the raised parts of the ringworm disappearing, and at two weeks it was all pretty normal skin with hair starting to grow again. Because it was on his face, I wasn't tempted by all the harsh treatments I too read about. I also disinfected EVERYTHING -- his tack, his stall, brushes, fly mask, bucket/feeder, etc. We got a pump sprayer like for weed killer and loaded it up with bleach solution to spray down the overhang posts, fence, barn walls -- anything that he rubbed on.

RoseBud143
Sep. 22, 2008, 06:51 PM
My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out :( It will get the brand names for you later today.

PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!

Yup thats what i did. I felt so bad, his whole girth area was completely swollen. he looked miserable. Called my vet today and really didnt give me much info, Just what i had already read, and to get a fungicide, well duh :) lol i was hopng on one that is known to be good and work the best :) lol
I got one called toad juice, we started carrying it a little while ago, and is supposed to work wonders, and with the betadine burning him, and this being all natural, i hope it will be soothing.

Simkie
Sep. 22, 2008, 06:58 PM
Toad Juice? All natural blend of essential oils? :rolleyes:

Go buy an anti-fungal. One that has been proven to be effective on fungus. Something that has Benzalkonium Chloride in it. Like this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=0&pf_id=0026112 or this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=0&mscssid=RLMMRNQPWD9K9KP8U6MKRMB7KUD60T0E&pf_id=0031260

Seriously. You have every single person in this thread telling you the same thing, and you're totally ignoring the advice that's been given. Ringworm is not difficult to treat, but you actually have to treat it with an ANTI-FUNGAL.

goeslikestink
Sep. 22, 2008, 07:27 PM
My horse contracted it - it was a flipping nightmare! Finally the vet had me get a ring worm topical made for cattle - I applied it every three days and it cured it. He did sluff off his skin under his coat but his coat stayed in tact. The coat damage will take until spring to repair. I apply Eqquis coat spray to it daily - which helps it look better. It took until someone got ringworm from my horse for my vet to figure it out :( It will get the brand names for you later today.

PS I curried 7% iodine into him and burned the crappola out of his skin - CAUTION! And iodine baths did not touch it. I battled it FOUR MONTHS! Used the cattle stuff and viola` GONE!

wrong type of iodine- if you useone from a chesmist which is human kind it doesnt do that
and coms in a small bottle if you use a tack shop one or vet one, comes diluted
as a wash -- there are two types of iodine
make sure you thee correct one

RoseBud143
Sep. 22, 2008, 08:32 PM
Toad Juice? All natural blend of essential oils? :rolleyes:

Go buy an anti-fungal. One that has been proven to be effective on fungus. Something that has Benzalkonium Chloride in it. Like this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=0&pf_id=0026112 or this stuff: http://www.jefferspet.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=0&mscssid=RLMMRNQPWD9K9KP8U6MKRMB7KUD60T0E&pf_id=0031260

Seriously. You have every single person in this thread telling you the same thing, and you're totally ignoring the advice that's been given. Ringworm is not difficult to treat, but you actually have to treat it with an ANTI-FUNGAL.

you can be sooo helpful, but yet so judgemental. I already called my vet and am using this b/c my horse had sucha bad reaction to something stronger, i wanted something to also soothe, AND yes this is an anti fungal, And yes i Know it has had to good results, thats why im trying it.

http://www.toadjuice.net/

there is the link of what i using, its also safe to use on tack, so thats also why i bought it, realy dont want to put a bleach solution on my saddle pads ect, I trust our reps, and all the feed back from customers, so thats why im using this ANTI FUNGAL.



"Welcome to Coco's Equine Line, creators of Toad Juice(R), Toad Jelly(TM) and Toad Stick(TM). Coco's Equine Line started business in Sept 2005, just 2 short years ago and man, as my freind Robyne keeps saying "Who da thought?" I created Toad Juice after I had tried every other product on the market, on my horses Jade and Gayus. Each spring Jade "breaks out" on her face, belly and chest. I say breaks out because I don't think she has just one type of skin problem. Gayus has itchy, flaky, gooey skin ALL YEAR ROUND. Like I said, I had tried everything; natural, unnatural. Nothing worked and some of these products made MY HANDS BREAK OUT. Using my degree in Biology, I researched and experimented with 100's of different essential oils and different blends of oils, using only the safest and mildestbut MOST EFFECTIVE. I then experimented with different bases, finally deciding on a solution base I could use that would not leave an oily residue or interfere with other topical products. I have conducted experiments with Toad Juice on numerous strains of bacteria and fungus to check and verify Toad Juice efficacy. I created Toad Juice(R). I am truly amazed at how effective my products are for so many different applications on so many types of animals and skin problems! From Rain Rot to cuts and scrapes, yeast infections and mosquito bites, Toad Juice relieves the itching and scratching. Thank you for visiting our website.

Please feel free to email or call (407) 718-1278 24/7 with any questions or comments. Like ALL good companies, we stand behind and guarantee our products. Toad Juice is a blend of essential oils and herbs. It is ALL NATURAL and NON-TOXIC, so it is kid safe. Toad Juice works on horses, dogs and cats. I have had customers use it on chickens, goats, cows, ducks AND even an iguana!!! Toad Juice works on: Rain Rot, Ringworm, Summer Itch, Sweet Itch, Grease, Mange, and Dermatitus caused by Flies, Fleas AND Mosquitoes. Toad Juice may be used on the face, avoiding the eyes and mucous membranes and entire body! Toad Juice will not interfere with other topical products, like fly spray, AND can be used as an antiseptic for minor cuts and scrapes. The essential oils in Toad Juice will help reduce skin inflammation, cool hot skin, relieve itching and scratching AND it is safe if your pet HAS to lick it off!"
so yes i am listen to advice and appriciate it. I went out and gave him a bath with the chlorehexidine agian, and the let it dry and put on the "toad juice" b/c i wanted to soothe that hot skin, and then sprayed down all my saddles, bridles, pads ect. along with his stall, hes in private turnone right now, so away from the other horses. My vet said i could give this a try," any anti fungal.." and when i asked about this she said to try it, if i dont see improvment then im going to get the athletes foot cream but really dont want to irritate his skin any more than it already is.

t. nason
Sep. 22, 2008, 08:52 PM
lysol it works

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Sep. 22, 2008, 09:04 PM
Please, satisfy my curiosity. Why are you doing this? Why do you think essential oils will be more efficacious at curing a fungus than something the vet will prescribe? Is it price? Is it inaccessibility of a vet? Is it some idiosyncratic gripe you have against proven traditional medicine? I am flummoxed.

Why do people believe in weird sh!t? Do you just think people go to vet school for years in order to scam people?

RoseBud143
Sep. 22, 2008, 09:54 PM
omg i called my vet, she said i could try this. i called my vet this AM. i posted last night. so yes im trying this, have been told it works well, and i wanted something to SOOTHE his burnt skin. so yes im listening to my vet who gave me the OK to try this, thus i am for the reason l listed.

Simkie
Sep. 22, 2008, 10:09 PM
Welp, I sincerely hope your horse is not one of the many that has a nasty reaction to essential oils :rolleyes:

I'd love to see where the makers of this "Toad Juice" has published her studies. I'd love to see her studies PERIOD. Isn't it interesting how she hasn't bothered to publish her results? You'd think she'd put them out there...if she'd actually DONE any. If it does all it says she does it's a damn miracle substance and every vet I know would be falling all over it. ANYONE can say ANYTHING. It doesn't make it true.

I've used real, actual fungicide on broken skin and it doesn't irritate it at all.

Have fun treating your ring worm for weeks and weeks and weeks. Why did you even ask if you weren't going to listen to the response?

RoseBud143
Sep. 23, 2008, 03:32 PM
Welp, I sincerely hope your horse is not one of the many that has a nasty reaction to essential oils :rolleyes:

I'd love to see where the makers of this "Toad Juice" has published her studies. I'd love to see her studies PERIOD. Isn't it interesting how she hasn't bothered to publish her results? You'd think she'd put them out there...if she'd actually DONE any. If it does all it says she does it's a damn miracle substance and every vet I know would be falling all over it. ANYONE can say ANYTHING. It doesn't make it true.

I've used real, actual fungicide on broken skin and it doesn't irritate it at all.

Have fun treating your ring worm for weeks and weeks and weeks. Why did you even ask if you weren't going to listen to the response?


Why? to rant and rave like so many about an aggravating case of a fungal dermatitis that I have to deal with, with my horse, and one that im not happy about having to deal with, when I originally posted I stated that I had washed with iodine, the chlorehexidine, vinegar, and then the nu stock, So was already treating it with the stuff that I looked up and researched on the Internet, and called my VET.

I did not come here blindly seeking help being completely clueless. I came here posting what I did and then asking what others have done that have been effective for them. There are a lot of different answers and opinions on what is best to be used, and that normal b/c each product is going to act and a lil different with each horses individual strand/problem. But I keep getting the vibe from you that you want to be as helpful as you can be; and in other posts you have been, But right when someone doesn't take your exact advice you become completely defensive and then very critical. Everyone has an opinion, and everyone has used products in the past that have or haven't worked. but not everyone is always right every single time ... and that goes for everyone including you. If there was only one way to do something, and do it right there wouldn't be an open discussion about and then so many ways to treat it. So given the information from my VET, this forum and OTHER outside sources I chose what I did for the reasons I did, and will have a back up if I don't like the results.

There is nothing wrong with trying new things, that's how advancements are made..... in any area.

RoseBud143
Sep. 23, 2008, 03:40 PM
:lol:
My young horse got ringworm on his face this spring, just before his very first in-hand show -- we didn't go, since I didn't want to spread it around, nor did he look too special with his splotchy face. I think picking one thing and sticking to it is the key. My vet recommended Lotramin antifungal and that really did the trick. It took maybe a week to start to see the raised parts of the ringworm disappearing, and at two weeks it was all pretty normal skin with hair starting to grow again. Because it was on his face, I wasn't tempted by all the harsh treatments I too read about. I also disinfected EVERYTHING -- his tack, his stall, brushes, fly mask, bucket/feeder, etc. We got a pump sprayer like for weed killer and loaded it up with bleach solution to spray down the overhang posts, fence, barn walls -- anything that he rubbed on.

Thats what i had to do last night. went and sprayed everything down, my tack with the spray i got, then the bleach for my grooming stuff. Its a nightmare, and i feel bad for my man. glad im not the only one thats had to go through this crap! lol...

I was cleaning him yesterday and there is a girl there that just loves him, and was asking about what i was doing and why. I told her he had ringworm, and why i was cleaning it, ect. Her mom came up and told he she had to go, and then she started screaming "Spirit has ring worms!, mom he has rings worms!" lol just the way she was yelling it i had to laught but she was so energetic and so happy to kinda learn something i didnt have the heart to go and correct her that it was a fungis not a worm, But when an "S" is added on the the worms it makes it sound pretty horrific :lol:

so off to more cleaning and treating to night!

bird4416
Sep. 23, 2008, 04:12 PM
From the ToadJuice website:




Toad Juice® is a safe, non-toxic, chemical-free solution that may be sprayed on your horse without the need to rinse off. It's special ingredients work gently, killing bacteria and fungus without interfering with fly spray! In fact, Toad Juice® actually enhances the use of fly spray by creating a germ-free environment flies aren't attracted to! Toad Juice® has also been used on dogs and cats relieving mange, ringworm and skin irritations from fleas and ticks. (bolding mine)


There is nothing on the earth that is chemical free. Water is a chemical. It is H2O. I guarantee that "juice" has water in it along with a lot of other chemicals. I hate the term "chemical" used like it is a bad thing.

Rant over, carry on with the suggestions that the OP won't follow.

vxf111
Sep. 23, 2008, 04:42 PM
Is this the same horse that had some gaping wound and the vet suggested slapping a little sugardine on the wound and letting the horse back out to graze in the swamp? How is that wound, by the way? Now the vet suggested eschewing fungicide in favor of some essential oil Toad Juice? Who is this vet? Where did they go to vet school? If this is truly the advice you're getting from the vet, I think you need to shop around for a new vet. Ringworm is not giant mystery. It's a fungus. To kill it, you have to use an antifungal drug. As simple as that. BTW- be careful or you too will soon have ringworm. It's fairly easy to spread.

Simkie
Sep. 23, 2008, 04:44 PM
Is this the same horse that had some gaping wound and the vet suggested slapping a little sugardine on the wound and letting the horse back out to graze in the swamp? How is that wound, by the way? Now the vet suggested eschewing fungicide in favor of some essential oil Toad Juice? Who is this vet? Where did they go to vet school? If this is truly the advice you're getting from the vet, I think you need to shop around for a new vet. Ringworm is not giant mystery. It's a fungus. To kill it, you have to use an antifungal drug. As simple as that.

Oh. Is this THAT person?! :eek:

I had not made the connection. That explains an awful lot.

Kaeleer
Sep. 23, 2008, 05:20 PM
Is there even the slightest chance that Toad Juice (TM) can cure terminal stupidity?

chaltagor
Sep. 23, 2008, 05:38 PM
omg i called my vet, she said i could try this. i called my vet this AM. i posted last night. so yes im trying this, have been told it works well, and i wanted something to SOOTHE his burnt skin. so yes im listening to my vet who gave me the OK to try this, thus i am for the reason l listed.

You could call your vet and ask her if you can try applying real toads to your horse, and she will say "Yes, you could try it." It won't get you anywhere, but you can try it!

JSwan
Sep. 23, 2008, 06:05 PM
Holy sh**.

:eek:


Is this the same horse that had some gaping wound and the vet suggested slapping a little sugardine on the wound and letting the horse back out to graze in the swamp? How is that wound, by the way? Now the vet suggested eschewing fungicide in favor of some essential oil Toad Juice? Who is this vet? Where did they go to vet school? If this is truly the advice you're getting from the vet, I think you need to shop around for a new vet. Ringworm is not giant mystery. It's a fungus. To kill it, you have to use an antifungal drug. As simple as that. BTW- be careful or you too will soon have ringworm. It's fairly easy to spread.

Sithly
Sep. 23, 2008, 07:09 PM
Ugh, you again. Why do you come here asking for advice only to argue with everyone who tries to help you?

FYI, I've seen essential oils burn the skin off a horse. They are worse than useless. You'd be better off spending your money on snake oil.

bird4416
Sep. 23, 2008, 08:04 PM
You'd be better off spending your money on snake oil.

She doesn't need snake oil, shes got Toad Juice. :)

snopbobil
Sep. 23, 2008, 09:37 PM
Please, satisfy my curiosity. Why are you doing this? Why do you think essential oils will be more efficacious at curing a fungus than something the vet will prescribe? Is it price? Is it inaccessibility of a vet? Is it some idiosyncratic gripe you have against proven traditional medicine? I am flummoxed.

Why do people believe in weird sh!t? Do you just think people go to vet school for years in order to scam people?


I for one do not believe in traditonal medicine, it's the weird sh!t to me and there's nothing proven about it, I quit believing in scientific research long ago, any research can be altered and it usually is by the drug companies, we've had ring worm in cats and dogs before, back when we used TM (trad medicine) we used what ever the vet told us to, it would clear up for a short while and then return with a vengence, then we got involved with alternative's and we were told to let it run it's coarse & support the immune system, we did and it went away forever, so I guess I believe in what works and alternative is the only thing that has worked for me.

snopbobil
Sep. 23, 2008, 09:42 PM
She doesn't need snake oil, shes got Toad Juice. :)


I'd take toad juice or snake oil any day over drugs that have crippling and deadly side effects and that don't fix problems, only cover up symtoms.

bird4416
Sep. 23, 2008, 09:55 PM
Last time I checked, cobra venom, a totally naturally occuring "snake oil" had a few crippling and deadly side effects and didn't fix any problems. I'm not sure about the covering up of symptoms.

Sithly
Sep. 23, 2008, 10:01 PM
Last time I checked, cobra venom, a totally naturally occuring "snake oil" had a few crippling and deadly side effects and didn't fix any problems. I'm not sure about the covering up of symptoms.

Well, if the first symptom is death, then you could safely say you eliminated the ringworm problem.

:lol:

Now to bottle this ringworm cure and make millions!

vxf111
Sep. 24, 2008, 09:33 AM
I'd take toad juice or snake oil any day over drugs that have crippling and deadly side effects and that don't fix problems, only cover up symtoms.

Last time I checked, anti-fungal medicine (the likes of which is sold OTC for humans) does not have crippling/deadly side effects, is highly effective, and kills fungus rather than covering up symptoms. We're not talking some new highly developmental therapy here-- we're talking DESETIN.

Rye
Sep. 24, 2008, 09:56 AM
As others have said skip the bullsh$t toad juice and just pick up some jock itch or atheletes foot spray for the horse and some bleach solution for sanitizing the brushes and stall.

Do you think that men would spray their bits and pieces with it if it was caustic or irritating to the skin???? We're talking about men....wimpy creatures....

Life is as hard as you make and you're going overboard.

RoseBud143
Sep. 24, 2008, 08:46 PM
hahah wow, OK well, he looks great, the inflimation in his skin has gone down, and nothing has spread. I picked up some monistate and lotermine spray for him. That way they can spray him in the morning and I can put it on in the afternoon. And no one has to touch him except for me. This is my first time dealing with ringworm, so dont know what to look for as far as improvment, but i think it looks good, the circles are flat and no longer raised up, there has been no spreading whats so ever and hes back to his normal self. So with his skin being less irritated considering the the sitution, the toad juice i think worked for what i was looking for and and was able to disenfect most of my tack/saddle pads. And started the other stuff last night.

ok carry on :)

vxf111
Sep. 25, 2008, 11:25 AM
It's a miracle! Between the Toad Juice and the majik sugardine cure-- your vet only needs one more and she/he is eligible for Catholic sainthood. Hurrah!

Simkie
Sep. 25, 2008, 11:28 AM
It's a miracle! Between the Toad Juice and the majik sugardine cure-- your vet only needs one more and she/he is eligible for Catholic sainthood. Hurrah!

Snort. The one more is going to be monistat curing ringworm. Who thinks up this shit?

Sithly
Sep. 25, 2008, 11:43 AM
It's a miracle! Between the Toad Juice and the majik sugardine cure-- your vet only needs one more and she/he is eligible for Catholic sainthood. Hurrah!

For the win! :lol::lol::lol:

bird4416
Sep. 25, 2008, 12:51 PM
Monistat is an anti-fungal and should work for the ringworm infection.


http://www.medicinenet.com/miconazole/article.htm


GENERIC NAME: miconazole

BRAND NAME: Monistat; Femizol; Vagistat; M-Zole; Micatin; Lotrimin

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Miconazole is an anti-fungal medication related to fluconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=739) (Diflucan), ketoconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=770) (Nizoral), itraconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=836) (Sporanox), and clotrimazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=921) (Lotrimin, Mycelex). It is used either on the skin or in the vagina for fungal infections. Miconazole was approved by the FDA in 1974.

Simkie
Sep. 25, 2008, 01:04 PM
Monistat is an anti-fungal and should work for the ringworm infection.


http://www.medicinenet.com/miconazole/article.htm


GENERIC NAME: miconazole

BRAND NAME: Monistat; Femizol; Vagistat; M-Zole; Micatin; Lotrimin

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Miconazole is an anti-fungal medication related to fluconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=739) (Diflucan), ketoconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=770) (Nizoral), itraconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=836) (Sporanox), and clotrimazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=921) (Lotrimin, Mycelex). It is used either on the skin or in the vagina for fungal infections. Miconazole was approved by the FDA in 1974.

Huh. My bad. Learn something new every day.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Sep. 25, 2008, 01:42 PM
But those little tubes of Monistat and Lotrimin, etc. aren't cheap, especially when you have to buy enough of them to treat a horse. I came out cheaper going to my vet, who sold me a horse-sized bottle of some sort of spray - which was also much easier to apply.:yes:

Simkie
Sep. 25, 2008, 01:51 PM
But those little tubes of Monistat and Lotrimin, etc. aren't cheap, especially when you have to buy enough of them to treat a horse. I came out cheaper going to my vet, who sold me a horse-sized bottle of some sort of spray - which was also much easier to apply.:yes: Nod nod. I think my bottle of anti-fungal spray cost less than five bucks :yes:

bird4416
Sep. 25, 2008, 03:11 PM
Don't forget the shock value of taking a case of Lotrimin to the check out counter. :lol:

One is Enough
Sep. 25, 2008, 03:42 PM
Don't forget the shock value of taking a case of Lotrimin to the check out counter. :lol:


:lol: The stories you could tell to the clerk.

"Ever hear of Botox parties.."

RoseBud143
Sep. 25, 2008, 04:22 PM
Snort. The one more is going to be monistat curing ringworm. Who thinks up this shit?

Monistat is an anti-fungal and should work for the ringworm infection.


http://www.medicinenet.com/miconazole/article.htm


GENERIC NAME: miconazole

BRAND NAME: Monistat; Femizol; Vagistat; M-Zole; Micatin; Lotrimin

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Miconazole is an anti-fungal medication related to fluconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=739) (Diflucan), ketoconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=770) (Nizoral), itraconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=836) (Sporanox), and clotrimazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=921) (Lotrimin, Mycelex). It is used either on the skin or in the vagina for fungal infections. Miconazole was approved by the FDA in 1974.





Huh. My bad. Learn something new every day.





Snort! haha what..??!! you mean you DONT know EVERYTHING!!! geezz whoda thought!

Sithly
Sep. 25, 2008, 04:29 PM
Snort! haha what..??!! you mean you DONT know EVERYTHING!!! geezz whoda thought!

:rolleyes: Good lord. Yeah, Simke didn't know Monistat was an anti-fungal, but that doesn't make YOU any less of a moron.

RoseBud143
Sep. 25, 2008, 04:30 PM
But those little tubes of Monistat and Lotrimin, etc. aren't cheap, especially when you have to buy enough of them to treat a horse. I came out cheaper going to my vet, who sold me a horse-sized bottle of some sort of spray - which was also much easier to apply.:yes:

You know what i think is really funny?. this whole time is a type fest of " OMG r you dumb, just go to a store and by any anti fungal! really not that hard, life is as hard as you make it! yoda, yoda, geesh just buy an anti fungal stop wasteing your time..." I went and got an anti fungal and then i get chastised about BUYING and anti fungal! haha. Im sorry i just find that really funny,

and the monistate was by recommendation of the pharmicist. who did get a laugh out of it when i asked which spray was better, lotermin or tenactin. :lol:

RoseBud143
Sep. 25, 2008, 04:37 PM
:rolleyes: Good lord. Yeah, Simke didn't know Monistat was an anti-fungal, but that doesn't make YOU any less of a moron.

why b/c i didnt follow someones exact advice, because i called and spoke to my vet, because i followed the advice of people i actually know and trust their judgement, and know that they really even have exp. not someone behind a computer screen, b/c i laughed at someone who this whole time gets a kick out of trying to being right and then makes a fool of herself trying to make other people look stupid when she is in fact the person who doesnt know what shes trying talking about..

I think you should join the moron party!... welcome!;)

Simkie
Sep. 25, 2008, 04:45 PM
Huh. Yeah, silly me--the single time I've had ringworm in an equine, I used an EQUINE anti-fungal. Strange, I know, to use a product designed for a horse on a horse. :rolleyes:

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Sep. 25, 2008, 05:55 PM
You know what i think is really funny?. this whole time is a type fest of " OMG r you dumb, just go to a store and by any anti fungal! really not that hard, life is as hard as you make it! yoda, yoda, geesh just buy an anti fungal stop wasteing your time..." I went and got an anti fungal and then i get chastised about BUYING and anti fungal! haha. Im sorry i just find that really funny,

and the monistate was by recommendation of the pharmicist. who did get a laugh out of it when i asked which spray was better, lotermin or tenactin. :lol:

From your post, I thought maybe you didn't have the final say on whether or not to call out a vet to your horse. That's why I advised buying an anti-fungal if you couldn't get the vet out.

Instant Karma
Sep. 25, 2008, 05:57 PM
Snort. The one more is going to be monistat curing ringworm. Who thinks up this shit?

As much as Rosebud and her antics irritate the bejeezus out of me, I have to say, I have had ringworm on my hand for a while. I have tried everything my dermatologist has recommended and prescribed, including a month of Lamisil tablets. The ONLY thing that is finally getting rid of it (it's *almost* gone!) is Monistat 7, at least twice a day.

While I think Rosebud needs to start consulting her vet and suck up the fact that she has to pay once in a while for vet bills, I can attest to the fact that Monistat CAN treat *some* types of ringworm, and I understand there are a large variety of ringworm type fungii.

equinelaw
Sep. 25, 2008, 06:46 PM
I just wish she would stop asking us is she has no intention of ever listening.

Ownedby2
Sep. 25, 2008, 07:54 PM
I lurk, but I have to tell you....all the essential oils in hell won't help ring worm! It spread through our barn like, well, a fungus. The horses who were treated with a fungicide healed quickly. Those who were "treated" with essential oils and such...are still itching. And their owners refuse to use an anti-fungal!!! I used a concoction of three anti-fungals and a spray on my horse. It worked.

BTW, I got it from my horse. It spread all over my upper torso. HOLY MOLEY! One spot on my shoulder spread all over my back, neck, and arms. It too 4 oral medications, 3 tubes of creamm, and six weeks to conqer that bad boy! Nasty stuff. The horse? 14 days.

RoseBud143
Sep. 26, 2008, 10:47 AM
I lurk, but I have to tell you....all the essential oils in hell won't help ring worm! It spread through our barn like, well, a fungus. The horses who were treated with a fungicide healed quickly. Those who were "treated" with essential oils and such...are still itching. And their owners refuse to use an anti-fungal!!! I used a concoction of three anti-fungals and a spray on my horse. It worked.

BTW, I got it from my horse. It spread all over my upper torso. HOLY MOLEY! One spot on my shoulder spread all over my back, neck, and arms. It too 4 oral medications, 3 tubes of creamm, and six weeks to conqer that bad boy! Nasty stuff. The horse? 14 days.

i reall only got the TJ to use on him to cool his skin when it ot burnt nfrom the iodine. now hes getting the spray in the AM and the cream in the pm - plus a he still gets a bath with the chlorehexidine or betadine.. i alternate it.

So far i have not gotten but i have been pretty carefull. and has much as others would hate to hear it the TJ realy did work for what i was hopping for.. and his skin looks good. i was just worried about other side effects or symptoms since it can be an immunity thing.

Beethoven
Sep. 26, 2008, 11:29 AM
A horse at my barn got ringworm. Owner got it early and its gone in less than a week with hair growing back. Only one spot and never spread. She put lotramin(anti-fungal) on it.

RoseBud143
Sep. 26, 2008, 02:23 PM
A horse at my barn got ringworm. Owner got it early and its gone in less than a week with hair growing back. Only one spot and never spread. She put lotramin(anti-fungal) on it.

thats the spray i got for the him. do you know if she used the cream or spray when she treated it?

thanks

HOH
Sep. 26, 2008, 03:18 PM
I knew this thread would be both educational and entertaining!

I would venture to guess that this is a mis-spelling (based on previous posts):

Rosebud123: the TJ realy did work for what i was hopping for

hopping s/b hoping, but HOW FUNNY the conversation was about Toad Juice!

:lol:

carry on.... :)

Beethoven
Sep. 26, 2008, 03:39 PM
thats the spray i got for the him. do you know if she used the cream or spray when she treated it?

thanks

She used the cream.

RoseBud143
Sep. 26, 2008, 07:10 PM
ok i can see the cream being more effective, but i got the spray thinking it would be easier(for the BO), but the aresol is so light i cant see it being very penetrating.

RoseBud143
Sep. 26, 2008, 07:10 PM
I knew this thread would be both educational and entertaining!

I would venture to guess that this is a mis-spelling (based on previous posts):


hopping s/b hoping, but HOW FUNNY the conversation was about Toad Juice!

:lol:

carry on.... :)

ok i got a laugh out of that one :)

Huntertwo
Sep. 26, 2008, 07:23 PM
Monistat is an anti-fungal and should work for the ringworm infection.


http://www.medicinenet.com/miconazole/article.htm


GENERIC NAME: miconazole

BRAND NAME: Monistat; Femizol; Vagistat; M-Zole; Micatin; Lotrimin

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Miconazole is an anti-fungal medication related to fluconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=739) (Diflucan), ketoconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=770) (Nizoral), itraconazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=836) (Sporanox), and clotrimazole (http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=921) (Lotrimin, Mycelex). It is used either on the skin or in the vagina for fungal infections. Miconazole was approved by the FDA in 1974.

I also had to go to the Pharmacy an picked up Miconazole after my horse injured her eye, per Vets orders. She said it was one of the best meds to keep an eye from getting a fungus infection. Who knew?

Nojacketrequired
Sep. 26, 2008, 11:43 PM
when I originally posted I stated that I had washed with iodine, the chlorehexidine, vinegar, and then the nu stock, So was already treating it with the stuff that I looked up and researched on the Internet, and called my VET.
You used all of those products at once and then wondered why the horse's skin was burned?

Hmmmmm....can't imagine.

All you did was weaken the outer layers of the derma to allow the fubgus to spread more easily.

NJR

RoseBud143
Sep. 27, 2008, 01:07 PM
You used all of those products at once and then wondered why the horse's skin was burned?

Hmmmmm....can't imagine.

All you did was weaken the outer layers of the derma to allow the fubgus to spread more easily.

NJR

ummm... no did the bedadine before hand.. and then read on a web site do do the other, the chorehexidine is a more gentle shampoo (why i used that). the fungus doesnt like the acid levels of the vinegar, and the nu stock. is a sulfur based ointment that kills fungus. AND it never spread. ill find the article i read.

"How to Treat Ringworm
Think your horse has fungal dermatitis, commonly known as ringworm? Here's how to cure it in seven easy steps.

By Karen E.N. Hayes, DVM, MS

Your horse's haircoat looks scruffy along one side of his neck. On closer inspection, you see patches of hair loss. The exposed skin is crusty with large flakes of dandruff (dry scales). There's no evidence that the affected area is inflamed or itchy. That is, the skin isn't red or hot, and there are no scrapes or scabs that would suggest he's been rubbing. He doesn't seem to mind when you touch the exposed skin, and you've found no similar lesions elsewhere on his body. He appears healthy in all other respects

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO?

1. Call your veterinarian as soon as you can.

Why: Although this isn't an emergency requiring immediate veterinary care, you should inform your vet about your horse's condition. Although the lesions are probably caused by a local fungal infection (more about that in a minute), they might signify something more serious (such as a body-wide infection), requiring veterinary treatment. By calling your vet now-and providing updates throughout your home- treatment program-he or she will be able to determine whether veterinary treatment is called for.

Most likely, the lesions are caused by ringworm, a fungal dermatitis, or fungus-based skin infection. (Fungus refers to organisms whose goal is to destroy organic-or living-material.) The lesion appears to be superficial and limited to one area of your horse's body, so it should respond well to home treatment.

2. Clip hair away from the affected area.

Why: To remove the fungus' main food source: keratin, the protein that makes up your horse's hair and outer skin cells.

How: Using electric clippers and a #40 (surgical) blade, clip any remaining hair from each bald spot. Extend the shaved area so there's a 1/2-inch margin of unaffected skin around each lesion.

3. Spot-bathe the lesions.

Why: To help kill the fungus.

How:


Wet the shaved area with a sponge, and apply antifungal antiseptic, such as Betadine scrub, available at pharmacies, or Novalsan scrub, available by prescription from your vet. Lather up the scrub, and let it stand for 10 minutes to give it time to thoroughly kill the fungus.


Rinse thoroughly with water.


Follow with a final rinse, using 2 tablespoons white vinegar mixed in 1 quart of clean water. This solution helps cut any remaining soap and creates a slightly acidic environment unfriendly to fungi. Apply the vinegar solution to affected areas with a sponge or trigger-type spray bottle.


Blow-dry the wet areas-especially in cold weather-if you have access to electricity in your barn. Otherwise, towel-dry the areas the best you can, then let them air-dry.

4. Apply an antifungal dressing.

Why: To kill any remaining fungus on the skin, and to discourage new infections.

How: Apply a thin layer of antifungal ointment or spray, such as Betadine ointment or an over-the-counter human product for athlete's foot. Repeat daily for 7 days, then reduce to twice a week until the lesions appear to be shrinking and new hair growth is visible in their centers (about 1 to 2 weeks).

5. Keep lesions clean, dry, and exposed to air and sun.

Why: Fungus thrives in dark, damp conditions, such as the deep recesses of a wet, dirty winter coat. Dry conditions and ultraviolet light (sunlight) kill fungus.

How: If your horse gets wet and/or dirty, use clean grooming tools to remedy the situation, and provide clean, dry living quarters. On clear, sunny days, turn him out in a dry paddock where his skin can get a good dose of sunshine. Don't blanket him if you can avoid it. If you must (i.e., if it's bitterly cold), use a clean, dry garment that isn't shared with other horses. (For why, see below.)

6. Disinfect your premises and yourself.

Why: Ringworm is contagious to horses and other livestock, house pets, and humans.

How: Clean up all clipped hair and grooming debris in the treatment area, and discard them in a knotted plastic garbage bag. Thoroughly clean grooming equipment in Lysol disinfectant concentrate, rinse, and allow to dry. Bathe and shampoo yourself and any house pets that may've come into contact with these materials. Launder your clothes. Check yourself, family members, and other animals for lesions once weekly for the next 3 weeks.

7. Evaluate your horse's progress.

Why: To determine whether your home treatment is working. If you follow the above instructions and there's no improvement, your horse may have an underlying problem that will require veterinary evaluation and treatment, and/or the fungal infection may be deeper and more severe than home treatment can resolve.

Note that your horse is constantly exposed to fungus in his environment. It gained a stronghold in this case only because his skin or overall immune system was somehow weakened. If dirt, water, etc., weakened the natural defenses in your horse's skin, your home treatment should be sufficient. However, if his immune system has been compromised, an underlying disease may be the culprit.

How: Once a week, check for new lesions, and examine existing lesions to see whether they're shrinking and growing new hair in their centers. If there's evidence of spread, and/or if there's no improvement within 2 weeks, call your vet for an evaluation.

PROGNOSIS

Excellent. Most cases improve quickly with treatment and good hygiene.

Karen Hayes is an Idaho-based equine practitioner.

This article first appeared in the April 2001 issue of Horse & Rider magazine. "