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mayhew
Aug. 24, 2008, 08:32 AM
Is this really an appropriate name for a horse? Nothing against Jill Henselwood--I think she had some great rides. I usually scorn those who go overboard on political correctness, but as the mother of a child who will always be in special ed, I found it a bit... wrong. Am I being overly sensitive?

Overo Kid
Aug. 24, 2008, 08:58 AM
I would think it would mean Special Edition, but I can see how it could be seen the other way, too. And as you say, a reminder to everyone with children in Special Ed no matter what the name really means.

gottagrey
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:12 AM
Yes, I think you are being overly sensitive. While taking your personal situation aside - it might be that the horse is an EDWARD or EDGAR and that because he is so talented that makes him SPECIAL hence SPECIAL ED, having nothing to do with Special Education. And does Canada refer to or use the same terminology as the US when it comes to Special Education? If not then Special Ed would not necessarily be a reference to Education.

Janet
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:30 AM
On another thread, someone stated that the name came becaus he was intended to be a dressage horse, but wasn't very good at it.

So the message is that even if you are "challenged" in one area, you can suceed in another.

Fixerupper
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:31 AM
Why ever would you not look at it as a celebration of the concept of special education?? The horse is clearly a winner, why would you not like that association.

DownYonder
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:32 AM
Special Ed is the cover story in the latest issue of The Oldenburg Horse magazine. He was born in Germany and originally named Adiemus (had to be an "A" name since his sire is the legendary stallion Argentinus). He was originally purchased to be a dressage horse but turned out to be too spooky so his owner sent him to Jill Henselwood to try out as a jumper. He took a long time to make up due to his penchant for spooking at ANYTHING out of the ordinary - a new flower pot, a jump pole laying on the ground where it hadn't been the day before, etc. That's why he got renamed "Special Ed". It took "special education" to make him the world class competitor he is today.

fish
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:45 AM
On another thread, someone stated that the name came becaus he was intended to be a dressage horse, but wasn't very good at it.

So the message is that even if you are "challenged" in one area, you can suceed in another.

I heard the same thing, and therefore think the name is quite the opposite of derogatory to those with disabilities-- especially considering that Michael Phelps was diagnosed ADHD and initially got into swimming because it was such good therapy for him.

I also have 2 children (and a mother, and a brother) with various disabilities/learning disorders, and was not offended by this horse's name at all. There are times when people DO make remarks/jokes which are in fact insulting, and these do anger me. I don't think this horse's name is one of them. Instead, it is (IMO) a beautiful reminder of the fact that given appropriate training/therapy, an individual who is handicapped in some areas can often turn out to be quite gifted in others-- or even the same -- area(s) if given appropriate opportunities. (e.g., my severely dyslexic daughter is now a professor of creative writing, my brother --who was twice held back in grade school-- is an inventor/scientist who frequently has PhD's working under him.)

JessandLoki
Aug. 24, 2008, 10:17 AM
Special Ed is the cover story in the latest issue of The Oldenburg Horse magazine. He was born in Germany and originally named Adiemus (had to be an "A" name since his sire is the legendary stallion Argentinus). He was originally purchased to be a dressage horse but turned out to be too spooky so his owner sent him to Jill Henselwood to try out as a jumper. He took a long time to make up due to his penchant for spooking at ANYTHING out of the ordinary - a new flower pot, a jump pole laying on the ground where it hadn't been the day before, etc. That's why he got renamed "Special Ed". It took "special education" to make him the world class competitor he is today.



Neat story! Gives all of us with slightly "special" horses some hope! And, just for the record I have a mathematical learning disability-which is similar to dyslexia, I take my math classes in the special education department and I don't think it's anything to be ashamed of at all :cool:

jse
Aug. 24, 2008, 10:37 AM
Neat story! Gives all of us with slightly "special" horses some hope! And, just for the record I have a mathematical learning disability-which is similar to dyslexia, I take my math classes in the special education department and I don't think it's anything to be ashamed of at all :cool:

I also had a mathematical disability and took math classes in the special ed. dept. To this day, it's nothing I am ashamed of.
I love the story behind Special Ed. He's a real neat horse and boy does he take care of his rider! She's an awesome awesome rider, but those nerves just get the best of her sometimes.
I saw her ride him in Culpeper at the end of last summer, they were quite the incredible pair! :)

gottagrey
Aug. 24, 2008, 11:11 AM
I stand corrected - he's not a Special Edward or Edgar shortened to Ed. but he is Special.

Ravencrest_Camp
Aug. 24, 2008, 11:44 AM
The only reason he is called Special Ed is that the owners first choice, Youth in Asia was already taken. :yes:

perpetual_novice
Aug. 24, 2008, 12:00 PM
I heard the same thing, and therefore think the name is quite the opposite of derogatory to those with disabilities-- especially considering that Michael Phelps was diagnosed ADHD and initially got into swimming because it was such good therapy for him.

I also have 2 children (and a mother, and a brother) with various disabilities/learning disorders, and was not offended by this horse's name at all. There are times when people DO make remarks/jokes which are in fact insulting, and these do anger me. I don't think this horse's name is one of them. Instead, it is (IMO) a beautiful reminder of the fact that given appropriate training/therapy, an individual who is handicapped in some areas can often turn out to be quite gifted in others-- or even the same -- area(s) if given appropriate opportunities. (e.g., my severely dyslexic daughter is now a professor of creative writing, my brother --who was twice held back in grade school-- is an inventor/scientist who frequently has PhD's working under him.)

I have to admit the first couple of time I heard Special Ed's name, I winced as I have a child with LD and work with children who are in Special Education programs. But now I agree wholeheartedly with fish's comments.

2boys
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:17 PM
Yeah, as a special education teacher and one who lives with ADHD, I was initially unsure what to think. I do love his story, and wonder HOW IN H*** that trainer brought him from super spooky to being IN THE OLYMPICS. You can't much closer to a "horsie sped success story"! A lot of humans who seem to hide behind their disablities could learn from Jill and her horse--nice message, actually!:yes:

Beverley
Aug. 24, 2008, 09:36 PM
Speaking as the Mom of a son who had several years of 'special ed,' I love the name. Alternative learning for those who need it is a lifesaver. My son caught up with his reading by 5th grade and went back to 'mainstream.' For him it was relief, not shame.

I'd be happy to load that horse in my trailer and take him home too.:) But I wouldn't change his name.

springer
Aug. 25, 2008, 12:42 PM
Is this really an appropriate name for a horse? Nothing against Jill Henselwood--I think she had some great rides. I usually scorn those who go overboard on political correctness, but as the mother of a child who will always be in special ed, I found it a bit... wrong. Am I being overly sensitive?

Yes

mayhew
Aug. 26, 2008, 09:18 AM
Interesting story on the horse, and interesting interpretations of the name. I took it as a joke at the expense of a) the horse and b) special ed students, but I like all of your interpretations better. :)

LisaB
Aug. 26, 2008, 09:39 AM
Well, I take offense to an eventer in Europe called Son of a Bitch :D

MEANDMOKA
Aug. 26, 2008, 10:00 AM
YES,Way overly sensitive.

I think many people need to relax and stop looking for some reason to be offended.:yes:

It is a cute name, do you actually think she named her horse something she knew would be offensive? especially in this world of politically correctness.:no: Being on the international stage that she is on?


Lighten up people, not everything is done to offend YOU.

Try watching Graham Norton on BBC America and watch how people in other countries laugh at each other.....not get offended.....great show by the way!

Getting offended at everything and political correctness seems to be a North American thing. We need to get over ourselves......Life is too short to be pissed off all the time

mayhew
Aug. 26, 2008, 03:31 PM
I'm Canadian, but thanks anyway.

Ilex
Aug. 27, 2008, 01:10 PM
I'm Canadian, but thanks anyway.

Errrmmmmm you still live in North America. Don't cha.

LOL (with you...not at you)

harvestmoon
Aug. 27, 2008, 02:11 PM
I'm Canadian, but thanks anyway.

So Canada is on the continent of Canada now is it? ;)

As for the name...well, yes, you may be a bit overly sensitive. I was in the "special ed" class in HS and the name doesn't offend me. If anything I'm quite touched that they chose to name the horse that. Anyway, all the cool people went to special ed. ;)

Mozart
Aug. 27, 2008, 02:13 PM
In mayhew's defence, I think the post she was referring to was edited to be North America from America. I think.

harvestmoon
Aug. 27, 2008, 02:26 PM
Ah, I see. Thanks! Sorry, then, Mayhew. :)

MEANDMOKA
Sep. 1, 2008, 11:09 AM
Nope Sorry I corrected a spelling error I noticed after reading a reply. In looking back I guess it is close to the next reply so it looks like I changed content.

I neglected to enter reason for edit...it should be "spelling error"

Not that any of this stuff matters anymore anyway.:cool:

Janeway
Sep. 2, 2008, 01:15 PM
Well, I take offense to an eventer in Europe called Son of a Bitch :D

I remember how that name took me by surprise the first time I saw it! But then I heard the story about how he really was the son of a bitch: according to his rider Anna Hasso his dam was an incredibly witchy, difficult, yet talented horse. SOB was apparently quite an improvement in temperment! :winkgrin:

ScotTNMe
Sep. 3, 2008, 08:34 PM
Yes I did a bit of a double take when I first heard Ed's name too, but it can go both ways and I think he's definitely "special" in whatever way you care to interpret it! When I was at Spruce two or three years ago, a couple of teenage girls beside me were quite amused by the name and were giggling and laughing up a storm. Anyway, what's in a name and Ed's certainly a success story now :yes:!