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nero
Aug. 11, 2008, 11:53 PM
http://www.smh.com.au/news/equestrian/dashing-teen-rider-comes-back-to-earth/2008/08/12/1218306841782.html

Does anyone else think he's riding a bit long. His horse did a nice dressage test until is had a throw down, nice extended trot, good mover in general.

belambi
Aug. 11, 2008, 11:57 PM
Loved his test..the USA judges marks were a disgrace imho.

Kenike
Aug. 12, 2008, 01:22 AM
What a nice article! I think we'll definitely see more of him in the future. :)

Anne FS
Aug. 12, 2008, 01:25 PM
I wish him all the best and hope to see more of him. The WSJ said the FEI ranks him 19th in the world. I certainly didn't know that! The WSJ also said:

"Mr. Hua’s route would be difficult to duplicate. .....After Mr. Hua showed signs of promise as a 17-year-old rider, a Chinese property developer named Jiang Fengcan agreed to bankroll his training expenses, including purchasing six Olympic-ready horses-a total outlay of nearly $4 million."

Pretty cool.

Dixon
Aug. 12, 2008, 01:58 PM
Never trust the Wall Street Journal's coverage of anything equestrian-related. Remember the WSJ article about the 65-yr old Japanese dressage rider, which described dressage as "the obscure sport of horse ballet, and contained descriptions of the movements and tests that demonstrated lack of any equestrian knowledge whatsoever? See http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=141103&highlight=japanese

The WSJ fabricated Hua's 19th place FEI ranking. WSJ must have been spoon-fed that stat by the Hong Kong businessman who sponsors Hua, and then failed to fact-check.

The WSJ is a corporate and financial voice, with an agenda to increase the wealth of the wealthy. This British kid of Chinese descent gets coverage and attention because of the businessman sponsoring him. Don't think for a minute that some HK businessman would buy an unrelated kid $4 million worth of made, Olympic-ready horses and not promote the hell out of the kid in the media, including in the WSJ.

Anne FS
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:03 PM
This British kid of Chinese descent gets coverage and attention because of the businessman sponsoring him. Don't think for a minute that some HK businessman would buy an unrelated kid $4 million worth of made, Olympic-ready horses and not promote the hell out of the kid in the media, including in the WSJ.

Well, DUH! (LOL!) Of course that's why (the $ spent) it was in the WSJ!

That part I got, and I should have put in the rolling-eyes icon about his FEI ranking but I didn't want to seem to be criticizing the rider instead of the WSJ.

Lexi
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:27 PM
The WSJ fabricated Hua's 19th place FEI ranking. WSJ must have been spoon-fed that stat by the Hong Kong businessman who sponsors Hua, and then failed to fact-check.

Fact checking clearly just isn't appealing to you, is it, when you can instead have another opportunity to attack the Chinese?

As of the latest FEI world ranking (31 July) (http://www.fei.org/Disciplines/Eventing/Results/Pages/HSBC_Online_Rankings.aspx)Alex was ranked 21st, so not at all unfeasible that an earlier month's ranking list had him at 19th. He has 4 advanced horses going right now, IIRC.

Please find another outlet for your offensive prejudices.

Dixon
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:37 PM
Nice try Lexi, but your link is to a webpage that cannot be found. Not sure why you're trying to support made-up stats with a made-up website?

Bottom line is, the kid couldn't stay on when his horse clipped a jump. That's not an Olympic-caliber rider, just a well-financed and promoted rider who bought his way into the Olympics.

Lexi
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:41 PM
Since when does a bad hyperlink = a "made-up website"? The link worked fine for me, but here it is in multiple forms:

http://www.fei.org/Disciplines/Eventing/Results/Documents/C_rankings-July-2.pdf
http://www.fei.org/Disciplines/Eventing/Results/Pages/HSBC_Online_Rankings.aspx

ika
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:43 PM
Nice try Lexi, but your link is to a webpage that cannot be found. Not sure why you're trying to support made-up stats with a made-up website?

Actually her link accidentally had some extra characters at the end. The correct link is here: http://www.fei.org/Disciplines/Eventing/Results/Pages/HSBC_Online_Rankings.aspx

It does show that he is currently in 21st place.

Lexi
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:45 PM
Bottom line is, the kid couldn't stay on when his horse clipped a jump. That's not an Olympic-caliber rider, just a well-financed and promoted rider who bought his way into the Olympics.ah, and now you change your attack, knowing that you have been called out on your original bullshit. Pathetic.

ponyjumper4
Aug. 12, 2008, 02:56 PM
Nice try Lexi, but your link is to a webpage that cannot be found. Not sure why you're trying to support made-up stats with a made-up website?

Bottom line is, the kid couldn't stay on when his horse clipped a jump. That's not an Olympic-caliber rider, just a well-financed and promoted rider who bought his way into the Olympics.


Except that you can't buy your way into the Olympics, YOU STILL HAVE TO QUALIFY.

Glimmerglass
Aug. 12, 2008, 03:01 PM
Good lord, thankfully when I posted this same story yesterday morning from the WSJ in this forum it wasn't followed by so much bitterness.

JERinNJ
Aug. 12, 2008, 03:04 PM
Except that you can't buy your way into the Olympics, YOU STILL HAVE TO QUALIFY.

Actually I think you automatically get a bid if you're the home country but he did qualify multiple mounts either way!

I think he is a damn good rider. He fell because his horse took an unlucky stumble at a more vertical, unforgiving fence. Either way, he's a pretty fantastic rider. And, he's AMAZING for 18!

fiona
Aug. 12, 2008, 03:09 PM
I'm going to weigh in here because i've seen this boy ride in real life in competitions all over england this season. He is a very talented, hardworking, committed rider - he qualified fair and square, yes he has big financial backing but he stepped up and he deserved to be there.

Personally i was gutted when he made a mistake.

monicabee
Aug. 12, 2008, 03:41 PM
Alex Hua Tian is hardly an unknown - at least in China and the UK. He has natural talent - and he gave up his British dual citizenship through his mother to compete. Yes, that gave him a shot at the Olympics he wouldn't otherwise have had, but it is also means he give up any future opportunities to compete for the UK.

It is not suprising that the WSJ picked up on his story - backing an eventer is the ultimate high-risk investment.

vineyridge
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:04 PM
I just managed to see the Oxygen cross country, and they showed his fall. :eek:

That kid was very lucky that he didn't end up like Laine Ashker. If he had gone straight off instead of being thrown to the side, we'd have had another rotational fall to talk about. :eek:

ponyjumper4
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:16 PM
Actually I think you automatically get a bid if you're the home country but he did qualify multiple mounts either way!

No, that just means the country can field a competitor without having to qualify. We have to qualify to get a team eligible for the Olympics through some of the international competitions like the Pan Ams or worlds, etc by some of our team placings. I think we were in danger of not being able to field a showjumping team at a recent Olympics and had to medal at one of the big international team championships to qualify. This was discussed in another thread. China became eligible to have an entry because it is the host nation, but the competitor still had to qualify--that keeps them from just throwing a team together and putting them out there on a course like that.

fiona
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:18 PM
every time we fall - and get up - we're lucky.

talkofthetown
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:21 PM
Bottom line is, the kid couldn't stay on when his horse clipped a jump. That's not an Olympic-caliber rider, just a well-financed and promoted rider who bought his way into the Olympics.

So does that mean that once you've got yourself to the Olympics, you can't fall off anymore? And that if you do fall off, you shouldn't have been there in the first place?

Quick, someone go tell Karen and David and Philip, etc.. they shouldn't fall off anymore. :rolleyes:

Can't we just hold off on the critical comments, maybe for one day at least? Celebrate the fact that overall, the Games this year (eventing at least) were successful, and no one was seriously injured.

FMulder
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:33 PM
Aimed only at those who so unjustly criticise Alex H T.

Alex is a friend of mine, and some of you here are talking absolute BS. What kind of people are you, that you can make such prejudiced and unecessary comments?

He trained his ass off, and I'm confident that there's not one person on this entire board can ride anything like his standard. When was the last time any of you got selected for Olympics? (or went further than a 3' fence for that matter) He QUALIFIED four horses for the Games, that means HE qualified them, not anyone else. Yes they were good horses, well sourced and appropriate for the job. Would you prefer he find crappola horses? What would you do? Find crap and try to make it good, and turn down any good horses because you want to "do it the right way"?

Yes, there was a big sponsor, and the number came out at around £1.8M. Of course, you'd all turn it down, as you'd rather all qualify on your outstanding natural talent (we're still waiting). Yes, he has been trained for a number of years by the Fredericks, if you want to qualify go train with the best.

Fontainebleau and Saumur are not exactly easy 3* events, but he did the job and qualified.

Trust me, if any of you have 10% of the talent he has, you'd cut your right arms off to have had his opportunities.

Believe me when I tell you, that he'll be gutted that he came off and will personally feel he let his country, horse, sponsors and trainers down.

He is THE most polite, kind and considerate boy i've met, and if any of you are lucky enough to meet him, you'll find the same.

Eventer13
Aug. 12, 2008, 04:57 PM
Watching him ride online, he looked like the real deal. Unlucky fall at the Olympics (it actually reminded me of a certain American who rode earlier that day). He may have a truckload of cash to help him along, but there is no reason to criticise his riding.

Equibrit
Aug. 12, 2008, 05:02 PM
He had the best dressage seat of the lot of 'em.

Anne FS
Aug. 12, 2008, 05:04 PM
Believe me when I tell you, that he'll be gutted that he came off and will personally feel he let his country, horse, sponsors and trainers down.


Well, since you're a friend of his PLEASE convince him that he did no such thing!!
As others have said, an unlucky fall, and look at all the support he got even after the difficulty of his dressage ride. Good grief, Karen O'Connor had refusals! Amy Tryon fell off, and who was the Aussie rider that had a STUNNING ride and his horse came down at the next to last fence?

It was WONDERFUL to represent his country for the very first time in Eventing, and I think his country and his trainers and his horse and almost everybody here is very proud of him! At 18 he's got another 40 years of making the Chinese team! Good luck to him, say I.

Mozart
Aug. 12, 2008, 05:10 PM
I think only Dixon criticized him. The guy can clearly ride. And he is all of EIGHTEEN. Quite a lot of composure in one so young, I say. Most of the eighteen year olds I know can barely find their way to the mall, let alone to the Olympics.

He may have had his pick of some very nice horses, he still has to ride them.

Glimmerglass
Aug. 12, 2008, 05:10 PM
He may have a truckload of cash to help him along, but there is no reason to criticise his riding.

Actually the article suggested other(s) have the money to fund him not unlike the polo patrons or even Team O'Connor which is largely backed by Jacqueline Mars (http://www.forbes.com/lists/2007/54/richlist07_Jacqueline-Mars_MY2E.html), etc. So where the money comes from or how much is paid is unrelated and irrelevant

paohatch
Aug. 12, 2008, 05:15 PM
Originally Posted by Dixon
Bottom line is, the kid couldn't stay on when his horse clipped a jump. That's not an Olympic-caliber rider, just a well-financed and promoted rider who bought his way into the Olympics.

So does that mean that once you've got yourself to the Olympics, you can't fall off anymore? And that if you do fall off, you shouldn't have been there in the first place?

Quick, someone go tell Karen and David and Philip, etc.. they shouldn't fall off anymore.


OMG.. yeah... like one of the best riders on the easternshore of MD who is a brave quadrapelegic now ... I guess good riders don't fall off.

Oh.. an home country's do get a team entry into every sport... that's how the Chinese are in things like Whitewater Kayaking, :lol: