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View Full Version : Water Tanks for Trailering Excursions



jazzrider
Jun. 7, 2008, 06:40 PM
A recent prolonged power outage in our area forced me to run down to Tractor Supply to buy a water tank. I had planned to search for tank for our horse trailer that would fit nicely on the roof of the trailer or in the tack room (we haul with a bumber pull with a Suburban, so no pick up bed). But I ended up with this...

http://www.mytscstore.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay_10551_10001_34375_______14345|14384 |14396|34375?listingPage=true

It's fine, though not what I had hoped for. I was hoping to find a stand for it of some sort, to lift it up a foot or two to help gravity, but I've been googling and can't find anything.

So, are there stands for water tanks out there?

And on another note, what do you "serious" trail riders use for water transport? What have you found works best, and worst?

Jaegermonster
Jun. 7, 2008, 10:18 PM
I got two big blue water things with spigots on them in the camping section at Wal Mart.
I put them in the truck bed (I have a GN) and drop the tail gate and fill the buckets that way.
My friend with a BP and a suburban got the same ones, and she just opens the back and fills the buckets up from there.
Way easier and cheaper than the stand up things you buy for the dressing room. Those things are a pain to drain and clean (which you must do fairly regularly or they will grow funk)

gypsymare
Jun. 8, 2008, 01:25 AM
My dad sells industrial laundry chemicals and gets these 15 gallon blue tanks that are just perfect. They're cylindrical, about 18" in diameter and about 2 1/2 feet tall (roughly guessing her [edit- just checked, they're only 14"x26"). Stand nicely in the corner of the dressing room and since they're so tall it's not so hard to tip them over into a bucket, but they've never fallen over while driving (even SLAMMING on my brakes in St. Louis). 3" diameter drain on top with a 1" drain opposite. Pours really nice. I have two but with only one horse one is plenty unless it's an overnighter. I don't even cap them, they don't slosh much and I can't find the caps anyhow :)

Oooh I found a pic of one for sale online:
http://www.bizrate.com/watergarden_irrigationsupplies/oid480941054.html

joe21
Jun. 8, 2008, 02:54 AM
I picked up a plastic water carrier that looks like a "trunk." It has some cup holders and a small storage compartment on the top. It also acts as a nice bench seat.

A hose attached to a spigot at the bottom. Hold about 25 gallons. It sits in the dressing room of the trailer, which is high enough to let gravity fill buckets on the ground.

The whole thing was pretty inexpensive and is very light and portable (when empty or course).

Here is a link to it:
http://www.horse.com/Farm-Ranch-Supplies/Trailer-Accessories/Water-Tank-Tack-Trunk-Combo-BSL16.html

Guilherme
Jun. 8, 2008, 08:06 AM
I've got a "corner tank" that fits in the mid tack. It's nice because it uses otherwise "waste space." It holds about 35 gal. I bought a $5 piece of short hose from HomeDepot and it fills buckets nicely.

I also have two 6 gal. "jerry cans" that fit in the rear tack. I can fill them from either the corner tank or a spigot. On can will fill two two horse buckets.

In addition we bought a small wagon with folding sides at Tractor Supply. It's nice if you have to move water any distance. :cool:

G.

jazzrider
Jun. 8, 2008, 06:29 PM
I got two big blue water things with spigots on them in the camping section at Wal Mart.


That's exactly what we have been using, though when we do an overnight it's just not enough.

Joe21 -- I'm jealous, that's the one that I was looking at before necessity sent me to Tractor Supply! I was also looking at the corner tank Guilherme, but I have welded hooks in my tack room that would have gotten in the way.

But now I'm stuck with what I've got. So, no one has seen a water tank stand?

joe21
Jun. 8, 2008, 08:11 PM
almost forgot...

in a real pinch, put trash can liners in your water buckets. Fill the buckets, then tie the tops of the bags. When you get to the destination, just cut the bag open and remove from the buckets.

Not a great long term solution, but can come in handy.

chicamuxen1
Jun. 9, 2008, 09:48 AM
Jazzrider, I actually have the same tank from TSC, just larger. It sits in the bed of my pickup and I have a 12 VDC water pump attached to it. This way I can fill buckets quickly and hose off a horse. I have the pump wired into a plug that plugs into the receptacle on my bumper for trailers. I just unplug the trailer and plug in the tanks pump. If you have a 12 volt marine battery on your trailer that charges off your vehicle you could tie a pump into your trailer wiring. Or have an RV place do it for you (simplest solution). I know a lot of folks don't have batteries on their bumper pull trailers but it is so nice to have extra lights mounted, run a pump, etc when you camp.

Bonnie

Auventera Two
Jun. 9, 2008, 09:51 AM
Seriously? Buckets with screw on lids. Portable, easily fillable, easy to store. Multi-purpose, too -- you can use them to carry other stuff when they are empty..

That's what I use too but will eventually buy a tank for the back of the truck. You can buy them at farm supply stores for anywhere from $50-$200 depending on the size.

cheryl ann
Jun. 9, 2008, 10:19 AM
I'm using both food grade pails w/ screw down lids and the blue containers w/spigots from Wal-mart.

A caution on using trash-can liners. Many have insecticide impregnated into them.

I would like to find a small barrel or two (less than 50 gallons, due to weight) with a spigot on the bottom, that I can keep in the truck bed.

P.s. Something else I have seen lately, is the blue spigot 5gal container that is mounted on wheels. About $30 +/- at the local sporting goods store. Kinda pricey, but another option.

chicamuxen1
Jun. 9, 2008, 10:47 AM
I started out with a big plastic barrel with the spigot, then added the pump but the barrels were a PIA. I couldn't get inside to scrub them out and when a tank sits in the sun with water in it it can grow algae. It really got very frustrating. I went to the 65 gal tank with the big screw off opening at the top and was much happier. Just had to spend the money.

Bonnie

jazzrider
Jun. 9, 2008, 11:28 AM
Jazzrider, I actually have the same tank from TSC, just larger. It sits in the bed of my pickup and I have a 12 VDC water pump attached to it. This way I can fill buckets quickly and hose off a horse. I have the pump wired into a plug that plugs into the receptacle on my bumper for trailers. I just unplug the trailer and plug in the tanks pump. If you have a 12 volt marine battery on your trailer that charges off your vehicle you could tie a pump into your trailer wiring. Or have an RV place do it for you (simplest solution). I know a lot of folks don't have batteries on their bumper pull trailers but it is so nice to have extra lights mounted, run a pump, etc when you camp.

Bonnie

Thanks Bonnie. Great idea. I just cut and pasted your post into an e-mail to my hubby and said "make it so." :D I hate technical stuff. ;)

gabz
Jun. 10, 2008, 03:48 PM
I have the 30-35 gallon tank from High Country Plastics that is also a saddle rack. I can put it in the bed of the pickup or in the back of the slant load GN (I have no rear tack, so I put it there). I built a small wood frame to raise it up off the floor. My trailer aide and my hose fit in the space under the tank.

Having it in the back of the trailer is great because then I take my saddle out of the DR area and put it on the tank when camping.

For short, day trips, I use the square blue 5 gallon containers.
one VERY important thing I did to my blue containers was to put 2 layers of duct tape on the bottoms and partway up the sides. That way, the duct tape takes the brunt of scrapes and that sort of thing, delaying the demise of my tanks. I've had the 5 gallon jugs for 6 years and use them daily between house and barn to carry "goat bucket" water.

To clean out the "scrunge" in water containers:
Dissolve 1/4 - 1/3 cup of Automatic dishwasher detergent in a gallon or so of very hot water. Pour into the water container and slosh, slosh, slosh. Let it sit awhile if you want. slosh some more. It's the agitation and the 'grit' of the detergent that will clean the surfaces. Then, add more water and continue to slosh. Rinse completely all surfaces at least 2 times, preferably 4 times as dishwasher detergent has lye in it!

I like to do this in the fall, then I leave the cap off and check several times during the next 24 hours to get ALL moisture out (Use a fan if you have to) and then I replace the cap LOOSELY so that moisture doesn't build up.

As a safety tip. No matter where you go, when hauling, always carry at least 5 gallons of water per horse. You never know if you will break down or have some sort of emergency. In my case, my horse was stung and climbed into the fixed manger. I used my jugs of water to pour over him to cool him off after we got him out of his predictament.

If you are in an area where water is precious, you can return home and empty the jug into a water bucket or tank.

CBudFrggy
Jun. 11, 2008, 01:54 PM
almost forgot...

in a real pinch, put trash can liners in your water buckets. Fill the buckets, then tie the tops of the bags. When you get to the destination, just cut the bag open and remove from the buckets.

Not a great long term solution, but can come in handy.

Or to store more water, put trash can liners in your muck buckets. This holds about 18 gallons each. Two will roughly last 2 horses on 2 overnights.

LittlePaint
Jun. 11, 2008, 01:58 PM
I picked up a plastic water carrier that looks like a "trunk." It has some cup holders and a small storage compartment on the top. It also acts as a nice bench seat.

A hose attached to a spigot at the bottom. Hold about 25 gallons. It sits in the dressing room of the trailer, which is high enough to let gravity fill buckets on the ground.

The whole thing was pretty inexpensive and is very light and portable (when empty or course).

Here is a link to it:
http://www.horse.com/Farm-Ranch-Supplies/Trailer-Accessories/Water-Tank-Tack-Trunk-Combo-BSL16.html




This is what I have to... I only bought it as a friend was selling it, and sold it cheap.... :)
Tara

NC Trail Girl
Jun. 11, 2008, 02:26 PM
DH works with Chemicals, so we get all sorts of liquid containers.
My fav. ones are the ones that pure chlorine/bleach come in. I know they are clean ;), and they have a screw cap and air cap. They are about 15gallons and have a handle. They are perfect for camping. I fill them, and cap them off.
DH built a spigot that screws into the cap opening. It's great. I just roll the barrel onto it's side (at camp) and I have a faucet off the back of the truck.

Course there is no great pressure. I may have to invest in one of those pumps. Sounds like they come in handy ;)

CanterQueen
Jun. 12, 2008, 07:23 AM
I have the 30-35 gallon tank from High Country Plastics that is also a saddle rack. I can put it in the bed of the pickup

I have this one as well. Take it with me whenever we ride away from home. Love it. http://estore.websitepros.com/1355535/Detail.bok?no=14

gabz
Jun. 12, 2008, 02:34 PM
CanterQueen -
This tank is very versatile; but to anyone else, it is NOT tall enough for western saddles - which is why I built a wood "rack" to raise it up about 8". Which is okay, because that gives me storage for the wheelchock/trailer aid and hose. : )

CanterQueen
Jun. 13, 2008, 06:44 AM
gabz,

It's tall enough for mine -- probably the ONLY advantage to being a mere 5' tall with 26" inseams. I have to special order my Bob Marshall saddles so the fenders are short enough!! :D:D:D:D:D

Stella J
Jun. 15, 2008, 05:05 PM
I have one of these as well, but unless you drain it completly after use, it will grow all kinds of "stuff" and is a real pain to clean out. I have never had any luck getting sufficent gravity induced water pressure to hose off a horse from the back of the truck. I am currently using a 5 gallon water cooler (you know those round orange ones you see at work sites). You can bunge the lid on, and use the spiggot on the bottom to fill your bucket. I am also truing out a large square cooler that is on wheels - especially for moving water around campsites.

gabz
Jun. 16, 2008, 05:58 PM
I have one of these as well, but unless you drain it completly after use, it will grow all kinds of "stuff" and is a real pain to clean out. I have never had any luck getting sufficent gravity induced water pressure to hose off a horse from the back of the truck. I am currently using a 5 gallon water cooler (you know those round orange ones you see at work sites). You can bunge the lid on, and use the spiggot on the bottom to fill your bucket. I am also truing out a large square cooler that is on wheels - especially for moving water around campsites.

If I have to haul water, I use it sparingly - so I will typically re-use horse drinking water** by pouring it into a "wash" bucket, add some liniment to it, and then use a sponge to wash areas of the horse that need it. Dump the remainder of this "wash" water over the horse where needed. I do NOT use liniment water on the face.

When I return home and there's still some water in the container, I add a cup or 2 of bleach, slosh around (sometimes laying it on each side for a day or so) and then empty. I tip / prop the tank onto the end with the inlet/outlet, with both open, and let dry. I think using the bleach is critical to killing anything inside that could "grow".

I have also used dental floss to tie my black inlet cap to the little air cap so as to not leave it laying someplace. : )

I got perturbed at some folks who used my blue 5 gallon containers and never let them air dry between uses. They developed a scrunge inside, on the bottom. :no: That's when I used the automatic dishwasher granules to help remove that scrunge... it didn't take it all out, but I figured they were as clean as they were going to be. Leaving all openings OPEN to let the container dry is the best way to avoid yuck. It's easy enough to rinse out any bugs that may have crawled in, in between uses.: )

**-re-using horse drinking water explained: If there is water left in the drinking bucket, I pour that into a wash bucket. Then, the horse gets fresh water in the drinking bucket.

BroncoHollow
Jun. 16, 2008, 06:35 PM
Short rides, we have a corner water tank - 35 gallons. The bucket holders on the side of the trailer are nice too, eliminates them dumping the buckets over. Before the corner tank we used the 5 gallon water containers you can buy at any sporting goods store for camping.

Camping.... we buy the 55 gallon plastic containers that held apple juice for about 7.00 to 10.00 each. Baking soda and a small amount of bleach to clean them out and rinse them good. Hubby made a PVC pipe and connectors to a flex hose with a pump that we plug into the adapter or cigarette lighter for power to pump the water out of the tanks. Works great!

gabz
Jun. 16, 2008, 06:39 PM
Oh, Bronco Hollow reminded me of another way to "dry" tanks... use an air compressor or the reverse end of a shop vac. : )

Blueskidoo
Jun. 16, 2008, 07:51 PM
What kind of water pump are you guys using?

I just bought a 40 gallon container for my trailer and I would love to be able to hose a horse after a trail ride.

Thanks!

BroncoHollow
Jun. 16, 2008, 09:25 PM
We use a 12 volt Shurflow - same as what you would have in an RV. You can wash horses down or even shower yourself with it. Can buy them at any RV Supply or even Cabelas... around 59.00 to 69.00 dollars. :)