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View Full Version : Hay feeders tha look like a house...???



asanders
Apr. 13, 2008, 09:30 AM
I just looked at the post about round bales and realized doh. Someone on this BB will know about this...

In searching for a covered round bale feeder, I found one that was available from a seller in Lancaster PA, and somewhere in Canada. Basically, it looked like a Little Tykes play houseon steroids.

It was square, had a floor, molded ag grade pvc (or cousin) sides --complete with look of crossrail fence that had 2 big 'windows' per side, and a molded roof. It could be opened into two sides (like a giant doll house) to load. You could actually buy singe half to put against a wall.

I think they were around $500 plus ship to FL and I thought 'looks cool, but I'd never order one without talking to someone that has at least seen them'

After looking at the round bale thread, I tried to find the website again, and can't.

Can someone tell me what they were called, and has anybody actually got one?

2hsmommy
Apr. 13, 2008, 09:50 AM
I saw them in the Virginia horse journal or Horse talk magazine. Both are online btw, so try a search.

asanders
Apr. 13, 2008, 10:08 AM
They are Duplessis Feeders
http://www.horse.on.ca/directory/farm_supplies.html

and ha ha on me, when I googled duplessis hay feeder, the first thing that came up was a COTH thread.:)

Still looking for fresh comments...

Evalee Hunter
Apr. 13, 2008, 12:05 PM
I have seen them in use as a TB farm near here has one in the broodmare field. We do not have one, but I drive by & look at theirs.

mht
Apr. 13, 2008, 12:56 PM
I have two of these feeders and they are great. I saved so much hay this year from the horses not being able to toss it about that one hard-core round bale will do five mares for at least a week, and my horses are on 24/7 turn-out. Even my husband, who always complains about having to deal with 'those damn horses' thinks the hay huts are more than worth the money, espcially with the price and availability of hay these days!

Bluey
Apr. 13, 2008, 01:36 PM
Here is the USA representative, since they are a canadian firm:

http://www.duplessishorsefeeder.com/Feeder8USA.html

stellabella
Apr. 13, 2008, 04:56 PM
Love it!

pura vide
Dec. 1, 2008, 12:25 AM
They are Duplessis Feeders
http://www.horse.on.ca/directory/farm_supplies.html

and ha ha on me, when I googled duplessis hay feeder, the first thing that came up was a COTH thread.:)

Still looking for fresh comments...
Those covered hay feeders are now available in Florida BTW.- There is a video link at http://www.palominowarmbloods.com/hay.html So you can see how simple they are to use. They save a lot of hay and money and labor!

Bluey
Dec. 1, 2008, 07:15 AM
We have never fed big bales.
I am afraid that, with our rattler problem, we may have horses bitten if we have such bales around, much less in such places, that those snakes love to get into.

JSwan
Dec. 1, 2008, 08:22 AM
Some newcomer up the road bought one of those. The first time I saw it the horses were eating the hay and I thought they all had their heads stuck in some kid's dollhouse. I can see that thing becoming a faded brittle piece of junk eventually. But that's true of most farm equipment isn't it.

I think it's a waste of money and would eventually become a happy haven for lots of wasps and mud daubers. But whatever works for you is just dandy. :)

7HL
Dec. 1, 2008, 08:41 AM
I have seen this one made by Eberly Barns in Lancaster.

http://www.eberlybarns.net/hayracks.cfm

justdandy
Dec. 1, 2008, 09:51 AM
Some newcomer up the road bought one of those. The first time I saw it the horses were eating the hay and I thought they all had their heads stuck in some kid's dollhouse. I can see that thing becoming a faded brittle piece of junk eventually. But that's true of most farm equipment isn't it.

I think it's a waste of money and would eventually become a happy haven for lots of wasps and mud daubers. But whatever works for you is just dandy. :)

Hey, now.....no need to bring my name into it!:winkgrin::lol:

I thought the same thing as you about these. I was also wondering if they sweat and if so, how much mold that would cause.

Waterwitch
Dec. 1, 2008, 11:08 AM
Here is a much less expensive version of the duplessis style feeder, manufactured in Missouri:

Bale Bonnet (http://www.coonmfginc.com/products/agricultural.html)

mothermucker12
Dec. 1, 2008, 05:55 PM
saw these at the horse expo last year, i think i remember them saying that you need a tractor to lift them up in order to place them over the round bale

cherham
Dec. 1, 2008, 06:13 PM
Yes those are the Duplessis models. Manufactured in Quebec. They are somewhat popular here (in Southern Ontario) and from what I have seen in the fields are holding up OK so far. The oldest I have seen is only about 2 years though. With our hot humid summers and freezing cold winters so far so good. What I wonder about is the UV life of the plastic however. For almost $600.00 apiece I would like to think they will last at least 10 years or so....time will tell.

They are manufactured in two components...both of which can be handled easily by one person or lifted together and moved by a tractor.

godoget
Dec. 1, 2008, 06:23 PM
Here's another source. They are French Canadian but they are located in NC.


http://www.fgreiningcollection.com/Home.html


You'll need a tractor anyway to move the round bales.

asanders
Dec. 1, 2008, 11:12 PM
I did find these (the duplessis) in Florida months ago near Ocala. I was glad I actually got to see one.

Frankly, they were a lot more cheaply made than I had expected. I assumed they were much heavier duty than Little Tikes stuff; like the weight of the mounting blocks or jumps that I can't afford. They were not. Also, I had assumed they attached to a base (full=heavy), but they just sit over the top. I have no doubt that my big guy could (thus would) move it around.

I solved my problem by sending one of the boys North, so now my middle stall houses the round bale feeder (they don't go in with it, the sides are closed off, and they have access to the front face).

joharder
Dec. 3, 2008, 04:46 PM
I've used the AGI feeder for about six months now and love it. It's plastic, so when my horses lift their knees to get rid of a fly, they don't bang into a hard metal bar. It keeps the hay in the feeder, so waste is almost nothing.

I put the hay on a wooden palate to keep it off the ground. I use a 10'x10' canopy from Ace Canopy (www.acecanopy.com) over it, so with the exception of a really nasty sideways rain, my hay is dry and horses are happy with the shade.

The downside is that if any rain does get into the inside of the feeder, it gets and stays nasty. It's easy enough to prop the feeder on the side of the wooden palate and comb out the wet hay around the palate from underneath. Let the sun dry it out for an hour or so, and that's it.

It's a lot less work than putting a tarp over a metal hay ring when it rains!

7HL
Dec. 3, 2008, 06:11 PM
USA Link from their site:

http://www.fduplessis.ca/indexUSA.html

pura vide
Dec. 14, 2008, 11:22 PM
Well Asanders - I am guessing you are a blonde if you think you must undo the 20 bolts and nuts that hold the halves together in order to load a bale! You might like to go to this link to see how it really should be done - http://www.palominowarmbloods.com/hay.html and click on the youtube link at the bottom picture.
It will also show why you don't need a heavy base for it.
I regret that your examination of one at Ocala found it to be cheaply made; we have used quite a number of these units in Florida for 8 months and find them to be extremely robust in all respects and not one has been moved by any of our 'big' horses; nor indeed abused in any way. The horses seem to respect them enormously because, after all, they are one of their sources of sustenance. And the hay / money savings are very significant. We have reduced our hay requirement from 150 round bales last year to 110 this year by virtue of the dramatic reduction in wastage. This is a saving of $2450 to us which we are extremely happy with. We estimate one unit feeding one bale per week will more than repay its cost in much less than a year and we expect that these units should last at least 5 to 7 years. They are UV protected and very impact resistant as indeed they should be because the US Army uses identical material for desert storage units.
Nonetheless I have to congratulate you on your innovative solution to your round bale feeding requirements- Hope you're not paying board on the one you shipped north?!

And please - Am I right?

Romany
Dec. 17, 2008, 09:24 PM
We use them, too, with great success.

Duplessis did have some teething problems with the earlier ones, but the newer ones - for all they seem lightweight - are very robust. Our first one developed a crack after a year or so of heavy use, and they replaced it as soon as possible, with many apologies, and didn't charge a nickel.

You do need a tractor with a bale spike to move them around, but if you're using round bales, you've probably got one anyway.

And M Duplessis is the nicest guy to deal with, which is a bonus.

Over the years, I estimate we've recouped most of our purchase price in saved unwasted hay that we used to write off.

pony grandma
Dec. 17, 2008, 10:54 PM
We put our big bales in the back corner of the run in shelters. DH made a two sided surround for them that he ties to the walls and can adjust as the bale gets smaller. It keeps the bale in place and the shelter keeps the bale dry.

Really .... REALLY cheap. :D And 2 birds (3 horses?) with one stone, hay and shelter.

ASB Stars
Dec. 18, 2008, 08:46 AM
Here is a much less expensive version of the duplessis style feeder, manufactured in Missouri:

Bale Bonnet (http://www.coonmfginc.com/products/agricultural.html)

Do you know how much they run- there is no pricing (that I found) on their website.

Cody
Dec. 18, 2008, 06:24 PM
I know exactly what you are talking about. The people that I feed for in DeLeon Springs, he is a dealer for them. They have them in EVERY pasture on the property that they are feeding round bales out of. I watched (opened & shut gates) him this morning put a round bale in a the field. He was able by himself to tip it over, clean up the string, put the new bale in place and then pull the "house" back over on top of the hay roll. If you send me a pm I can give you their contact info. I also saw an ad for them in a FL based magazine Horse & Tack I think.

Cody




I just looked at the post about round bales and realized doh. Someone on this BB will know about this...

In searching for a covered round bale feeder, I found one that was available from a seller in Lancaster PA, and somewhere in Canada. Basically, it looked like a Little Tykes play houseon steroids.

It was square, had a floor, molded ag grade pvc (or cousin) sides --complete with look of crossrail fence that had 2 big 'windows' per side, and a molded roof. It could be opened into two sides (like a giant doll house) to load. You could actually buy singe half to put against a wall.

I think they were around $500 plus ship to FL and I thought 'looks cool, but I'd never order one without talking to someone that has at least seen them'

After looking at the round bale thread, I tried to find the website again, and can't.

Can someone tell me what they were called, and has anybody actually got one?

Elegante E
Dec. 18, 2008, 07:19 PM
I was at a breeding/training farm where they are being used and the owners adore the duplessis feeders. Great for Andalusians as they don't catch or tear out manes. They don't use round bales so just shove in a square bale.

I would like to get one as we have mud problems where I live. Am still awaiting an email response after over a week. Will have to dig up a phone number and call.