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Flypony
Mar. 7, 2008, 11:37 PM
I know all the reasons why. I also know quite a few ways to deal with the problem and still open to more suggestions on how to correct it(the horse is sound)

solargal
Mar. 7, 2008, 11:54 PM
I really like this bit.

http://www.bigdweb.com/detail.aspx?id=5866

I've had better success than a burr.

On some really bad bolters that were sound but had developed the bad habit before, I galloped them in spurs. It was one of those things that you really have to do yourself, so some moron doesn't go out there kicking them. I would ride them around off the track(barn, wherever) and get them used to them and moving off the leg, then go next to a pony on the track and then by themselves. It worked like a charm on all of them. I never had to kick them or even use the spurs once they learned that your legs meant something.

QHJockee
Mar. 8, 2008, 12:55 PM
The solution I've found to work the best is just put my hubby up on them, it's dang sure not pretty to watch but he'll break one of it :D

jengersnap
Mar. 8, 2008, 03:16 PM
One of ours would blow the final turn in the afternoons. Never ever in the mornings, not even in a work. Hubby sent the jockey out in the morning once to work him and he couldn't believe this was the same horse that lugged out in the race on him as he hugged so well then. Can't school out something he only does in a race. Put a run out blinker on him, he's been fine since, and he needs no more then a ring bit. If that didn't work, the next try was going to be a springsteen bit (http://www.bigdweb.com/detail.aspx?id=27909)

Acertainsmile
Mar. 10, 2008, 10:00 PM
I galloped a nice little horse that would only blow the turn in the morning... but never in the afternoon... we put an extension blinker ringbit and noseband on him in the a.m.

In the afternoon he wore 3/4 cups and a d-bit...

We also claimed a horrible bolter...he was a big blockhead kind of a horse, that had terrified just about everyone... after trying to gallop that horse a mile, I went back to the tackroom and pulled out a Belmont Runout bit... that got his attention pronto...

Flypony
Mar. 10, 2008, 11:06 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions, one I don't know is a Belmont run out bit, unless it has another name.

Equus34
Mar. 11, 2008, 08:07 AM
A bit I always recomended to trainers when a horse would lug in or out and alsway had great results with is the Haughton bit. It's similar to the one that Solargal posted, except with out the extensions. Also Most Jockeys including myself like them, as they are great for steering, but not so much for breaks LOL.

Acertainsmile
Mar. 11, 2008, 09:58 AM
As far as the bit I posted, it is extreme, I've only needed it twice... and used it sparingly... we had a young horse that thought it would be fun to try to jump the inside fence at random...and that bullheaded horse we claimed...LOL.

I'll try to post a link, and you can scroll down to view the bit... also...it is only as harsh as you make it...the horses I used it on didnt have a mark on them afterwards.



Go to page 140-141

http://books.google.com/books?id=i_iN_eyz0NMC&pg=PA140&lpg=PA140&dq=slide+bit+prongs+horse&source=web&ots=vjdYFlawBT&sig=npMxORN-4Ydi9v5gmCTtIf4IA1A&hl=en#PPA141,M1

jengersnap
Mar. 11, 2008, 01:07 PM
I'll try to post a link, and you can scroll down to view the bit... also...it is only as harsh as you make it...the horses I used it on didnt have a mark on them afterwards.

Go to page 140-141


I can't get google to open the book for me, but from the search terms of "slide bit prong" I have a feeling it's what my husband was looking for when ours was lugging out as a next step. He had one made when he was at philly. Effective reprograming tool, does need someone familiar with it to use one.

Acertainsmile
Mar. 11, 2008, 07:54 PM
Yes, it is the prong bit... a little pressure goes a long way... it can be turned either way, so that it can be used for a horse that lugs in or out.

I actually saw one in the tack trailer at Charlestown a few years ago!

Laurierace
Mar. 11, 2008, 08:55 PM
Yes, it is the prong bit... a little pressure goes a long way... it can be turned either way, so that it can be used for a horse that lugs in or out.

I actually saw one in the tack trailer at Charlestown a few years ago!

I have a bit that I was always told was called a cage bit, I wonder if that is the same thing. It is smooth until the jock pulls out on that rein and then 6 or so spikes come out and push into the cheek. I haven't used it many times, but it has been 100% effective in my experience. The only thing you really have to worry about is 1. the jock knows how to use it and 2. the jock doesn't take one look at your horse in that bit and refuse to ride. Lots of them are scared of it as they are sure they are going through the fence.

Acertainsmile
Mar. 12, 2008, 09:06 AM
Laurie, yes, a cage bit is the same thing... thats what I always called it untill I looked up the technical name! :) We never ran a horse in it though...I agree that it may scare the jocks... some of them have enough to worry about, even when there is nothing to worry about!

Pat Ness
Mar. 12, 2008, 01:13 PM
My filly was fine until she had enough of the rider that would not let go of her mouth. As luck has it - the problem started right before her first race so she blew the turn in her race -got put on the stewards list.
Luckily, an excellent horseman started riding her that let go of her mouth and steered without pulling and her problem went away, unless you put a rider on her that pulls.
Just another thought.

Flypony
Mar. 12, 2008, 03:10 PM
My filly was fine until she had enough of the rider that would not let go of her mouth. As luck has it - the problem started right before her first race so she blew the turn in her race -got put on the stewards list.
Luckily, an excellent horseman started riding her that let go of her mouth and steered without pulling and her problem went away, unless you put a rider on her that pulls.
Just another thought.Your bang on, but try and convince a rider to drop thier face when they are running wide, my gallop boy and myself have no problem with him, He's 3 and goes for the okay tommorow, he will wear a burr.

Acertainsmile
Mar. 12, 2008, 11:14 PM
Usually it is rider error... I agree, hard to tell someone to give them their heads going into the turn, especially if they are known to blow them... usually the horse can feel the rider tense, and then it becomes a "fun" game.

Flypony
Mar. 13, 2008, 02:52 PM
Well he worked 5F in a bullet, ran just a touch wide, and gained himself the services of the leading rider.

Pat Ness
Mar. 13, 2008, 03:25 PM
Great! That is wonderful news!

Acertainsmile
Mar. 14, 2008, 08:54 AM
Well he worked 5F in a bullet, ran just a touch wide, and gained himself the services of the leading rider.


Great to hear, I'm sure thats a huge relief to you!
Wondering what equipment you used?

Flypony
Mar. 14, 2008, 02:58 PM
He went in a loose ring snaffle , with a Serena Song mouth piece, a winalot and a burr on the right side. We run on a 5/8 th's bull ring here , and he is bred like and acts like a route horse ....so he'd better get used to turns:)