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moonriverfarm
Feb. 11, 2008, 03:31 PM
I just got an OTTB who came to me back-sore. Very.
I love homeopathy and will use it on him, but do any of you "real" racing folks have suggestions (other than time off of course) to help him? The chiro adjusted him, and all is in place.

Simkie
Feb. 11, 2008, 03:43 PM
I'm not a real racing folk, but I do have a OTTB who gets sore sometimes. Handwalking helps her SO much. She'll go from "DO NOT TOUCH ME" sore (where she'll drop nearly to the ground if you run your hands down her back) to not sore AT ALL in a day or two if I take her out and hand walk her around the fields. Longeing her at the walk or riding her at the walk does not create the same relief. Ponying her at the walk may, but I don't have a pony horse.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 11, 2008, 04:25 PM
This horse has been with me on full turnout for a month now. We have backed him three times and he is still sore. He hops into a canter and won't, or can't, hold a trot. Farrier coming tomorrow to rule that out. I have him on Arnica twice a day, and it has helped.

johnnysauntie
Feb. 11, 2008, 04:28 PM
I have an OTTB of my own who was sore all over, and I volunteer at an OTTB charity, where we see this freqently.

I started riding my guy in September, and purchased him a month ago. He was sore all over when he arrived at Wood End in April. We started slowly with him - groundwork, then lots of w/t under saddle. In the last two weeks - FINALLY - he's started using his back really well - stretching down beautifully on the longe, rounding under saddle. Over the last few months, I addressed a variety of issues with him - including farrier work, dental (had some big issues there) and saddle fit. In addition to buying a new saddle that is much more comforable for him, I've also been using a Thinline.

We're still primarily working on w/t and balance (though we are doing canter transitions on the longe). He's doing so well, and seeing/feeling him engage that back is wonderful. So I'd say take it slow, and check all the variables, you may either pinpoint (or wind up correcting) the issue. But as that topline builds, things will improve.

Good luck!

chism
Feb. 11, 2008, 04:36 PM
If he was mine, I would have a massage therapist and chiro look at him. That's always been part of my rehab for the off the track horses, they all seem to come with some body soreness. It also helps ensure that you won't be getting any pain related launchings. ;)

Acertainsmile
Feb. 11, 2008, 05:32 PM
I would have your vet go over his hocks and stifles... also test for Lymes. A round of Robaxin might also help loosen things up.

Simkie
Feb. 11, 2008, 05:44 PM
This horse has been with me on full turnout for a month now. We have backed him three times and he is still sore. He hops into a canter and won't, or can't, hold a trot. Farrier coming tomorrow to rule that out. I have him on Arnica twice a day, and it has helped.

:confused: Are you saying turnout = handwalking? Because turnout doesn't do a damn thing for my mare where she's sore. Handwalking makes all the difference. It's an easy thing to try.

elmerandharriet
Feb. 11, 2008, 07:03 PM
i would get a chiro out. i read somewhere that you should get ottb adjusted once they come off the track. bits and bite farm has a nice thing on their website about ottb and the chiro

mht
Feb. 11, 2008, 07:52 PM
When you got the horse, was he shod, and you took them off right away? We had a mystery lameness/back problem with an OTTB. Brought him home, pulled his shoes, and about a week later-lame! The next time the farrier was out he asked to see his old shoes. Turns out he had been wearing wedges, and as soon as we pulled the shoes, he was out of whack. We never did re shoe him, but the farrier adjusted how he trimmed to make him comfy.

minnie
Feb. 11, 2008, 07:58 PM
I second the robaxin and massage. The robaxin will give a jump start to relaxing the muscles. Once they're sore and tight, the pain makes them tense up and get more sore and tight, so it can be a vicious cycle.

Laurierace
Feb. 11, 2008, 08:02 PM
I have yet to run across a sore back that originated in the back. It is either feet or hocks or both most of the time. If you don't fix the original problem, nothing you do to the back is going to last.

rcloisonne
Feb. 12, 2008, 04:30 AM
I have yet to run across a sore back that originated in the back. It is either feet or hocks or both most of the time. If you don't fix the original problem, nothing you do to the back is going to last.
^^^^^^^^^^
:yes: :yes: :yes: :yes:

More than a few OTTBs have deplorable feet (long toes with crushed, under run heels, flat soles) and quite often negative plane coffin bones as well, especially in the rear. Chiro and massage ain't gonna fix that.

LKF
Feb. 12, 2008, 07:09 AM
I just got an OTTB who came to me back-sore. Very.
I love homeopathy and will use it on him, but do any of you "real" racing folks have suggestions (other than time off of course) to help him? The chiro adjusted him, and all is in place.

Along with the Chiropractor, use the massage and heat. The heat source can be hot towel packs. Also check out a company called BACK ON TRACK. They've a web site and it explains about their equine body products and they've a lot of testimonials (Michael Matz, Gary Stevens).

I also use a hand held back massager. They at first aren't too sure of it, but after a few minutes start to relax.

I usually give them a few days off after the Chiro, Massages and heat. I follow up with long walks too. I've found that they can become sore from the treatments (just like people). Trainers need to be more aware of lactic acid after hard work outs and races.

Toadie's mom
Feb. 12, 2008, 10:42 AM
I have yet to run across a sore back that originated in the back. It is either feet or hocks or both most of the time. If you don't fix the original problem, nothing you do to the back is going to last.

Here, here, or is it HEAR HEAR! I'd say 8 times out of ten the sore back is a result of soreness somewhere else and usually it's hocks, or stifles. I had one that we injected hocks, stifles, and all 4 ankles. He was never "girthy", but pinned his ears, bit and kicked, just when you sat the saddle on him. He also was reluctant to move forward (that is, compared to most TBs). Before the injections, I had chiropractor and massage work done and no noticeable improvement. After the injections he improved tremendously. I also put them all on a joint supplement, whether I think they need it, or not.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 13, 2008, 02:26 PM
Thanks for all the input. He moves GREAt in the pasture and on the longe. It's under saddle (we have tried several) that hs seems sore. He had had his shoes pulled when I got him. He's probably the 20th one I've gotten and the only one with this kind of soreness. He moves around with the herd all day, but I will try handwalking also.

Simkie
Feb. 13, 2008, 03:16 PM
Your latest post reminded me: Blush got pretty back sore when I first brought her back into work after surgery. Shoeing her behind (she was already shod up front) made her comfortable within a day or so. Just one more thing to consider.

Good luck!

tradewind
Feb. 13, 2008, 06:31 PM
This may sound silly, but perhaps a good saddle fitter should come look at how your saddle is fitting him..

Spark
Feb. 13, 2008, 08:06 PM
Consider using a back on track blanket. I have back on track no-bows for the filling in my horse's legs and they work very well. I have never tried the blankets, but the logic behind them makes sense to me. They increase blood flow and circulation and heat. Google back on track to take a look.

ryansgirl
Feb. 13, 2008, 09:23 PM
My OTTB was also very back sore - I had a full lameness exam done on her (though she has never been lame in the almost five years I've had her) and it turned out she has Kissing Spines :cry:. The films clearly showed the problem - of course all her other films were clean - how often does that happen for an OTTB - absolutely clean legs :yes:.

She's now my permanent pasture pet and loving it :D:).