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View Full Version : Endurance riders who event--or have thought about it? Would you clinic?



pwynnnorman
Jan. 20, 2008, 07:13 AM
There's a thread on the eventers' BB announcing this clinic (http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?p=2949761#post2949761), the goal of which is to introduce folks to the sport. It's kind of a trial balloon to see if there's any demand (and to discover how best to offer the education).

Whether you are interested or not, what is your impression of this effort? Are there many "crossover" riders or much "cross-training" between sports when it comes to endurance? Or does the sport of endurance use a different set of muscles or require too much in and of itself for there to be any consideration of other pursuits? Is the jumping requirement of eventing an issue? Or is the need to be able to pop over logs and stuff on the trail make that not as much an issue (since eventing at the lowest levels involves little more than you'd encounter on the trail)?

Just curious!

Auventera Two
Jan. 20, 2008, 09:36 AM
Almost every endurance rider I know or have talked to does some other discipline as well, though mostly what I've heard about is dressage, hunters, or different stuff like parades, long camping trips, or mounted rescue.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jan. 20, 2008, 10:04 AM
eventing at the lowest levels involves little more than you'd encounter on the trail

????

You must have some bodacious trails where you're from.

CookiePony
Jan. 20, 2008, 11:02 AM
Here is the text from the official announcement:


Intro to Eventing Clinic
endorsed by the US Eventing Association

Hosted by:
Upper Level 3 Day Eventer

Mary Bess Sigman of Triple Creek Eventing
and
Dressage trainer – Kristin Reid of Royal Salute Farm

Open to all disciplines(except current eventers)
Come spend the day experiencing the basics of eventing!
*each group will be tailored to riding ability and goals*

Session 1: Gridwork – learn the basics of gymnastics and work on position.

Session 2: Cross Country – learn to trot and canter up and down hills, jump solid objects and ride more independently.

Session 3: Dressage – learn the basics of the dressage “test” and how to get your horse on the bit and moving off of your leg.

Each session: $40 (can do one, two or all three)
Venue/insurance fee: $20
If you do all three sessions - save $10 – will be $130.00
*we will have snacks and drinks*

Join us for a trail ride after the clinic!

Date: Saturday February 23, 2008
Time: 10:00am groups will start – we will give more detail as groups sign up.

Location: Triple Creek Farm – Covington, GA (1 hour,15 minutes from Atlanta)

Please respond to India Watson – 404-394-7950 cell or
e-mail – indiawatson@comcast.net
We have limited space for participants - come have some fun and
“Think Outside the Ring!”

Re trails with jumps... up in MA when I was a kid, we did have some trails that had some wonderful jumps... many of those are now housing developments. But I recall jumping many little coops bareback with a halter and lead rope... of course, those were my young and brave days...

saratoga
Jan. 20, 2008, 11:04 AM
I love both endurance and eventing- evented up to training with my TB several years back and its my goal to do a BN event with my 14.1 hand Ay-rab in 2009 :)

But IMO, endurance people are not interested in jumping at all, actually scared to jump, most of them. Plus they mostly have Arabs, which are not known for excelling in the sport.

pandorasboxx
Jan. 20, 2008, 12:46 PM
I wouldn't mind checking it out if it was close by.

I 've started taking dressage lessons once and week and while it is beneficial to my riding and the horse's carriage, I find it abjectly BORING. I can barely bring myself to do it 1x a week much less compete in it. And the horse definitely doesn't think too much of it either. If I could only do cross country then that would be more appealing.

Jumping small things like downed trees and small ditches has been the extent of our jumping experience. I would like to do more but am not balanced or knowledgeable enough to do anything larger. Plus, I'm worried about an injury that would take us out of endurance.

Ring jumping not so interesting but cross country? That looks like a blast!

I did the Foxcatcher 50 last May at Fairhills and yearned to go over some of those small jumps we passed. Didn't want to attempt them in case of injury took us out of the race but it did look so fun.

Next year we're going to try foxhunting.

pwynnnorman
Jan. 21, 2008, 08:20 AM
But IMO, endurance people are not interested in jumping at all, actually scared to jump, most of them. Plus they mostly have Arabs, which are not known for excelling in the sport.

Not known only because they don't get much press. Lot's of 'em out there, although mainly at the lower levels. Tamarillo, one of the best eventers in the world, is an Anglo-Arab.

In fact, it's a bit interesting to me, the Arab thing. I watch a lot of eventing videotapes and I notice how, the higher up the levels you go, the more the horses tend to jump...well, more like a lot of Arabs do: a bit more head-up, fold up the landing gear, land super-fast and going on. And with that kind of jump and lightness, I think the Arab blood also adds quite a bit of speed, too. A lot of the warmbloods you see these days have to be set up going down to the jumps (which takes time) and then waste a lot more time in the air, cracking their backs and looking down. Then they land hard and have to be pushed on.

Anyway, seems to me that if a touch of Arab can add some good stuff, a lot of Arab must be quite capable!

Auventera Two
Jan. 21, 2008, 09:39 AM
There are some nice Arab jumpers, but a lot of them do the "deer jump" and I can't help but think that's got to be hard on their bodies with that much hollowness. If your Arab uses himself nicely and is a good little jumper, then use it for cross training. I'm going to approach jumping very cautiously with my Arab.

In most picture of Arabs jumping there is no bascule, inverted, high headed, hind end trailing. To much of this http://www.arabs-iowa.com/Tuxi--jump--lungeline3.JPG just can't be good.

Arabians are my favorite breed and I will always own at least one, but there's a reason they aren't better known in the jumper world. There's some really nice ones out there, but if your Arab can't do it properly, I would rather not do it at all than risk damage to the skeletal system in the name of cross training.

saratoga
Jan. 21, 2008, 10:16 AM
Not known only because they don't get much press. Lot's of 'em out there, although mainly at the lower levels. Tamarillo, one of the best eventers in the world, is an Anglo-Arab.

In fact, it's a bit interesting to me, the Arab thing. I watch a lot of eventing videotapes and I notice how, the higher up the levels you go, the more the horses tend to jump...well, more like a lot of Arabs do: a bit more head-up, fold up the landing gear, land super-fast and going on. And with that kind of jump and lightness, I think the Arab blood also adds quite a bit of speed, too. A lot of the warmbloods you see these days have to be set up going down to the jumps (which takes time) and then waste a lot more time in the air, cracking their backs and looking down. Then they land hard and have to be pushed on.

Anyway, seems to me that if a touch of Arab can add some good stuff, a lot of Arab must be quite capable!

I'll keep re-reading this!! I want to get back into eventing, this time with my 14.1 Arab mare. She is doing x-rails in the arena now and stuff on the trail up to about 2'3". Shes actually doing really well and thankfully bolder than my Arab gelding is and some other Arabs I know. the goal is to do BN next year!! I *think* she actually has quite nice form for the most part.

sunhawk
Jan. 21, 2008, 12:44 PM
I like taking the eventers on LD's. I think it's great cross-training. It's relatively low entry fee, and it's nice to be able to check on your conditioning with vets in place, not to mention it's a cheap health check for a competition horse, compared to bringing a vet to your place. I especially like the idea of travelling to places to ride trails I've never been on. I don't really care whether I finish or place, since for me the sport is purely recreational. I do plan on trying a 50 this year with my training level ottb.

Dalriada
Jan. 23, 2008, 03:18 PM
I've done low level eventing in my past when I was a Pony Clubber but those solid jumps just scare the heck out of me.

Nowadays I stick with showring hunters and jumpers for my distance horses and popping over the logs and trees down on the trail.

My distance horses show (mainring round in circles as well as the working disciplines like combined driving, hunter and jumper) and my show horses distance ride - keeps us all fresh and refreshed.

Dalriada
Jan. 23, 2008, 03:21 PM
I've done low level eventing in my past when I was a Pony Clubber but those solid jumps just scare the heck out of me.

Nowadays I stick with showring hunters and jumpers for my distance horses and popping over the logs and trees down on the trail.

My distance horses show (mainring round in circles as well as the working disciplines like combined driving, hunter and jumper) and my show horses distance ride - keeps us all fresh and refreshed.