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jme
Jan. 8, 2008, 03:10 PM
I need to know the pros and cons of rope girths. I've never used one. I am considering trying one for a horse who does not have much clearance behind the elbows. He's a little horse altogether, actually.

For the record, we've tried the nice shaped girths and even a County Logic. For varying reasons I'm only mildly happy with those types.

Oh, I'm posting this here because this horse is in dressage work and I'm riding in a Kieffer- long billets.

Thanks. :)

Alagirl
Jan. 8, 2008, 03:15 PM
hmmm, used to be all we had. I am either that old or always behind the times.


There is not too much to say about them, every once in a while they need washing, either scrubbed by hand or with wrapped up buckles in the washing machine.

White ones turn gray over time....

I like them, they are simple, breathable and economical.

Blkarab
Jan. 8, 2008, 04:03 PM
I love my rope girth! I had tried everything with my very touchy mare, including the top of the line contoured, padded leather.

My only word of caution is to make sure that the girth is long enough for the buckles to be resting on the flap of the saddle so that they don't bruise the sides of the horse. With long billets, that shouldn't be too much of a problem, you may have to punch holes in your billets to get the girth high enough. Otherwise they are great! You can even find them with keepers.:)

Blkarab

angel
Jan. 8, 2008, 04:28 PM
I use a string girth all the time because it fits better. The biggest problem you will have is finding one short enough to use with the long billets of a dressage saddle, and that will also be short enough to fit your small horse.

craz4crtrs
Jan. 8, 2008, 04:48 PM
Montana cincha makes custom mohair girths, both dressage or long length, plus of course western.

I bought mine through Saddle Up Tack. I have a Cushings arab gelding that is so tender skinned, he galls even with a merino cover. The mohair has been a lifesaver for us. I wouldn's use cotton or nylon string girths though, just mohair or mohair blend.

marta
Jan. 8, 2008, 05:49 PM
if you go to any of the dealers of endurance tack you'll be able to get the short ones for long billets.

i'm looking for an ap mohair girth for my new saddle. just posted a question on the endurance forum asking whether any one manufacturer is better than others.

i've read that the string girths are less likely to shift forward and that they have more 'give' to them (especially mohair).

Portia
Jan. 8, 2008, 05:53 PM
I like the trevira cord string girths for our hot, humid climate here. Never had a problem with chafing or apparent discomfort. (Trevira is a soft but strong man-made material.) Dressage Extensions has short trevira cord string girths, but check with them because the description says they have billet strap keepers but the last short one I ordered came without any kind of keepers while the one I ordered prior to that did have the keepers. (The longer ones I've ordered from them have all had the keepers.) They may come from different suppliers. But at $20, it's more than worth giving it a try.

http://www.dressageextensions.com/ProductDetail.asp?KEY=2752

tollertwins
Jan. 8, 2008, 08:34 PM
i just ordered a mohair one by montana cincha....

little guy has a forward girth groove but doesn't have enough room for the shaped girths to not pinch...

Hampton Bay
Jan. 8, 2008, 11:28 PM
I use them with my jumping saddle and LOVE them. I will never use anything else for a long girth (don't like how they look for dressage).

I have mohair ones too, and have never had one rub. They hold up very well, are cheap, and you can throw them in the washing machine (but do tie up the buckles).

hillary again
Jan. 8, 2008, 11:50 PM
I love mine also - use with my jumping saddle. It's Trevira (which is a trademark for a branded nylon fiber). I've had it for years. I put in the washing machine in a laundry bag, like for delicates. Much cooler for the horse.
Be careful with your spurs: you can get them caught in the strings.

jme
Jan. 9, 2008, 12:19 AM
Be careful with your spurs: you can get them caught in the strings.

That would Not be good. :o

If you have a gray horse is it more proper to clad him in a white or black string girth for dressage?

I'm surprised at the happy string girth users. It's great! I got a few strange looks when I mentioned it to some horsey friends the other day. Maybe they were thinking it's a fashion faux pas?

Portia
Jan. 9, 2008, 01:57 PM
I think the white looks better on a grey than the black does -- makes them look slimmer, you know. ;)

I don't know about which is "proper" for dressage, but we use a white trevira string girth on my grey mare for the jumpers. It matches the white saddle pad and and her coat and so just blends into the background. The only problem is my trainer has decided she likes the look of the matching girth and saddle pad, so she still uses the white one on my bay gelding in the jumpers.

OnCue
Jan. 9, 2008, 02:05 PM
Dressage Extensions has short trevira cord string girths, but check with them because the description says they have billet strap keepers but the last short one I ordered came without any kind of keepers while the one I ordered prior to that did have the keepers. (The longer ones I've ordered from them have all had the keepers.) They may come from different suppliers. But at $20, it's more than worth giving it a try.

http://www.dressageextensions.com/ProductDetail.asp?KEY=2752

I had the exact same experience, but as of 2 weeks ago, they had the billet keeper ones in stock. If you do a phone order, they're happy to confirm it with you. Also, horseloverz.com has the same girth for a similar price.

The ones from Montana Cincha are fantastic, but be very careful washing them as the shrinkage is pretty extreme.

Auventera Two
Jan. 9, 2008, 02:51 PM
Geuine, 100% mohair girths seem to be popular with endurance riders. I have a Montana Cincha black/white striped short one. I've read about both shrinking when washing and stretching with use on real mohair girths, but I haven't had mine long enough to know yet. The manufacturer recommends a high quality wool detergent, hand washing in cold water, and laying flat to dry. You can buy them at most of the distance riding tack shops like Running Bear, Saddle Up, Action Rider, Long Riders Gear, The Distance Depot, etc. For links to all of these go to the home page of www.endurance.net (http://www.endurance.net).

A good mohair girth will start around $60-70 and on up. The cheap $20 ones are made of rayon, nylon, or some other type of polyester. I'm not sure if some horses would gall with those synthetic fibers or not?? I didn't want to chance it.

A quality mohair girth will have buckle protectors made of leather, neoprene, or a combo of both. The cheap girths don't have protectors and the horse can get sore from the buckles. The expensive ones definitely have keepers too.

Alagirl
Jan. 9, 2008, 11:07 PM
I love mine also - use with my jumping saddle. It's Trevira (which is a trademark for a branded nylon fiber). I've had it for years. I put in the washing machine in a laundry bag, like for delicates. Much cooler for the horse.
Be careful with your spurs: you can get them caught in the strings.



LOL, you should with normal foot position not get into that predicament...on the other hand, I have heard trainers tell a student to give a horse a poke through the string girth with the spurs...since it is the most sensible area on the side...