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View Full Version : Having fun with my endurance horse in the snow - PICS!



Auventera Two
Dec. 25, 2007, 06:05 PM
After 10 fresh new inches of snow, I thought I'd try out a new "sport!" :lol: This is the first time she's ever pulled anything - especially an intertube! She's young and green, but what a good girl. She didn't protest, and genuinely ENJOYED herself! She loves to get out and do things. :) What a sweetheart!

I wasn't brave enough to canter, but we did trot a little bit. She ground drives very well, and of course I took time to accustom her to the tube scooting along behind before I hooked her up to it and got on. But as is her typical fashion, she handled it A++, and made me proud. :D (this is the advantage to raising your own baby! you accustom them to all sorts of stuff when they're BABIES. hehehe. It makes your job MUCH easier later on)

ChocoMare
Dec. 25, 2007, 06:33 PM
What a riot! :winkgrin:

jazzrider
Dec. 25, 2007, 07:04 PM
How fun is that? Super pics! :yes: I better not show my hubby, otherwise next time it snows here in VA he'll be hooking up our horses! :lol:

I wish we had a white Christmas here -- it was sunny and almost 50 degrees today.

Merry Christmas!

tpup
Dec. 25, 2007, 07:58 PM
That looks like so much fun!! What a pretty horse you have. Thanks for sharing! :)

grayarabpony
Dec. 25, 2007, 08:01 PM
Looks like fun. How fast did you go?

Chief2
Dec. 26, 2007, 01:44 AM
Oh, looks like so much fun! I wanted to do this on my x-c skis with my first horse, but since he had more go than whoa, the idea was vetoed at home. It looks like you had a great time!

winona
Dec. 26, 2007, 12:08 PM
cool!!!! I have wanted to do that with my mini who drives. Seems like when we have snow and a day off....it is way too cold (for my kids).

Huntertwo
Dec. 26, 2007, 03:37 PM
What a neat idea! You have a wonderful horse there A2. :)

Jennifer Alcott
Dec. 26, 2007, 09:25 PM
AWESOME!!!

Reminds me of the crazy things we subjected our saint of a Morgan to when I was a kid...we lived in the Connecticut and Massachusetts (the Berkshires) in the 70's, and I can remember saddling up Bilbo (our wonderful Morgan gelding) and then taking a rope and tying a toboggan to the saddle horn. One person would ride the horse, and the rest of us would sit on the toboggan and enjoy the wild ride. And of course, in a pinch, if you couldn't find a rope, you just sat on the toboggan and hung onto poor Bilbo's tail! Fortunately, his tail was long enough (being a Morgan, and all!) that his hooves just missed the toboggan when we were hanging onto his tail.

But that seemed rather safe and tame compared to the times that my father would tie to toboggan to the bumper of the family car, and tow all four of us kids ON THE SNOW COVERED ROADS!!!! When he'd see an oncoming car, he'd honk the horn, which was our signal to jump off on the ditch side of the road, and he'd stop the car. Once the oncoming car had passed us, we'd get back on the toboggan, and away we'd go again!

Those were the days before helmets, safety consciousness, and child endangerment laws! :)

My mother, my sisters, my brother, and I often talk about how we're amazed that we all actually survived our childhood.

Auventera Two
Dec. 26, 2007, 09:34 PM
Jennifer - what wonderful stories!! :lol: You're right, it's amazing any of us survived our childhood! :D :lol:

citydog
Dec. 26, 2007, 09:38 PM
Oh man that looks like fun.

Might need to dig out the long lines...

prudence
Dec. 27, 2007, 09:11 AM
Wow, can't believe you ride/drive in the snow! The toboggan behind the truck sounds absolutely thrilling. When I was little, we used to ride in the back of my dad's pickup, standing up and holding on with our fingers in the little groove on top of the cab on the freeway. I always told my dad nice try (in trying to get rid of us!).

Another snow video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNo7BGf0Gp8&feature=related

Huntertwo
Dec. 27, 2007, 09:12 PM
AWESOME!!!

Reminds me of the crazy things we subjected our saint of a Morgan to when I was a kid...we lived in the Connecticut and Massachusetts (the Berkshires) in the 70's, and I can remember saddling up Bilbo (our wonderful Morgan gelding) and then taking a rope and tying a toboggan to the saddle horn. One person would ride the horse, and the rest of us would sit on the toboggan and enjoy the wild ride. And of course, in a pinch, if you couldn't find a rope, you just sat on the toboggan and hung onto poor Bilbo's tail! Fortunately, his tail was long enough (being a Morgan, and all!) that his hooves just missed the toboggan when we were hanging onto his tail.

But that seemed rather safe and tame compared to the times that my father would tie to toboggan to the bumper of the family car, and tow all four of us kids ON THE SNOW COVERED ROADS!!!! When he'd see an oncoming car, he'd honk the horn, which was our signal to jump off on the ditch side of the road, and he'd stop the car. Once the oncoming car had passed us, we'd get back on the toboggan, and away we'd go again!

Those were the days before helmets, safety consciousness, and child endangerment laws! :)

My mother, my sisters, my brother, and I often talk about how we're amazed that we all actually survived our childhood.

When we were young we lived on a dead end. (Now they call them Cul-de-sacs) ;)
So we were usually one of the last roads to get plowed.

Anyway, my older brother, (who was always trying to kill me anyway:))
had a Camaro and we used to do bumper skiing.

We'd hang on to the back bumper with just our winter boots on as he'd do "Donuts" around the dead end. Ah, to be young again. :yes:

Edited to add: Since I have been misquoted on TMP, It wasn't my parents towing me around behind their "pickup truck".

kmw2707
Dec. 28, 2007, 12:26 PM
Great Pics AT! Brings back fond memories from childhood for me too!

Fiat Lux
Dec. 30, 2007, 11:11 AM
Very cool! Looks like fun! I would love to try skijoring, but I haven't been able to convince either of my brothers to ski behind my horse yet!

kansasgal
Dec. 30, 2007, 05:38 PM
Thanks for sharing.
Great pictures, and I love all that pink.

Jennifer Alcott- Bilbo must have been a saint, great stories . Bless his soul.

Yes, that looks like one way to put the fun back into winter with horses.

We had a white Christmas here in Kansas, which is pretty rare.
Yesterday, I drove by a snow covered (sports) playing field, and saw a guy on skis holding a small parachute. There was just enough wind that he was being pulled along at a nice clip. So many possibilities for fun in the snow!

Best wishes for a safe and happy new year.

Thomas_1
Dec. 31, 2007, 02:12 PM
I notice you don't have a collar on. I also notice you have no trace carriers.

How did you attach the traces?

How did you prevent the mare pulling you from her mouth and the reins?

When you made your turn how did you stop the traces getting caught round her legs?

When she transitioned down from trot how did you prevent the tire going forward and into her?

Why do you put a numnah (saddlecloth)under her surcingle (you might call it a lunge roller?)? Or is it a driving saddle?? (difficult to see in the photo)

I thought you didn't like bits in horses. Do you always use one now? And are you always using a riding bit for driving and longlining etc? How do you compensate for the extra length of leverage?

pandorasboxx
Dec. 31, 2007, 02:29 PM
Now that looks like fun!

Makes me wish it would snow here.....

marta
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:15 PM
I notice you don't have a collar on. I also notice you have no trace carriers.

How did you attach the traces?

How did you prevent the mare pulling you from her mouth and the reins?

When you made your turn how did you stop the traces getting caught round her legs?

When she transitioned down from trot how did you prevent the tire going forward and into her?




i'm still waiting for snow here in jersey however i've been hoping to try my version of ski joring with my mare. we've been ground driving for a little over a month now (under trainer's supervision). we were going to try the harness next. however, i thought that i could try ski joring (having her pull my on my x country skis behind her) by using a surcingle and a breast collar with the pulling lines (probably yaht rope) attached to the surcingle rings and then using my ground driving lines as i normally would while ground driving. so there would be no pressure on her mouth other than maybe when i'd ask her for a downward transition or a stop.
i realize this is not a proper way to 'drive' but do you see anything inherently wrong with that set up? i mean anything that will be harmful to the horse? someone else here posted photos of her ski joring that way and it just looked so awesome. and yes, my mare is a saint and would have no objection to doing this even if i were holding to her tail, so that's not a concern. i just don't want to hurt her.

Auventera Two
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:19 PM
Now that looks like fun!

Makes me wish it would snow here.....

The scenery here today is absolutely beautiful. We got a "freezing fog" which I've never heard of before but the trees look like they've been sprayed with that fake snow they put in department store windows. Just gorgeous! Winter is beautiful in the North. :)

We're doing a ride tomorrow at a christmas tree farm and I can't wait to get out there in the deep woods. There's just nothing like it.

Auventera Two
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:24 PM
i'm still waiting for snow here in jersey however i've been hoping to try my version of ski joring with my mare. we've been ground driving for a little over a month now (under trainer's supervision). we were going to try the harness next. however, i thought that i could try ski joring (having her pull my on my x country skis behind her) by using a surcingle and a breast collar with the pulling lines (probably yaht rope) attached to the surcingle rings and then using my ground driving lines as i normally would while ground driving. so there would be no pressure on her mouth other than maybe when i'd ask her for a downward transition or a stop.
i realize this is not a proper way to 'drive' but do you see anything inherently wrong with that set up? i mean anything that will be harmful to the horse? someone else here posted photos of her ski joring that way and it just looked so awesome. and yes, my mare is a saint and would have no objection to doing this even if i were holding to her tail, so that's not a concern. i just don't want to hurt her.

That's pretty much what I do marta. She pulls from the lines attached to the surcingle and breastcollar. Driving lines are separate, just like normal.

Get out there and have some fun with your horse! Life is too short to sit inside depressed about the winter, right? :D

Thomas_1
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:30 PM
Is that what you call a breast collar??

It looks to me like its just a hunting breast plate to stop the saddle slipping back. Not for using in draft is it?

I think you might have them on western saddles too though I thought they were called breast straps??

Driving breast collars are as per here:

http://www.plasequestrian.co.uk/harness.htm

marta
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:34 PM
come man, no one is going to spend $ on a real driving collar unless they plan to make it a career;) this is just some silly fun in the snow (hence the snow tube;)).

Thomas_1
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:41 PM
come man, no one is going to spend $ on a real driving collar unless they plan to make it a career;) this is just some silly fun in the snow (hence the snow tube;)).

And because I could see it wasn't a driving collar that's why I asked the following:

I notice you don't have a collar on. I also notice you have no trace carriers.

How did you attach the traces?

How did you prevent the mare pulling you from her mouth and the reins?

When you made your turn how did you stop the traces getting caught round her legs?

When she transitioned down from trot how did you prevent the tire going forward and into her?

Why do you put a numnah (saddlecloth)under her surcingle (you might call it a lunge roller?)? Or is it a driving saddle?? (difficult to see in the photo)

I thought you didn't like bits in horses. Do you always use one now? And are you always using a riding bit for driving and longlining etc? How do you compensate for the extra length of leverage?

Or doesn't safety for the horse matter when its snowing???

Auventera Two
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:46 PM
come man, no one is going to spend $ on a real driving collar unless they plan to make it a career;) this is just some silly fun in the snow (hence the snow tube;)).

Just ignore him marta. He has a habit of thread crashing and starting fights. I can't read his garbage because he's on the ignore list. So stop quoting him. :D :lol:

I wanted to get out in the snow to do some playing yesterday but we've been rewiring the barn for 2 days. It's all finished though finally, yay! That was a job a long time coming. Such a relief. I can't wait to get on a horse tomorrow. Winter riding is just wonderful.

Rodeio
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:48 PM
come man, no one is going to spend $ on a real driving collar unless they plan to make it a career;) this is just some silly fun in the snow (hence the snow tube;)).

And using ill fitting equipment, wrong equipment or just plain jerry rigged equipment can get people seriously injured.

Ja Da Dee
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:52 PM
When you made your turn how did you stop the traces getting caught round her legs?

When she transitioned down from trot how did you prevent the tire going forward and into her?

I was wondering these same things. It looks like you had fun, thankfully neither of you got hurt.

Thomas_1
Dec. 31, 2007, 03:53 PM
And using ill fitting equipment, wrong equipment or just plain jerry rigged equipment can get people seriously injured.


She's young and green, And taking advantage of the good and forgiving nature of young and green horses never gets accolade from me. Its just Too Stupid!

goeslikestink
Dec. 31, 2007, 06:14 PM
Just ignore him marta. He has a habit of thread crashing and starting fights. I can't read his garbage because he's on the ignore list. So stop quoting him. :D :lol:

I wanted to get out in the snow to do some playing yesterday but we've been rewiring the barn for 2 days. It's all finished though finally, yay! That was a job a long time coming. Such a relief. I can't wait to get on a horse tomorrow. Winter riding is just wonderful.


you do that often gate crash as you say

obviously you have no concern for your horse at all--

cinder88
Dec. 31, 2007, 06:28 PM
In ski joring someone rides the horse, therefore the pull-ee doesn't have to worry about reins.

I set up my guy today (He was a driving horse before I got him...), with draft size hunting breastcollar, saddle and ran the lines from the breast collar, under one girth strap and then back to the toboggan with a quick release knot. My daughter led him and I rode for a few minutes in the toboggan...next time, she'll ride him and we'll see how that goes.

I must say that I hooked it up so I had a LOT more room behind than in those pics. Although that looks fun!

Cinder

Auventera Two
Dec. 31, 2007, 07:18 PM
Yeah, well -- distance horses are tough buggers, and what doesn't kill them just makes them stronger .... and tougher. :D Most distance horses I know are multi-dimentional creatures that do more than just one sport.

The OP doesn't drive so why the heck should she have driving equipment? All she wanted to do was a simple slid in the snow. She took her time introducing her horse to the tube, used precautions for herself, and made sure her horse was both nonplussed and happy to comply. And the photos show that -- a gal and her happy, easy-going equine having fun together in the snow.

A2 - your distance horse is just adorable -- as cute as a button, and seems to have the perfect attitude for driving. :yes: You might want to think about training her to harness -- it's a pretty handy sport for conditioning in distance.... and a big plus is that you can take hubby along for the drives as well. ;)

Thanks GTD :) I'm just so tickled with this horse! :D She's just a wonderful little girl with a great mind, and is a total team player. Whatever you want to do - she's game! You're right, she's a tough little bugger too. I don't exactly baby and pamper my girls. They have to get with the program and get tough. hehehe. Seriously though, all 3 of the girls have great minds, and I'd trust them with my life. I think that's one of the best attributes to a trail horse, and a distance horse especially. Arena only horses might be a bit hotter or spookier or "touchier" but a good trail pony is worth his (or her) weight in gold, right? :)

She ground drives very well, and I do have a harness, but no cart. Maybe santa can bring one for christmas next year!

This picture really cracks me up:
http://www.endurance.net/oreana/owyheecanyonlands/2007/Gallery02/pages/07OWYC149.html

THAT's having fun with your endurance horse!! :lol:

Auventera Two
Dec. 31, 2007, 07:21 PM
obviously you have no concern for your horse at all--

:lol: Yup, you're right. No concern at all. When we were done with this, I turned her lose in traffic on the highway. Thought it'd be fun to watch her dodge the semis. :D :rolleyes:

katarine
Dec. 31, 2007, 07:56 PM
aww, now I think that looks like fun and no big whoopie. It's not like she's asking the mare to pull 300 lbs of fatboy through mud ;) it's one slim woman and a fit Ayrab in the snow, whoop de do. I'm sure she took all the precautions she could to make sure the load was reasonable and well managed by the mare.

As much as I think A2/TS is a titch wacky in the feet arena, I am not going to whack her with Aunt Esther's purse just because. I think it looks like they both had fun ;)

Dalfan
Dec. 31, 2007, 09:15 PM
Those are some great pics! Looks like a lot of FUN (for the killjoy). What a good little mare you have there.


Just ignore him marta. He has a habit of thread crashing and starting fights. I can't read his garbage because he's on the ignore list. So stop quoting him.

What a smart girl you are!

Coup De Des
Dec. 31, 2007, 10:51 PM
it's one slim woman and a fit Ayrab in the snow,


one fit arab? ? ?


omg... hahahahahahahahhahahaha :lol:


sure Ok then.

marta
Dec. 31, 2007, 10:55 PM
didn't realize these were some deep resentments rearing their ugly heads;
won't be quoting him anymore...

so i'm still hoping for frickin' snow... temps are dropping so there is some hope... i guess i'll be endangering my mare, too;)

happy new year!

Romantic Rider
Dec. 31, 2007, 11:11 PM
That looks like a ton of fun, A2. I should try something new in the snow with my pony. I'm just glad to take a spin on her bareback. (nothing like a round, fuzzy pony to keep you warm on a cold day). But that sure looks fun.



:lol: Yup, you're right. No concern at all. When we were done with this, I turned her lose in traffic on the highway. Thought it'd be fun to watch her dodge the semis. :D :rolleyes:


Good one. ;) Crabby, smart-alecky people like that really get on my nerves.

katarine
Jan. 1, 2008, 12:30 AM
Coup, she didn't exactly long trot the mare to Miami, you know.

Look, I do think she's nutty over the foot drama and all that, and more than a little off, but some of you guys gut her for living, and loving horses. THAT's scary too you know. :lol:;):no:

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:28 AM
You stop the traces getting caught around her legs the same way you would when you are pulling a drag.

Perhaps one of the driving experts here can correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't drags engineered with enough weight to stop when the horse stops, and not ride up into the back of the horse's legs if the horse stops? I don't think a snowtube that has lost its passenger would do that. Also, if a horse is pulling a drag, that usually means it is early in the training and there SHOULD be someone at the horse's head. Period.


Your feet are your brakes. :rolleyes: Talk to anyone who ever attached a toboggan or sled behind a horse.

But if, as you must admit could happen, the "driver" came OUT of the snowtube, what's left to stop it?

I think this is a case of someone who did take all the safety precautions she thought necessary. The problem is, that person knows just enough about driving to be dangerous. You hook this up to that and off we go! Woo hoo! That person doesn't realize what a TRAINWRECK she chould have on her hands if one simple thing happened: She became separated from the rig.

I personally know of one horse (and I have very limited experience) that was rendered undriveable after his novice owners, having ground-driven him and judged him ready, hitched him up. No one was at his head that first walk around the arena, he reacted to the sound of the cart, kicked at it, and all hell broke loose.

For you folks who are so defensive about the OP, let me ask you one thing.

If someone posted a thread about "taking horse for first LD!" and had photos of a young horse, weighted down with inappropriate gear, wouldn't you react because you were concerned FOR THE HORSE? That's the situation here. The horse in the OP is is YOUNG, and because she has been conditioned for LD rides, I would assume very fit. I can't think of a single driving person who would agree that tying her to a snowtube and having her drag it is even close to a smart move.

pandorasboxx
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:44 AM
Christos.

It looked fun. Was fun I'm sure.

Pull up your pants folks. Your asses are showing and a few of you have rancid ones.

And at least one completely incomprehensible and illiterate one.

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:51 AM
Christos.

It looked fun. Was fun I'm sure.

Pull up your pants folks. Your asses are showing and a few of you have rancid ones.

And at least one completely incomprehensible and illiterate one.

That was rather uncalled for.

The "completely incomprehensible and illiterate one" happens to be a good egg who, if you took some time and read with care, absolutely knows what she is about.

If you are calling me an ass for pointing out a safety issue in which a horse could get seriously hurt, then I feel you are pointing in the wrong direction.

Yep, I agree. Looks like fun. Probably WAS fun. But it was dangerous fun. And I'm going to say something about it, and if what I post here makes even one person stop and think before mimicking it, then it's worth all the handslaps I get.

pandorasboxx
Jan. 1, 2008, 10:05 AM
If you are calling me an ass for pointing out a safety issue in which a horse could get seriously hurt, then I feel you are pointing in the wrong direction.

Yep, I agree. Looks like fun. Probably WAS fun. But it was dangerous fun. And I'm going to say something about it, and if what I post here makes even one person stop and think before mimicking it, then it's worth all the handslaps I get.

Thank you for your thoughtfulness. I know I needed a big dose of sanctimony to start the new year off right.

Unfortunately you may be tilting at windmills to go after "dangerous" fun on a horseboard. A horseboard that specializes in sports that are inherently so. ymmv....

But be my guest. I hear the eventing forum may have some scandalous photos.

Rodeio
Jan. 1, 2008, 10:16 AM
The funniest thing about this though is if the OP would have showed all this and then stated the person who did it got hurt in the process I bet at least half of you would then be ripping them apart at how unsafe this whole rig was. I have been driving horses for holy crap nearly 30 years and I still wouldn't hook something like this up! And I have all the proper equipment too. This is something that could have gone horribly wrong and had a completely different ending but oh well.....

Thomas_1
Jan. 1, 2008, 10:26 AM
Christos.

It looked fun. Was fun I'm sure.

Pull up your pants folks. Your asses are showing and a few of you have rancid ones.

And at least one completely incomprehensible and illiterate one. I presume that name-calling substitutes for intelligent conversation in your part of the sand-pit.

I think you'll find that one of the contributors is quite severely and obviously dyslexic. Perhaps you were too stupid to know or too ignorant to care about ridiculing a disability?

The thing that strikes me most of all about this posting is that its most often those who are messing about with pet horses and full of opinions about how they "love" their little pony who do these stupid things! They're the first to jump up and down when a professional does something they don't like.

Seems to me they know nothing! They don't even know they're risking their horse! This sort doesn't have the capacity to learn and spend their life bitching and moaning how the pro's have some sort of privilege or connection or dirty tricks or cruel practices. They don't want to or aren't able to see or hear that they actually DO things different! The OP is constantly passing opinion on what others do but clearly can't stand the heat of the kitchen.

I've been driving and training horses for decades and have been told that I have no fear but I'll tell you straight I wouldn't do anything like that. And its not because I'm a party pooper and sanctimonious, its because I like my life and I like horses and value and take responsibility for their safety.

So the OP went out and did something risky and had fun. Could have been entirely different and its just good luck, not good management that it wasn't. So still no accolades or words of support and encouragement from me. Just a strong sense of needing to urge others of caution to the risks.

pandorasboxx
Jan. 1, 2008, 10:38 AM
I think you'll find that one of the contributors is quite severely and obviously dyslexic. Perhaps you were too stupid to know or too ignorant to care about ridiculing a disability?

Aww....actually I don't give a rats ass. And besides, she wasn't the most egregious offender. She just gave me the worst headache.

So, I see your ham-handed sanctimonious prattle and raise you a middle finger.

Cheers~

Dalfan
Jan. 1, 2008, 12:07 PM
I presume that name-calling substitutes for intelligent conversation in your part of the sand-pit.

I think you'll find that one of the contributors is quite severely and obviously dyslexic. Perhaps you were too stupid to know or too ignorant to care about ridiculing a disability?

Pot, meet kettle.:yes:

Thomas_1
Jan. 1, 2008, 12:28 PM
Pot, meet kettle.:yes: Sorry I forgot that some readers might be TooStupid to know that that's called Socratic Irony! Duhhhh.

Funny, she doesn't seem to have the same problem over here; :no: DUHHHHH

Dalfan
Jan. 1, 2008, 12:52 PM
I presume that name-calling substitutes for intelligent conversation in your part of the sand-pit.

Thomas; DUHHHH,DUHHHH,DUHHHH. This is your statement, which applies to you perfectly.

But since YOU brought up the dyslexic issue, I was just pointing out a contradiction.

Wallysfolley
Jan. 1, 2008, 01:17 PM
That is so great! Its fun things like that, that really build the relationship between you and your horse.

My TB would have died. Just flat out died. My new horse...we'll see...she's pretty level headed so I dont think she would care.

Romantic Rider
Jan. 1, 2008, 01:29 PM
OMG, this is totally unbelievable. :eek: What is wrong with some people? Whoever is so worried about it being a safe situation for the horse, did anyone tell you that everything having to do with horses is inherently dangerous?? I can think of a whole lot more dangerous things people do with their horses. What do you do when you ride to make sure your horse won't do something stupid and hurt itself? Golly. Even going out for a short hack around the farm on a beautiful day could be a hazard to the horse if you want to think about it that way, let alone requiring a horse to do anything strenuous. Do you leave your horses in padded stalls all the time? (I'm assuming none of you critics are endurance riders) Horses are to have fun with, they aren't made of china. A2 was just having fun with her horse, and I think she did what was necessary to make sure the adorable mare didn't get hurt.

Dalfan
Jan. 1, 2008, 01:39 PM
OMG, this is totally unbelievable. What is wrong with some people?

I agree. Those pics look like great fun. But you must be aware of the...dynamics between A2 and T1? As sure as the sun will rise, he will zero in for a personal attack and some poking and prodding of A2. All because she DARES to disagree with the master in all things equine. That's my take on it, IMHO, of course.

Huntertwo
Jan. 1, 2008, 01:48 PM
And because I could see it wasn't a driving collar that's why I asked the following:

I notice you don't have a collar on. I also notice you have no trace carriers.

How did you attach the traces?

How did you prevent the mare pulling you from her mouth and the reins?

When you made your turn how did you stop the traces getting caught round her legs?

When she transitioned down from trot how did you prevent the tire going forward and into her?

Why do you put a numnah (saddlecloth)under her surcingle (you might call it a lunge roller?)? Or is it a driving saddle?? (difficult to see in the photo)

I thought you didn't like bits in horses. Do you always use one now? And are you always using a riding bit for driving and longlining etc? How do you compensate for the extra length of leverage?

Or doesn't safety for the horse matter when its snowing???

You know what Thomas? The Endurance/Trail riding Forum is probably the most nice, civil forum. So why don't you go start your ridiculous rude dribble on another board, if your looking for a fight so badly. You're boring already....

Go home!

Mersy
Jan. 1, 2008, 02:36 PM
All horses are inherently dangerous in ALL situations. You take a risk whenever you handle, ride, drive, breed, train, pet, walk into stall, load into trailer.....etc. Does it stop us from enjoying them? NO!

Mendin Fences
Jan. 1, 2008, 03:24 PM
That is so cute!!!! I love the pink tack!

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 1, 2008, 03:32 PM
I agree. Those pics look like great fun. But you must be aware of the...dynamics between A2 and T1? As sure as the sun will rise, he will zero in for a personal attack . . .

What personal attack? He asked a series of questions about the equipment on the horse.

And Hunterwo:

You know what Thomas? The Endurance/Trail riding Forum is probably the most nice, civil forum. So why don't you go start your ridiculous rude dribble on another board, if your looking for a fight so badly. You're boring already....

Go home!

Nicely contradicting.

I apologize for anything I may have said that ruffled all these feathers. And I don't need a similarly politely worded invitation as that extended to Thomas, I will remove myself from YOUR forum and go back to the Driving Forum, which is truly the most civil forum on this board.

Happy New Year :)

Dalfan
Jan. 1, 2008, 04:26 PM
What personal attack? He asked a series of questions about the equipment on the horse.

Yes, yes gyps. I think those that have followed this drama know exactly why he asked those questions and also the way he asked them. Again, the "Too stupid" remark along with the same old diatribe (re-read) validates my belief he is on a obsessive mission. I could be wrong, though.

Lisa Cook
Jan. 1, 2008, 04:38 PM
I'm all for having fun with my horses, especially in the snow. Heck - I even take them ski joring, too, and we have a total blast. I'm going to a ski joring race this weekend, as a matter of fact.

But there's a difference between having fun in a reasonable way, with reasonable safety precautions, and having fun in a Darwin's-Award-Candidate way. And the OP would be the latter, for sure.

Certainly there will always be risk associated with any horse sport, but it doesn't hurt to take a few more minutes to think things through and at least remove the unnecessary, entirely preventable risks, that I see in the OP.

Moderator 2
Jan. 1, 2008, 06:11 PM
Oh my - for goodness sakes - she was having FUN and no harm done! What is wrong with that??

Please, people, chill - it is only the first of the year, and we really don't want it downhill from here - just uphill. Play nice, please?? Otherwise, it will get closed. :(

And have fun in the snow - everyone forgets that snow is soft and fun!

Thanks, Mod 2

Huntertwo
Jan. 1, 2008, 07:40 PM
The thing that strikes me most of all about this posting is that its most often those who are messing about with pet horses and full of opinions about how they "love" their little pony who do these stupid things! They're the first to jump up and down when a professional does something they don't like.



Pet Horses??? Excuse me?? Why is that? Because some people have the #alls to do something different than ride in endless circles? :sleepy:

Or is that double talk and sarcasm trying to demean our horses?

You'll have to excuse me Thomas, I didn't realize you were some kind of Olympic rider or wanna be. Or perhaps you're just jealous? hmmmm..:yes:

hundredacres
Jan. 1, 2008, 08:16 PM
Aww....actually I don't give a rats ass. And besides, she wasn't the most egregious offender. She just gave me the worst headache.

So, I see your ham-handed sanctimonious prattle and raise you a middle finger.

Cheers~

Man, that's rude.


I swear I heard that line on Frasier once.

Auventera Two
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:02 PM
Thanks guys for all the kind words! :)

The pink tack! :lol: The bridle is from the local farm supply store, and the pad is a Hilason from Ebay. And I have plenty more where that came from! :D

We had such a GREAT time today! A group of us went out for a New Years Ride through about 2 feet of snow that's been falling over the last few weeks. Some of the drifts were belly deep! :eek: Okay, ALL of the drifts were belly deep! We rode for 3 hours. It was 20 degrees with 20 mph wind. Yikes. But the sun was out in full, and the snow in the forests was absolutely breathtaking. We saw lots of wildlife. :) I can't think of a better way to enjoy winter.

My girl was having a ball bounding through the belly deep drifts. She tried to lay down a time or two, and if we stopped for just a second, she was pawing and burrowing her nose under like crazy. :lol: I swear that horse is half dog.

We encountered snowmobilers, flocks of quail, and a frozen marsh area. We cross that marsh in the summer and it's just swampy ground and mud - no free running water. But it made a horrible shattering sound when we went over. Sweets put her nose down, sniffed, and proceeded with caution. She knew the area, and she knew it was safe too. What a good pony. The noise startled me and made me jump. The horse was less scared of it than I was. :lol: We lost the trail for a little while and had to squeeze between tight pine trees.

But I suppose we were putting our horses in grave impending danger. Ahh well, everyone lived, and rides like these draw off the years of ground work established. I raised her from a squirt so I suppose its only a matter of time before she snaps and kills somebody. Cause you know, I'm totally incompetent, and all that, and have raised a raving lunatic who can't be trusted. :lol:

I think it's far more dangerous to cross the big bridge that goes over the highway, with semis passing underneath. Or the swinging bridge that crosses the river below the dam. But not surprisingly, she trots straight across and doesn't even give a glance down. I really believe good trail horses are sewn from a different fabric. Breeding, training, and just plain miles are really your friend. Ohhh I yearn for the day when we can cross No Hands Bridge :)

enjoytheride
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:22 PM
How do you stop so you don't hit her in the legs? I've sledded with dogs but you have a handbrake or use your feet dragging in the snow.

Huntertwo
Jan. 1, 2008, 09:44 PM
What personal attack? He asked a series of questions about the equipment on the horse.

And Hunterwo:


Nicely contradicting.

I apologize for anything I may have said that ruffled all these feathers. And I don't need a similarly politely worded invitation as that extended to Thomas, I will remove myself from YOUR forum and go back to the Driving Forum, which is truly the most civil forum on this board.

Happy New Year :)

Boy, I didn't realize telling someone to go home was a personal attack...:lol::lol:

Nicker
Jan. 1, 2008, 11:46 PM
Lovely pics! It looks like a blast, but you can keep the snow and I'll take the pony. ;)



Just ignore him marta. He has a habit of thread crashing and starting fights. I can't read his garbage because he's on the ignore list. So stop quoting him. :D :lol:

It is a shame the ignore button doesn't include quotes. :lol:

I've been meaning to ask, but was that you A2 in the October issue of Stable Management? If so, nice pic of you and your girl. How's the search and rescue training coming?

KrazyTBMare
Jan. 2, 2008, 03:03 AM
Reminds me of my husband and his uncle on Xmas eve...

Im inside the house, getting the big dinner together with my father-in-law, and the guys (hubby, uncle, etc) are outside playing with our new 500cc 4 Wheeler we had just bought.

Well all of a sudden, driving past the kitchen window, I see my hubby driving through the yard, pulling a rope, and attached to the other end, is his uncle. Who mind you, is sitting on an upside down metal car hood, holding the rope with a handle bar on it, getting pulled around like a sled... on leaves.. in Florida. All I could say was "At least he has a helmet and gloves and knee pads on!"

To the OP, looks like a blast! And what a good girl for taking it all in stride. I dont see any difference in this vs a sled/carriage. Looks like the poor horse barely made it out alive!

goeslikestink
Jan. 2, 2008, 05:15 AM
Christos.

It looked fun. Was fun I'm sure.

Pull up your pants folks. Your asses are showing and a few of you have rancid ones.

And at least one completely incomprehensible and illiterate one.


you mean me on last quote

true i am so what thing is i dont hide from that fact and the difference between me and you
is i know when safe is safe -
if say she had hurt herself - whos fault would it have been if horse did run off --
hurt her hurt himself or both what say you then--
you think people are having a go a av2-- yep it does look like fun as most see it but the few that dont see in the same way see as dangerous and pontential hazzard what you fail to miss -- the selected few like myself and others

is we CARE so no neither gets hurts-- its not always about being clever it about being SAFE

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 2, 2008, 07:04 AM
Originally Posted by hitchinmygetalong, then quoted by Huntertwo:

What personal attack? He asked a series of questions about the equipment on the horse.

And Hunterwo:


Nicely contradicting.

I apologize for anything I may have said that ruffled all these feathers. And I don't need a similarly politely worded invitation as that extended to Thomas, I will remove myself from YOUR forum and go back to the Driving Forum, which is truly the most civil forum on this board.

Happy New Year


Response by Huntertwo:

Boy, I didn't realize telling someone to go home was a personal attack...

Huntertwo, the "personal attack" I was referring to was in response to this post by Dalfan:

As sure as the sun will rise, he will zero in for a personal attack and some poking and prodding of A2.

I challenge any of you who are calling those of us who have pointed out some safety issues with the OP's photos rude to go back and re-read the thread. You tell me who tossed out the first rude comment. I believe it was this one:

I can't read his garbage

It's obvious that there are some here who feel this is a smackdown of the OP. You're wrong. It's a handful of people who don't see things the same way others do, as goeslikestink says. Where some see "fun" others see potential problems.

And the very simple question that has been asked so many times has yet to be answered: How do you stop the snow tube from sliding into the horse's legs?

marta
Jan. 2, 2008, 07:46 AM
correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't it the first time EVER that a moderator had to get involved in a thread on the endurance forum? ironically all due to posts from the 'guests' from other forums.
the dislike for A2 in your posts is so transparent that i'd expect you'd be cheering her on hoping that maybe she'll get hurt in the process...

you made your point. must you really continue with the snarky comments and such?

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 09:59 AM
Lovely pics! It looks like a blast, but you can keep the snow and I'll take the pony. ;)

It is a shame the ignore button doesn't include quotes. :lol:

I've been meaning to ask, but was that you A2 in the October issue of Stable Management? If so, nice pic of you and your girl. How's the search and rescue training coming?

Hu?? :eek: Oh my gosh, you're right! I remember someone contacting me to ask if she could publish my picture and stuff, and I never followed up with it! :lol: I'll have to order the issue. Thank you for reminding me! :)

Oh, I'm so excited about the S&R training! We are at a standstill right now because of the winter, but training should resume in the spring. I'm having a blast with that. Of course, it's serious stuff, and none of us take it too lightly, but the training for our horses is really amazing. And to be a part of the community in that way is humbling.

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 10:01 AM
How do you stop so you don't hit her in the legs? I've sledded with dogs but you have a handbrake or use your feet dragging in the snow.

Feet in the snow! :)

goeslikestink
Jan. 2, 2008, 10:05 AM
correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't it the first time EVER that a moderator had to get involved in a thread on the endurance forum? ironically all due to posts from the 'guests' from other forums.
the dislike for A2 in your posts is so transparent that i'd expect you'd be cheering her on hoping that maybe she'll get hurt in the process...

you made your point. must you really continue with the snarky comments and such?

excuse me -- no one dislikes anyone - yes we do have disagreements with some issues normally the feet ones - its good to have a debate in issues as thats how we learn things from rubbish to good--
its not against the person if we disliked av2 for exsample then why would point out things for her and her horses safty--
we do becuase we are good horse people that not only cares for the horse by also for the keeper as with out the keeper the horse wouldnt have a home or be well cared for
so it in best interest to look out and after both
this is what all good horse people do especially if they are trianers like myself you look after the horse and you look after the rider / driver -- you lay golden safty rules down
and strict rules so everyone can enjoy the fun of having neds or being around neds to be
as safe as one can make it -- her fun could have have been quiet something else
and then you would say oh why did she do it - or iam sorry your horse had to be pts cuase it run off and got hurt, or worse av2 didnt get out of the comtraption she was in and that was the last bit of snow fun she had--- realalty in the real world things happen
yesterday luck was on her side -- will it be today or tomorrow
silly games get people hurt -- and animals if thre is one---

for exsample -- silly game some freinds had -a long time ago sernerios different principal the same

they dare each other to cross the motorway-- silly boy took up the game of chicken
he didnt make it home--- was hit by one car then a van that chopped him into 3

true storey my yard backs on to the motorway


thats how serious good horse people see this type of celver fun can lead to-- death

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 10:05 AM
you mean me on last quote

true i am so what thing is i dont hide from that fact and the difference between me and you
is i know when safe is safe -
if say she had hurt herself - whos fault would it have been if horse did run off --
hurt her hurt himself or both what say you then--
you think people are having a go a av2-- yep it does look like fun as most see it but the few that dont see in the same way see as dangerous and pontential hazzard what you fail to miss -- the selected few like myself and others

is we CARE so no neither gets hurts-- its not always about being clever it about being SAFE

for exsample -- silly game some freinds had -a long time ago sernerios different principal the same

they dare each other to cross the motorway-- silly boy took up the game of chicken
he didnt make it home--- was hit by one can then another that chopped into 3


thats how serious good horse people see this type of celver fun can lead to-- death


Oh yes, you're right. Pulling a sled behind your horse in the alfalfa field is the same as playing chicken with cars on the freeway and getting chopped into 3 pieces when you don't make it.

Wow. That's quite a stretch, don't ya think??

I think riders and horses who gallop cross country and jump solid objects are in far more danger. Or Tevis Cup riders who teeter along the side of a mountain for a hundred miles with 600 foot dropoffs just inches away. Or racehorses braking from the gate at top speed in a pack. And what about those trotters and pacers who have a pileup and all you can see is carts and drivers and horses flipping arse over teakettle down the track? Or barrel racers who gallop 30 miles an hour toward a barrel and then slam on the breaks and make the turn without wiping out? Ever watched any of the working cow events at rodeos? You have cowboys jumping off horses at a gallop and onto the back of a cow with ropes flying everywhere. And lets not even THINK about puissance jumpers! Holy crap. Yikes. How much potential for broken legs or blown suspensory apparatus is there when a horse is clearing a 7 1/2 foot solid wall?! Seems to me like just about anything we do with a horse is dangerous. Except maybe western pleasure. But then according to most everyone, that's cruelty. *sigh* Maybe we should just all take up knitting. Oh no, wait, you could poke an eye out with those big needles. Darnit. Crossword puzzles? Bird watching?

Don't worry about me too much. I'm a big girl. ;) :winkgrin:

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 10:17 AM
marta -

Absolutely correct, on both accounts. Rather sad, too. Maybe it would be best if they simply move along to be guests on this thread (http://chronicleforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=128062).

Still no snow here. Just bitter cold and high winds. Ugh! However, I did get my dose of snow through a Happy New Year reply e-mail yesterday from my endurance horse's breeder (lives in the same state as A2 and is a former president of the CAA). She sent an attached photo of her driving her pair of Arab/Welsh ponies to a bob sled! She said her hubby had to take the tractor out into the fields to plow a path, just so they could use the sled. I couldn't believe the piled drifts from the tractor blade -- almost as high as the sled itself.

But what a grand photo! :D

Oh my gosh, that CUTE PONY!!!! :lol: :D How sweet!! That just made my day! And look at that happy dog too!!

So sorry you haven't gotten snow yet, that would be a real bummer. Some years we don't have this much snow yet, so we are really enjoying ourselves this year! :)

I climbed the snowbank at the end of our driveway with the horse (while riding). It is probably 8 feet high!

Huntertwo
Jan. 2, 2008, 01:10 PM
I challenge any of you who are calling those of us who have pointed out some safety issues with the OP's photos rude to go back and re-read the thread. You tell me who tossed out the first rude comment. I believe it was this one:


It's obvious that there are some here who feel this is a smackdown of the OP. You're wrong. It's a handful of people who don't see things the same way others do, as goeslikestink says. Where some see "fun" others see potential problems.

And the very simple question that has been asked so many times has yet to be answered: How do you stop the snow tube from sliding into the horse's legs?

With all due respect Hitch,
These are people I've never seen on this forum before. Although, of course everyone has the right to post on any forum.

It just seems odd that they all came out of the *wood work* the same time A2 posted her pictures and poked and prodded her for answers they clearly could have cared less about.. IMO

Lisa Cook
Jan. 2, 2008, 01:48 PM
Great website (http://www.nesja.com/AboutNESJA.html)! And the video (http://www.nesja.com/Videoclip.html) of the galloping quarter horse pulling the ski jourer over jumps and through a slalom course was incredible. LOVED the music, too!! I am such a Sawyer Brown fan! :cool:

Lisa - are you going to post videos of your runs?? I'm amazed they even have a division for kids 10 and under. Do they use ponies to pull the skier, or horses?

No, no videos - I don't own a video camera. Pictures are a possibility, however. :) Last year my youngest son competed as a Pee Wee (age 10 & under). This year he has to move up, so he's a little apprehensive about facing stiffer competition!

You can use a pony or a horse. In the picture I posted earlier on this thread, the grey horse I'm riding is actually a grey PONY - she's 14.1, but built like a brick house. She's actually speedier than my 16.2 hand Appy who I'll be riding this weekend - he's all legs, and still, at the age of 6 with a full season of eventing under his belt, he does not have the most efficient gallop in the world. The pony was born with a fabulous gallop. :)

I actually just got organizing a ski joring clinic for our pony club, which was held last week. Some folks from the NESJA came and spent quite a while introducing the kids and ponies/horses to the sport in a gradual, safe, and appropriate manner using proper equipment and everyone had a ton of fun. I think we have some new converts to ski joring. :)

LostFarmer
Jan. 2, 2008, 01:59 PM
We, being rednecks, always had a winter carnival when I was a kid. We packed the snow and had cutter races with horses. A team on a light weigh sled is a sprint. My personal favorite is the elk hide race. An elk hide is tied to a rope about 25-30 feet long. The cowboy then drags the victim on the elk hide down the arena and around a barrel. Switch places, as in the one on the hide is now on the horse. It is a wreck waiting to happen. It is usually horses that are fresh and haven't been used much. Dead elk hide is enough to have a few buck and snorts. :eek: The best were the husband and wife teams compete. ;)

LF

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 03:06 PM
We, being rednecks, always had a winter carnival when I was a kid. We packed the snow and had cutter races with horses. A team on a light weigh sled is a sprint. My personal favorite is the elk hide race. An elk hide is tied to a rope about 25-30 feet long. The cowboy then drags the victim on the elk hide down the arena and around a barrel. Switch places, as in the one on the hide is now on the horse. It is a wreck waiting to happen. It is usually horses that are fresh and haven't been used much. Dead elk hide is enough to have a few buck and snorts. :eek: The best were the husband and wife teams compete. ;)

LF

Oh, that's hilarious! Loved your redneck comment too. Way too funny! :lol:

Mozart
Jan. 2, 2008, 06:23 PM
I'm all for having fun with my horses, especially in the snow. Heck - I even take them ski joring, too, and we have a total blast. I'm going to a ski joring race this weekend, as a matter of fact.

But there's a difference between having fun in a reasonable way, with reasonable safety precautions, and having fun in a Darwin's-Award-Candidate way. And the OP would be the latter, for sure.

Certainly there will always be risk associated with any horse sport, but it doesn't hurt to take a few more minutes to think things through and at least remove the unnecessary, entirely preventable risks, that I see in the OP.

What iyo is inherently riskier about the OP tubing behind her horse than skijoring (the method where the skier also drives the horse)? I don't drive so I don't know squat about harness but it struck me that the only (not trying to minimize it) substantial risk would be if she fell off (resulting in loose horse with tube attached to it), as opposed to a skier, who would be able to disengage himself if he fell, resulting "merely" in a loose horse.

If she doesn't fall off, it seems to me she would be able to use her feet to brake should the horse stop quickly. Seems to me that would someone's main concern, having a system to keep the tube from zooming up behind the horse.

Huntertwo
Jan. 2, 2008, 07:30 PM
We, being rednecks, always had a winter carnival when I was a kid. We packed the snow and had cutter races with horses. A team on a light weigh sled is a sprint. My personal favorite is the elk hide race. An elk hide is tied to a rope about 25-30 feet long. The cowboy then drags the victim on the elk hide down the arena and around a barrel. Switch places, as in the one on the hide is now on the horse. It is a wreck waiting to happen. It is usually horses that are fresh and haven't been used much. Dead elk hide is enough to have a few buck and snorts. :eek: The best were the husband and wife teams compete. ;)

LF

OMG..That sounds like SOOOO much fun!! I'd love to be the "victim" and try that, although Elk hides might be hard to come by in CT..:yes:

Huntertwo
Jan. 2, 2008, 07:33 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/A-Tanned-Elk-Hide_W0QQitemZ270199883032QQihZ017QQcategoryZ22702 QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Anyone up for it?;)

Nicker
Jan. 2, 2008, 07:43 PM
Hu?? :eek: Oh my gosh, you're right! I remember someone contacting me to ask if she could publish my picture and stuff, and I never followed up with it! :lol: I'll have to order the issue. Thank you for reminding me! :)

Oh, I'm so excited about the S&R training! We are at a standstill right now because of the winter, but training should resume in the spring. I'm having a blast with that. Of course, it's serious stuff, and none of us take it too lightly, but the training for our horses is really amazing. And to be a part of the community in that way is humbling.

You can have my copy if you'd like, but it is a tad worn. :) I read all my horsey mags many times over. PM me if you're interested.

Auventera Two
Jan. 2, 2008, 10:08 PM
Oh my goodness, those videos were a hoot!! The dirt sledding has me rolling and wiping tears! :lol: :lol: :lol:

hundredacres
Jan. 3, 2008, 08:04 PM
It just seems odd that they all came out of the *wood work* the same time A2 posted her pictures and poked and prodded her for answers they clearly could have cared less about.. IMO

Hey, hey now....I saw the cool title that was on the front page for this board for a while and had to take a peek. I didn't realize visiting different boards on COTH was a crime! I only commented on the rudeness so I realize the fingers aren't pointed directly at me, but I couldn't help but take it personally since I rarely (maybe never) post on this board.

Auventera Two
Jan. 4, 2008, 09:51 AM
Good post GTD. Certain posters I just plain ignore because of the stalking tendencies. :lol: Interesting to note these same people who are so concerned about my horse's welfare haven't bothered to post on their other skijoring and sleading behind pony threads. Hmm. I wonder why their horses aren't in grave, immediate danger?

OH my gosh, sledding on car hoods and dead animal skins! What a riot! I rode yesterday outside with the windchill at 0. I thought - what the heck, I'm young and resilient. Better take advantage of it while I can. Well, I think I frostbit my cheekbones. The horse's 1/4 sheet kept flipping up over onto one side because of the wind. I managed to get in a couple of nice long canters down the field before deciding it was time for hot coffee and a blanket. :lol:

Lisa Cook
Jan. 4, 2008, 11:13 AM
Good post GTD. Certain posters I just plain ignore because of the stalking tendencies. :lol: Interesting to note these same people who are so concerned about my horse's welfare haven't bothered to post on their other skijoring and sleading behind pony threads. Hmm. I wonder why their horses aren't in grave, immediate danger?

Since you asked...for starters, in the picture "small 1", you are within kicking distance of having a hoof land on your forehead and at no time were the people on the other thread within such close distance to their horse's hind feet as you are in that particular picture.

Lisa Cook
Jan. 4, 2008, 01:35 PM
When you ride in a groomed ring, perhaps these are things you just don't think about.

I do with my event horse, all the things you mention plus more. Trail ride alone for miles? Check. Ride in the dark? Check. Gallop him through the snow? Check.

Has he ever kicked? No, never. Do I expect him to? No, of course not! Eventers have to trust their horses, too. But would I choose to put myself in the position you chose to put yourself? No.

Sithly
Jan. 4, 2008, 02:15 PM
For another thing - when I tail up on hills, I'm within a couple of feet of her hind heels. She would never think of kicking out.

Just out of curiosity, what does that mean? I'm unfamiliar with the term.

Auventera Two
Jan. 4, 2008, 02:22 PM
I do with my event horse, all the things you mention plus more. Trail ride alone for miles? Check. Ride in the dark? Check. Gallop him through the snow? Check.

Has he ever kicked? No, never. Do I expect him to? No, of course not! Eventers have to trust their horses, too. But would I choose to put myself in the position you chose to put yourself? No.

The operative word being "choose." If you choose not to - then don't. I don't believe that anyone is holding the gun to your noggin so it shouldn't matter. :) :cool:

Stilthy - tailing up is dismounting and grasping the tail with one or both hands on steep inclines and letting the horse pull you up while you walk or jog. It saves the horses energy if you don't ride all the hills. People go up steep hills usually slower than a horse does so hanging onto the tail allows you to move faster, and keep your balance. Maybe GTD can give more in depth info on it??? I started teaching my girl about it on the flat roadway first, with driving lines. We have a few decent hills on some of our trails and she is now tailing up on those hills, just for the experience and exposure to it. Not that we ride enough to actually warrant doing it, but it's good practice.

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 4, 2008, 02:53 PM
hundredacres -

the OP and another poster, and the OP was stalked to this forum.

That would be ... incorrect. No one "stalked" anyone. The term "stalking" conjures up images of people hiding around corners waiting to jump their prey. Using that term in this situation is totally inappropriate.

Just because people are not actively posting to a forum does not mean they aren't reading that forum. There is no lock on any doors, you don't need a gilded invitation to come and join.

I was personally alarmed at some of the rigging in the OP's photos and I PM'd Thomas for his opinion. So if someone wants to place blame or get angry at someone for the ensuing pissing match, blame me.

I'm still concerned about the rigging but have decided to just let people have their fun. No one was hurt, and I'm sure I would be right there playing along if I didn't know what I know from my exposure to the driving world.

I just want to set the record straight on what compelled Thomas to post on this thread.

Have a good weekend.

Huntertwo
Jan. 4, 2008, 02:54 PM
Hey, hey now....I saw the cool title that was on the front page for this board for a while and had to take a peek. I didn't realize visiting different boards on COTH was a crime! I only commented on the rudeness so I realize the fingers aren't pointed directly at me, but I couldn't help but take it personally since I rarely (maybe never) post on this board.

Hundredacres, It wasn't about you at all :yes:... It was already explained, but there is a poster who is always busting A2's arse. He followed her on this forum and made himself a royal pain in the arse argueing over ridculous things that weren't any of his business. Thats all...

Ja Da Dee
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:05 PM
... argueing over ridculous things ...

That depends on what you call ridiculous. I believe he just asked a few reasonable questions about the safety precautions that just about anyone who has driven a horse would ask. If you've actually ever witnessed the carnage a horse harnessed up can cause, you may not understand why there is concerns from people who have. I wonder how one uses their feet to stop the tube when they are kneeling in the tube?

I mean, if someone was posting about how they decided to ride their pasture puff 15 miles in the heat without proper conditioning and hydration concerns, wouldn't the members of this forum ask a few logical questions about the safety aspects?

mp
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:22 PM
I guess trail/endurance people just develop a bond and trust relationship with the horse to the point you would trust your life to them, and they likewise. If I didn't, I wouldn't ride in the dark, or on umfamiliar trails. When you're 15 miles from the nearest human help, your horse is your life line. That's why you spend a lot of time cultivating a strong bond.


Who knew trail riding was such a death-defying adventure? I had no idea my horse and I were being so brave. I'm not going to tell him -- we also show in dressage and breed shows (in groomed rings) so he might get nervous and decide to start kicking. :rolleyes:

Auventera Two
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:25 PM
Hmmm. Then where exactly was Thomas on the thread that was linked a couple of pages ago? Kids in a sled behind a bucking pony and barking dogs. Didn't seem that he said a word about that did he? ;) Nahh, and he won't. He wasn't asking honest questions. He just couldn't pass up a stick poking opportunity. That's why I ignore him and his cohorts. So until he posts on that other thread how dangerous it is, I'll maintain that I know what his motivation is. :winkgrin: I mean after all, it was linked right here. Shouldn't be too hard to find the thread.

Some of us don't maintain our horses like precious china dolls ready to shatter under duress. Some of us actually use our horses, have fun with them, and oh, you know, train them so they have a little brainpower. :D

hitchinmygetalong
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:30 PM
He's probably not posting on the other thread for the same reason I'm not posting on it, and stopped posting on this one. This thread taught me a very valuable lesson - that people simply perceive things differently. What some see as fun, I see as dangerous. They aren't going to convince me it's fun and I'm not going to convince them it's dangerous.

There is no "I'm right and you're wrong" about it, as both sides are right in their own minds, and there will be no changing that.

Sithly
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:40 PM
Stilthy - tailing up is dismounting and grasping the tail with one or both hands on steep inclines and letting the horse pull you up while you walk or jog. It saves the horses energy if you don't ride all the hills. People go up steep hills usually slower than a horse does so hanging onto the tail allows you to move faster, and keep your balance. Maybe GTD can give more in depth info on it??? I started teaching my girl about it on the flat roadway first, with driving lines. We have a few decent hills on some of our trails and she is now tailing up on those hills, just for the experience and exposure to it. Not that we ride enough to actually warrant doing it, but it's good practice.

Hah. Hahah. You know, I thought that's what it might be, but then I thought "nah, that's too bizarre." But apparently nothing is too bizarre for horse people. :lol:

People really do this? Seriously? Do you keep a hold of the reins somehow?

Lisa Cook
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:40 PM
Some of us don't maintain our horses like precious china dolls ready to shatter under duress. Some of us actually use our horses, have fun with them, and oh, you know, train them so they have a little brainpower. :D

Who, exactly, are you referring to with this comment? I believe many posters here who are questioning your judgment have established that we have trained horses that we also have fun with - both in rings and in the great outdoors. And perhaps you've missed it, since you have Thomas on ignore, but he has many posts, complete with pictures, that show that Thomas does far more with his horses than I'd daresay most people on this BB do. Outside of a ring and everything.

I'd like to know which poster(s) you are referring to with the above comment, out of curiosity.

pandorasboxx
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:44 PM
That depends on what you call ridiculous. I believe he just asked a few reasonable questions about the safety precautions that just about anyone who has driven a horse would ask.

I don't know either of the two parties in question and while a relative newbie-even I am aware of the antipathy they have towards each other. No big state secret. I can only surmise that the intent of "hitchinmygetalong" was to stir the pot by alerting the questioner to jump in and not as they claim, to save unsuspecting thread viewers from a gruesome death at the hands of their horses.

Another big open secret is that the OP has the interrogating poster on "ignore." Surely if my green arse knows that then he is well aware of it. Sooo.... what would be the point of him coming here, asking her a laundry list of interrogating questions, if the OP cannot see them nor be inclined to answer them? It's pretty clear that he was here simply to perform and posture for the rest of us. Just ahead of the brayings of the safety patrol.

Sometimes a turd in a punchbowl is just that-a stinky turd, even when wrapped in a mantle of solicitousness and topped with a jaunty Scotch tam o'shanter.

kmw2707
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:48 PM
Hey AT!

I think my kid's pony (or even Tia) would be a hoot to try this with.

I dont think this has been addressed (but I have been known to be wrong) but isn't it quite possible that the tube is not even attached to the horse? Than AT is kneeling on the lines that attach to the surcingle so if she should happen to fall off, the tube would not follow the horse?

Ja Da Dee
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:53 PM
I know that my very first thought when I read the first post was "explitive ... how does she stop that tube from sliding up her horses back legs?!?" I've seen how horses can be effected when something slides up their bum, then the aftermath of trying to cut them out of the lines. If A2 wants to go and have fun, cool, but there were quite a few posters that thought it looked fun too. Is it not reasonable to let them know the potential dangers? What if it was a kid thinking it was fun, and they go get their heads kicked in, or thier horse injured because if this irresponsibility?


editing to add, my horse isn't a hot house flower either. He events, he does dressage, he does trail riding, in his prior life, he did sorting and penning... while he LOVES his stall, he doesn't require one.

mp
Jan. 4, 2008, 03:53 PM
I'd like to know which poster(s) you are referring to with the above comment, out of curiosity.

Me, too.

Everyone who rides a hot house flower, please raise your hand. Now go away and don't post on this forum again. We're all friendly here. And brave.

Auventera Two
Jan. 4, 2008, 04:51 PM
Hah. Hahah. You know, I thought that's what it might be, but then I thought "nah, that's too bizarre." But apparently nothing is too bizarre for horse people. :lol:

People really do this? Seriously? Do you keep a hold of the reins somehow?

:lol: GTD or some of the other experienced endurance people probably know more about, as they probably actually "have" to use it. I've just played around with it for practice.

Some people unclip the rein from one bit ring, and hang onto the other end, and some people do it "on the honor systsem" they call it. You just drop the reins on the neck and let the horse go. I've kept hold of one rein for now. I saw a guy on a ride doing it and he'd jump off while the horse was still trotting, the horse would trot past him, he'd grab the tail, run up the hill, and jump back on, still at a trot. Wow, he was athletic. (And tall!)

kmp - Aww, Tia would be great for sled pulling! :lol: Could you imagine your girls laughing? :D How cute would that be!

The way I hooked my line to the tube and back to the horse was to snap it on one side, then the other side was tied with a quick release. I have since done it another way using two separate lines, and tying a knot in the very end of each. You thread the knot through the tube handles, and if the handles flex too much, the knots pop out of the handles. But I became detached a little more often than I wanted. Maybe bigger knots would secure it better You could use bailing twine too. I think that's how BuddyRoo did it on that other thread.

hundredacres
Jan. 4, 2008, 05:33 PM
I think the safest way to go about this on my own farm...still fun though....would be have a rider on the horse "ponying" the sled or intertube. That way the rider could let go if needed. The pull-behind type shown here by A2 and in the "other" thread (I could hardly watch that one it freaked me out so bad!) are just too scary looking for my wimpy old self ;). But then again....that is why I don't post on this forum. Endurance people are a whole 'nother level of horse people than me *blush* and I don't have nearly the gts to do what you guys do.

Dalfan
Jan. 4, 2008, 05:40 PM
That would be ... incorrect. No one "stalked" anyone. The term "stalking" conjures up images of people hiding around corners waiting to jump their prey. Using that term in this situation is totally inappropriate.

Oh, this is hilarious. Isn't that what your gang does in "the box". Waiting for A2 or some others to post so you can copy it over there and ridicule or "jump on your prey"? Too, too funny.

Auventera Two
Jan. 4, 2008, 05:59 PM
OH yeah Dalfan, I checked out their thread there too. :lol: Even down to making fun of my clothing and "western" styled helmet. And saying it would be ok if it were a sled or a tobaggan. But since it's a plastic inflatable tube, it's horribly dangerous. And saying endurance horses are $400 hillbilly nags....blah blah blah.....

Well, apparently my 400 dollar hillbilly nag is a lot more trustworthy than most 80,000 dollar show horses. Laugh! And excuse me, but she's a 1,000 dollar hillbilly nag, thankyaverymuch.

Isn't the internet grand? :D I only read a thread or two on that board when someone mentions an interesting one. It's amazing that people have so little to do with their time, isn't it? lol

Dalfan
Jan. 4, 2008, 06:16 PM
OH yeah Dalfan, I checked out their thread there too.

You mean "your" thread. :lol: You must feel so special, sorta like a badge of honor. :lol::lol:

~Freedom~
Jan. 4, 2008, 06:47 PM
You mean "your" thread. :lol: You must feel so special, sorta like a badge of honor. :lol::lol:

How come I knew that if I saw your post it would lead to a comment about the pile? There are several people mentioned there not just A2 and even yourself gets the honorable mention ( dishonorable?). You must find it fascinating to even know what is being said.

This sport is done in Montreal on the canal but under more stringent conditions ( accident occur even there)and anyone that just hooks up a plastic inflatable is not paying attention to safety protocols.

Dalfan
Jan. 4, 2008, 06:56 PM
How come I knew that if I saw your post it would lead to a comment about the pile? There are several people mentioned there not just A2 and even yourself gets the honorable mention ( dishonorable?). You must find it fascinating to even know what is being said.

Well..there are several posters from the pile posting on this thread. Makes me wonder if they are posting with "good" intentions or to just start/finish a wreck. Oh, please, let's hope it is dishonorable. Your last sentence doesn't compute.


This sport is done in Montreal on the canal but under more stringent conditions ( accident occur even there)and anyone that just hooks up a plastic inflatable is not paying attention to safety protocols.

Oh, geez, the girl had some FUN with her horse. Perhaps all the T's weren't crossed or the I's dotted, to T1's specifications, too bad. Big deal. I've seen much more dangerous stuff than this. His post was very transparent.

Huntertwo
Jan. 4, 2008, 07:29 PM
That depends on what you call ridiculous. I believe he just asked a few reasonable questions about the safety precautions that just about anyone who has driven a horse would ask.

Ja, that was my point. I don't believe he was caring about A2's safety. If you have followed his other posts, he pokes at her quite a bit.

Huntertwo
Jan. 4, 2008, 07:41 PM
You mean "your" thread. :lol: You must feel so special, sorta like a badge of honor. :lol::lol:

Yep, you know you made it to the big league when your ridiculed in "The Box". Heck, one of my "Mis-quotes" made it on there too...:lol:

It went from my post regarding my brother and myself bumper skiing, to -

My parents letting me do this from their pickup....:lol::lol: And how parents would be busted if they let their kids do that in todays world...

Gee, I never even noticed my parents owning a pickup..:winkgrin:

Huntertwo
Jan. 4, 2008, 07:44 PM
Not sure I'd call it death-defying

I dunno - When my pony jumped the lightly iced over stream today instead of walking through it, it was pretty death-defying- at the moment anyway...:eek:

Romantic Rider
Jan. 5, 2008, 12:03 AM
Huntertwo, that's funny. Then I go through death-defying every time my pony crosses any kind of water. :D She is the most ridiculous little mare, cannot stand to get her feet wet, seemingly. Today we were riding through the woods, everthing covered in about a foot of snow, and then we came to a puddle and little stream, very, very little stream, she could have stepped over it. She almost had a panic attack at having to cross it. Now this is an endurance horse, and the gamest horse I've ever ridden, but she cannot stand crossing water.


Anyway.... are some people still talking about safety precautions? Oh for pete's sake. Those who are need to have a serious talk with most endurance riders. I mean, is riding a large, spirited, extremely fit horse all by yourself in the middle of no where, perhaps miles away from anybody else, on an unfamiliar trail... is that taking proper safety precautions? Hehe... no! :) ;)

For that matter, tying a horse up, something probably everyone does, is not at all safe. I mean, a horse can get it's head stuck under a tie shoulder height, and get even a high tie wrapped around it's neck. Thus, to ensure we are taking all possible safety precautions, we should never leave our horses alone. :eek::winkgrin:

Auventera Two
Jan. 5, 2008, 09:29 AM
RR, hehehe, isn't that funny how they all have a little something that's the boggie man? :lol: My girl is nervous around geldings. She gets worried if one gets too close. Can't trust the guys, you know. That ride we did in New Prospect, I had to get off and walk because she was getting so nervous. She calmed down after 5 minutes or so, but horses will always be horses.

Yep, I bet 99% of the show crowd would be horrified that endurance riders tie their horses to a tree, or to a horse trailer all night - alone. I admit it made me extremely nervous the first time I did it. I didn't sleep a wink all night - I kept sticking my head out to be sure they were okay. And they were, standing with a back leg cocked sleeping or munching hay. So many things could happen, but when your ride starts at 5 a.m. (or earlier) in the middle of a forest, what else are you going to do? People use those little portable paddocks too and that looks more comfortable. I hope to have a setup before this coming ride season. But plenty of people tie also. I hope my little hillbilly nag will be getting a new portable paddock before spring hits! :D

Gotta run - off to engage in some good ole' dangerous fun - we have a trail ride starting at 9. In the deep snow.

Thomas_1
Jan. 5, 2008, 02:04 PM
Hmmm. Then where exactly was Thomas on the thread that was linked a couple of pages ago? Kids in a sled behind a bucking pony and barking dogs. Didn't seem that he said a word about that did he? ;) Nahh, and he won't. It might not have occurred to you but its NOT all about YOU. I know you're paranoid but I do actually post quite a bit and usually on anything that is of interest to me.

I have actually posted on the Endurance threads from time to time before and on other threads too.

What happens is you click the little button on the top that says "new posts" or the one that says "today's posts" and if you see anything that appeals, then you post. Its how bulletin boards work.

Not too hard to figure out I wouldn't have thought.

Then in some cases other members actually send PM's with links and specifically ask me to have a look at something or even to post advice. And sometimes I do and sometimes I don't.

The fact that there's a bunch of folks who are ignorant of the dangers and goading and taunting and who are just lauding the fact that someone who knows no better is doing something with a horse that is positively dangerous does not appeal to me.

You want to do something risky, then go ahead and please yourself and be reassured by the egging on of your cronies on here that you must merely be having a ball and its all great fun


He wasn't asking honest questions. He just couldn't pass up a stick poking opportunity. Well in fact I was. But its clear that many who posted don't have a clue why or what I was even asking about.

Then where exactly was Thomas on the thread that was linked a couple of pages ago? Kids in a sled behind a bucking pony and barking dogs. Didn't seem that he said a word about that did he? Nahh, and he won't.
Well in fact I never saw it and wasn't bothering to read here. And I still haven't seen any link. But just so's you know I don't see my role as providing fodder for those in a frenzy nor educating the stupid.

However, if you do have me on ignore then you woudn't know if I'd posted there or not ;). Though I know that last time you said you had me on ignore, you were sending me PM's so I'm really not too sure how your ignore facility works.


Some of us don't maintain our horses like precious china dolls ready to shatter under duress. Some of us actually use our horses, have fun with them, and oh, you know, train them so they have a little brainpower. If you're trying to make a point, then its extremely poorly made considering what I do with my horses.

Huntertwo
Jan. 5, 2008, 05:24 PM
Today we saw a very strange blood trail that looked like a deer had been freshly killed and then drug up a tree. The blood trail went right to the base and then UP. Yikes. The horses were very edgy and we didn't hang around to investigate but just high tailed it back toward the trail. We'd gone through a marsh and into a heavy pine thicket for a mile or so. Don't know if they have big cats here in the north but didn't want to find out either. The "hillbilly nag" was very well behaved. :) We rode for 4 hours, no clue how many miles. We did a lot of cantering. This is perfect riding weather right now as the snow is so deep and we have NO ICE! Here's a picture from after our ride, getting ready to go home.

Boy he looks great, considering that you had the poor thing trudging through the snow for 4 hours...But I've always heard that "Hillbilly nags" are pretty hardy.
Hey, maybe we should start our own Registry? They'll have to be lowly trail horses though...lol

Do you have Mountain Lions where you are? I can't imagine any other animal carrying something that big up a tree.. scary..:eek:
Unless is was a Fisher Cat carrying a piece of a deer up a tree..:confused:

Romantic Rider
Jan. 5, 2008, 11:45 PM
Did you say 4 hours? Wow, you are brave. I go riding in the winter, but usually for only about half an hour, around the farm a little bit. Deep snow is one thing. Like I said, I have a game pony who'll go through just about anything (except water), and at any speed I want. But yesterday I rode, and the snow was so crusty... I mean, there were like two or three layers, and it had a really thick crust on top, and of course it's over a foot deep. Ugh... I want nice, fresh, fluffy snow. It's supposed to rain tomorrow, that would be worse. You're mare is so cute. I oughta post some pictures of me riding my fat fuzzy pony bareback. I look at pictures of her when she was in 'endurance shape', and can hardly believe she is the same horse. :D

Lisa Cook
Jan. 6, 2008, 12:04 AM
I ride on the snowmobile trails around here. They are great for the footing - they pack the snow down nice and smooth and you can ride for hours, if you are so inclined.

Of course, riding on the snowmobile trails means that we do come across snowmobiles. But that's no biggie, as I can hear them approach well before they reach me. We just step off the trail until they go by.

Auventera Two
Jan. 6, 2008, 10:36 AM
We pretty much stay off the snowmobile trails. My main riding buddy and myself are really nervous about them because around here the sport of choice seems to be drunk snowmobiling. We stay in the woods off the trails. Also we found that the trails get icy from over-use. The footing is just too dangerous.

RR - yes, we rode for 4 hours. The weather and footing were beautiful. Today, not so much. It's raining and I had to spread 50 lbs of barn lime just so the horses could hobble from hay pile to hay pile. The entire farm is a skating rink. Our winter riding may well be over now unless the temps drop again and we get a lot more snow. We'll see.

mp
Jan. 7, 2008, 11:54 AM
Oh, this is hilarious. Isn't that what your gang does in "the box". Waiting for A2 or some others to post so you can copy it over there and ridicule or "jump on your prey"? Too, too funny.

If you've got a problem with what goes on at that board, why bring it up here? Since you lurk, just go ahead and voice your opinion there.

AV2: no one called your horse -- or any trail or endurance horse -- a "$400 nag." You've implied many times that you think the ability to put up with trail obstacles is the be-all and end-all of horsemanship. It was simply pointed out that if putting up with boogers is your top criterion for a mount, then there some very inexpensive horses available -- "$400 hillbilly nags" -- that can do that, too.

Dalfan
Jan. 7, 2008, 12:09 PM
If you've got a problem with what goes on at that board, why bring it up here? Since you lurk, just go ahead and voice your opinion there.

Oh, I have no problem, trust me. Just thought I would point out the apparent contradiction and hypocrisy, IMHO of course, of the statement I quoted.

mp
Jan. 7, 2008, 12:23 PM
Oh, I have no problem, trust me. Just thought I would point out the apparent contradiction and hypocrisy, IMHO of course, of the statement I quoted.

It would be hypocritical if it were a closed board and you weren't allowed to post there. But it's not. TLB is open, for all to see and enjoy and say what you think, including you and AV2. No one is hiding. Except maybe the lurkers. ;)

Dalfan
Jan. 7, 2008, 12:40 PM
Really, mp, I was just pointing out, in case there were some on this thread that weren't aware, that not all is at it seems, in terms of "intentions" or "motives" from certain posters that joined this thread, but are regulars on the pile.

jazzrider
Jan. 7, 2008, 02:34 PM
Is this a train wreck on the quiet little Endurance and Trail Riding forum? :eek: How exciting! I go away for a bit come back to find a thread on this forum that topped 100 posts! What could be that interesting on this peaceful little forum? Trolls have come! Somewhat transparent ones, at that. Thanks for the entertainment, A2. ;) I'm sure they'll go back from whence they came. We're just too sleepy over here. :winkgrin:

Now, if it was me, I'd take the greatest offense about the comments about your helmet. I think it's nifty. :yes:

Huntertwo
Jan. 7, 2008, 03:02 PM
Is this a train wreck on the quiet little Endurance and Trail Riding forum? :eek: How exciting! I go away for a bit come back to find a thread on this forum that topped 100 posts! What could be that interesting on this peaceful little forum? Trolls have come! Somewhat transparent ones, at that. Thanks for the entertainment, A2. ;) I'm sure they'll go back from whence they came. We're just too sleepy over here. :winkgrin:

Now, if it was me, I'd take the greatest offense about the comments about your helmet. I think it's nifty. :yes:

Yes, A2's fan base even follows her onto the Endurance Forum. I don't if I would be flattered by the certain *fans* though... ;)

Auventera Two
Jan. 7, 2008, 05:01 PM
Now, if it was me, I'd take the greatest offense about the comments about your helmet. I think it's nifty. :yes:

That helmet is great! :D It's much cooler in the summer than the shiny schooling type helmets.

~Freedom~
Jan. 7, 2008, 08:03 PM
Really, mp, I was just pointing out, in case there were some on this thread that weren't aware, that not all is at it seems, in terms of "intentions" or "motives" from certain posters that joined this thread, but are regulars on the pile.

Sounds like someone is paranoid. That place doesn't bother me one whit.

jazzrider
Jan. 8, 2008, 11:43 AM
That helmet is great! :D It's much cooler in the summer than the shiny schooling type helmets.

I just got it in black last month! :D I've never had a helmet fit so well and not make me feel like a bobble head! :yes: