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View Full Version : Feed back please...... I want to hearfrom all of you no matter what level you ride..



BigRuss1996
Dec. 9, 2007, 09:09 PM
Okay.....I have gone back and forth on posting this to the point of typing and erasing over and over....but here goes. I think you all are my best shot at a wide view with unbiased opinions. If you were to give a grant for eventing either to riders or horses where do you think that grant would be most useful within the sport and why?

olympicdreams04
Dec. 9, 2007, 09:17 PM
I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Dec. 9, 2007, 09:20 PM
What about some sort of grant for instructor education? Possibly subsidizing applicants to the USEA ICP?

annikak
Dec. 9, 2007, 09:49 PM
Totally agree with ICP- we need to make that program stronger and better. Its the future, as I see it. With education, so many things can happen- and if the ICP program gets stronger, there is hope for a more education for all...trickle down education:lol:.

I do think if there was money to spare, a grant for studying the conditioning of tendons and ligiments would be great- a study following horses thru out the season, with U/S and HR monitors- I think that might be awesome, too. But...

education begins it all.

3Day-Eventer
Dec. 9, 2007, 09:52 PM
I agree with the ICP suggestion. It would greatly benefit the trainer, who would then benefit countless #'s of eventer over the years!!

BigRuss1996
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:02 PM
OKay before you all go crazy on the ICP thing..... just to clarify....We are not looking to benefit the professionals or the already "known" riders.

This is a question more of which riders at what level, and or should it be for the horses and at what level or whatever. Not looking to help fund programs or support peoples instructors here .....trying to help actual eventers.... think entries, off set travel expenses, etc.

luveventing
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:05 PM
personally- I think ages 25-35 and up are the most difficult when it comes to expenses and competing. There are still many serious riders who did well as YRs or got a late start, but are either working full time jobs, or trying to "make it" as a pro. Its a really difficult time financially and is a lot of times the end to a promising career when these riders are forced out of the sport due to finances. There are grants for YR's, there are grants for Adult Amateurs, but not so much for those in between.

purplnurpl
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:09 PM
1st off I believe that benefiting coaches by giving scholarships for the ICP certification is a great suggestion. Our Area V adult riders is for ammys and pros, and offers an ICP grant each year.


I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the
sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.

Also, there is an outstanding bias in this sport towards adult amateur riders.

so let me rephrase the above statement.

I think that there are a lot of talented riders out there that graduated high school and college and often do not have the funds to clinic with BNTs or take weekly lessons from a regional coach, or attend competitions to qualify for the developing riders program. With the young adults as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of the funds.

The 25 to 35 age group always seems to be lost in the mix. And I am a current activist. [wink]
The USEA also awards two Worth The Trust Adult Amateur Scholarships each year. There is an age group cut off for Young Adult (25 and under I believe), and Adult Amateur Scholarships. The young adults again are awarded more.

If a scholarship is to go towards riders and competition, I think the Beacon Charm Grant really nails it.
You must show proof of:
[amongst other things]
low income
outstanding competition records

A grant(sponsorship) would also be very useful in aiding CICs and CCIs. Or even organizers starting new venues. Organizers are stretched very thin. The thinner they are stretched, the higher our entry fees.


That's all I've got. I'm not very good with these things. My imagination goes ka-put and suddenly my scope is shallow. : (

CookiePony
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:13 PM
I would love to see a scholarship for adult amateurs like the Dressage Foundation's Gifted Fund (http://www.dressagefoundation.org/The_Carol_Lavell_Gifted_Fund.htm). It is designed to give adult riders time away from the pressures of work and family. I for one would love to have such an opportunity.

ETA: OK, so I forgot about the Worth The Trust scholarships. But the Gifted Fund awards more (smaller) scholarships per year, I believe.

ETA again: I do see what purpl is talking about re the gap in help for adult pros who are building their careers, but are not yet big names.

purplnurpl
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:21 PM
A Prelim rider ready for a CIC*.
Good competition record.
Wanting to travel out of state.
A well thought out plan that will land them at a developing rider camp.
[Developing riders is for CIC** and up] So at least a two-three year calender plan SHOULD be up and running for those of us that are serious.

I continuously have a 5 year running plan. laughing.
I'm looking at my life next year and I"m thinking, sh*t...I've got the 1st string horse and a back up horse on the way...but now I need: Shadbelly, Top Hat, Double Bridle, Travel Trailer (not cowboy trailer), entry fees, fuel to get to Jersey Fresh, (I'm in Texas), Fair Hill, a Feb. at Ocala and Red Hills.
OMG my eyes just blew out.

As for the horse. To fund a horse's medical care (such as joint injections) feed and supplements? That would be fantastic as well. Uckele pretty much owns the key to my horse's success.

Some of our horses have great stories and are destined for the top. I think funding a horse would put a great spin on the idea of helping out a rider financially!

ride-n-tx
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:28 PM
Purplnurpl and olympicdreams i totally agree! the 25-30ish range is a financially difficult time and a lot of riders have to cut back on riding or forego it altogether for the time being. i am a 25 and i only know a handful of other riders my age. i would love it if this age group could get some notoriety or some help somehow!

RiverBendPol
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:29 PM
personally- I think ages 25-35 and up are the most difficult when it comes to expenses and competing. There are still many serious riders who did well as YRs or got a late start, but are either working full time jobs, or trying to "make it" as a pro. Its a really difficult time financially and is a lot of times the end to a promising career when these riders are forced out of the sport due to finances. There are grants for YR's, there are grants for Adult Amateurs, but not so much for those in between.

**BINGO!!!!!!!**

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Dec. 9, 2007, 10:35 PM
When you say "most useful to the sport" what do you mean?

Put another way, what do you want to accomplish with the grant - broadening access to training, helping one person make it to the top maybe, helping 10 people or a region be safer, getting people used to saying, "The BigRuss1996 award" or or or?

I'm positive we can come up with lots of ways to help you spend your money, but having a better idea of your goals could target the suggestions. Also, are you talking some sort of major grant, or a couple hundred bucks?

pass
Dec. 9, 2007, 11:01 PM
I think that it is difficult to decide how to set up a grant, when you are not sure how much the grant is going to be for. Yes, entry support and travel support, are all wonderful things. I think offering a grant to a Non-sponsored rider is a first step. There are several upper level, up and coming riders out there that are sponsored, but can still apply for grants and scholarships.
Some riders are very talented, and have made it to the upper levels, but have not had the horse to keep going. Some have the horse, and really need the money to travel, and off set the expenses at home while traveling. Some horses need expensive vet care to keep running. Some riders have been there and done well, but need help getting there again.
With that, I think that it really depends on what the goal is with the person/firm/group wanting to set up said grant.
Their motivation is key in deciding on who, and how to spend the money. Some people really enjoy having a horse go out and win, some people are really supportive in supporting the process of getting there. Again it boils down to what they have to offer, and what the person lucky enough to receive the grant needs.
Also making it known that there is a grant out there. It can be difficult to fine the grants that are available.
The American Horse Trials Foundation lets the rider decide how to spend the money(within reason) that they have raised. But you are still limited by what you were able to raise. Believe me it is a great help, but you are still hoofing it to find people to help support you.
So I say the things that a rider at the upper levels needs(at least one that does not have the funds or sponsor already) would be: Entry/stabling, vet care, travel expenses, continuing education(clinics), equipment, horse(s), and the knowledge that there are people out there willing to help.

Lori T
Dec. 9, 2007, 11:17 PM
I think that there a lot of talented young riders out there that, once they age out of JR and graduate high school, often are no longer supported by their parents (if they were in the first place) and do not have the funds to attend the competitions to qualify and then to attend NAYRC. With young riders as the future of the sport, perhaps this is the best use of funds.

As a parent of a daughter who graduates from high school in 6 months, I have to agree! Paying college with another child already in college and another coming along in a few years is going to make it tough!

ksbadger
Dec. 9, 2007, 11:29 PM
I might have to zip up my firesuit but I beleive there's all too much money devoted to YR and AA already. If you're looking to help the future of the sport look at subsidizing - and making it a whole lot easier - to get younger judges. Have you looked at the average age of even the lowest-level officials these days? There needs to be an eventing program with the reach & universality of the USDF L Program - and, maybe, the acceptance of those who have already gone through that program.

tx3dayeventer
Dec. 9, 2007, 11:37 PM
I agree with KSBadger. I would love to become a judge or official but it seems so unattainable here in Texas (aka Area V). I have tried to look into it and I have the eventing background (CCI***/CIC-W***) and would love to "give back" and it would allow me to be at an event and *gasp* make a few dollars while in Grad School. When I looked into the program it would involve ALOT of out-of-state travel just to get the hours and clinics in.

Blugal
Dec. 9, 2007, 11:43 PM
Agree with tx3dayeventer. I've made my interest known to TPTB, but no response. Know someone else approx late 20s early 30s who did it - it was very onerous to become a TD. Now they are talking about having an "Eventing Judge" designation which would enable events to hire fewer officials - to save costs, but also b/c there aren't that many to start with.

Not sure if that is what the OP is looking for though... I agree with an above poster who asked, what do *you* want from it?

Something that hasn't been mentioned is what about helping subsidize a nice young horse & making sure the breeders get paid/recognition? I am in the 25-35 wanting to go Adv. camp, but due to finances, the only horses I can afford are OTTBs (not that there's anything wrong with that - but I have seen some very nice purpose-bred horses, they start at $15K and I bet the breeders are basically breaking even on a 4 or 5 y.o. for that price).

BigRuss1996
Dec. 10, 2007, 08:29 AM
My reasoning?.......... We already give a grant (actually mentioned by someone else in this thread) but it seems to get little to no response every year. we wanted to find out if we are on the right track as far as what is really needed in the sport because maybe the lack of applicants was due to our grant just being so old it was really not needed where it is. Now I see that we aren't wrong that it really is probably just not advertised enough by the organization currently handling it. Now I know that maybe it just needs to be better handled. Thanks for all of your replies..... I appreciate it.

RiverBendPol
Dec. 10, 2007, 09:50 AM
Having a 24 year old daughter struggling her way along, I'd say it is not easy to learn about grants, where they are available, how one applies, how they are awarded, etc. Where are they advertised? How does one find out about grants offered? Maybe some of your $ could go toward making them more readily accesible?

sharri13
Dec. 10, 2007, 10:28 AM
I agree with Purpl's thoughts -

I think an AA that is ready to pursue to upper levels seriously, but may not have the funds to do so would greatly appreciate such a grant. I would start with riders who are ready for a * that will be followed by Intermediate.

purplnurpl
Dec. 10, 2007, 10:33 AM
The Grants are listed on the USEA website. And yes, they are hard to find.

Some people were nice enough to forward info along to me; I then was able to search the USEA site for them.

I think if the USEA had a thumbnail that was titled: GRANTS it would be much simpler.
Laughing.
Until mid year I had no idea these opportunities were available.

As for listing with certain organizations...if the grants are for eventers then the USEA is the place to be.
The USEF site is so difficult for me to navigate that I don't bother logging on. If I have a question I usually just call.

The Area sites should really list grant opportunities as well. ALL grant opportunities
I think it was our Area V site that mentioned the Worth The Trust Scholarship. But then again it is much much more general than the Beacon Charm Grant. They are for two very different types of competitors.

As for the comment that too much money is already going to YR and AA. I only know of the above two. And those only cover one rider per grant/scholarship. That is not too much.

Pwynnorman is about to mention working students. Agreed on this. I am not a working student because my BNT's working students pay 600 bucks a month.
I laugh everytime I think about it. How are working students supposed to pay for that if they are already working +++ hours weekly?

pwynnnorman
Dec. 10, 2007, 10:42 AM
To working students.

If you look at the most successfully enduring riders, very nearly all of them have been working students of other successfully enduring riders.

If you look at the ones who last only as long as their best horses, many have been out on their own way, way too soon.

Plus the old guard has a heck of a lot of knowledge to pass on about horse management, but it may NOT get passed on if their students only learn from them through lessons and clinics. AND the "trickle down" effect from the ex-WS to his or her future students could also be significant and retain the continuity of good horsemanship I'm sure we'd all like to see preserved.

But the economy isn't very supportive of living off of someone--becoming a WS for any significant period of time now takes money, too. Room, board and board for your horse is no longer as common for WS's as it used to be--and years ago, the most sought-after mentors were charging a lot for the priviledge even then.

So my vote would be for a grant funding a minimum of six months (or one "season") of full-time WS experience for post-YRs.

CookiePony
Dec. 10, 2007, 10:56 AM
You know, if I had had more information about the Worth The Trust grant I would have applied for it this year. I had heard of it but really didn't comprehend that applications were being accepted and that it was something I could shoot for. I desperately need some intensive training-- had I won it, I would have used it to go to Denny Camp.

Now, the Gifted Fund only gives $750, but to one person from each USDF zone. $750 would not cover the entire Denny Camp for me but it would sure make it a lot more affordable. And if the smaller award meant the impact of the grant could be bigger, because 10 people (just a ballpark figure because of the ten Areas) would get it instead of one, so much the better.

purplnurpl
Dec. 10, 2007, 11:01 AM
what is this "Gifted Fund"?

Hilary
Dec. 10, 2007, 11:01 AM
I like the working student subsidy idea too - I cannot tell you how much I learned in my summers as a working student for 2 different BNT - dressage and eventing.

There is no comparision to working full time taking care of a barn full of horses, watching how the best of our sport work every day, and having instruction from them in all things.

I also have my pony club H-A, so yes, I learned a ton getting that, but you know WHERE I got the knowledge to pass that? From being a WS. Not just looking at books.

You can only learn so much riding and caring for your own horse - because there is too much to learn - you have to immerse yourself in a place where someone does know what they are doing and can teach you, and have enough horses for you to learn from - at a 40 horse barn there is always someone who is injured, sick or in need of some kind of special care. And you'll get to learn how to fix it.

I could do this because my parents allowed me to not work during the summers at a paying job. I also didn't have to pay to be at the farm- they had to come up with pasture board for my horse and the farm had trailers the WS all lived in and we paid $50 a month or something similarly paltry.

Being an adult (of any age, frankly, let's not limit it to 25-35) with a job and a life makes it hard to take 6 months or a year to be a WS, for reasons not limited to finances, but finances are a huge part of it.

Good idea Pwynn.

CookiePony
Dec. 10, 2007, 11:15 AM
what is this "Gifted Fund"?

http://www.dressagefoundation.org/Gifted_Fund_Information.htm

CookiePony
Dec. 10, 2007, 11:16 AM
Also, check this out-- for up and coming elite riders:
http://www.dressagefoundation.org/Help_For_High_Performance_Dressage.htm

luveventing
Dec. 10, 2007, 11:23 AM
the working student thing is great- if you don't have to work for a living and take time off work to go. I could probably manage a few weeks, but not 6 months. I did several working students stints as a college student then then for about 2 years after graduating. But then reality set in and I could just not afford to work for someone else anymore- nor did I want to. I was ready to head out on my own, but buying a farm, working full time and trying to get OTTBs up the levels is NOT an easy road! I am just sadly looking at the point where I have a limited number of years that I can be putting out this kind of money and my youngsters aren't even upper level horses yet.

not related to grants- just a pity party I guess!!! sorry!

BigRuss1996
Dec. 10, 2007, 12:52 PM
Having a 24 year old daughter struggling her way along, I'd say it is not easy to learn about grants, where they are available, how one applies, how they are awarded, etc. Where are they advertised? How does one find out about grants offered? Maybe some of your $ could go toward making them more readily accesible?



RiverBendPol - You have hit it on the head. This is my big beef with the system. People can not apply for grants they do not know about. There is not enough advertising, when you suggest advertising your grant you are told that it will be "on the website" .... well... that would be great if everyone actually knew to look for it.

I do like your idea of a way to make a way for grants to get better exposure.... Ours will most likely end up going out on its own into its own foundation to do this.... but maybe something needs to be developed to house grants so people can find them more readily. I just don't think they are treated with much importance.

pwynnnorman
Dec. 10, 2007, 01:48 PM
Efficient communication is not USEA's strong point, alas. How about a grant to fund a communication audit and integrate the resulting recommendations into the organization's operational strategic plan? :yes:

InVA
Dec. 10, 2007, 01:57 PM
How about giving a grant to working adult amateurs - People who have full time jobs who fund their riding out of what they EARN and could use help with lessons, competing etc...

(...and if you do this let me know where I can apply! )

;-)

Janet
Dec. 10, 2007, 01:57 PM
I agree with KSBadger. I would love to become a judge or official but it seems so unattainable here in Texas (aka Area V). I have tried to look into it and I have the eventing background (CCI***/CIC-W***) and would love to "give back" and it would allow me to be at an event and *gasp* make a few dollars while in Grad School. When I looked into the program it would involve ALOT of out-of-state travel just to get the hours and clinics in.
One of the things that was on the agenda of the BoG on Sunday, but I had to leave before they got to it, was a "fast track" licensing process for *** riders. Email me if you want details.

Janet
Dec. 10, 2007, 01:58 PM
Efficient communication is not USEA's strong point, alas. How about a grant to fund a communication audit and integrate the resulting recommendations into the organization's operational strategic plan? :yes:
There is a strategic planning meeting in March.

Janet
Dec. 10, 2007, 02:03 PM
WRT to scholoarships, CDCTA gives out several scholarships each year, and have very few applicants (some years 0).

I know that Area II also has very few applicants for some of their scholarships.

Maybe there would be some way of putting together a central source with links to all the scholoarship offers?

Janet
Dec. 10, 2007, 02:06 PM
How about giving a grant to working adult amateurs - People who have full time jobs who fund their riding out of what they EARN and could use help with lessons, competing etc...

(...and if you do this let me know where I can apply! )

;-)Such an applicant would be well receved for the CDCTA scholarship - since you are in VA, but I do not know where.

Foxygrl516
Dec. 10, 2007, 02:13 PM
I don't know if this is at all helpful... probably not. haha But this is just how I tend to see things. That said, I don't know exactly where the grant would be MOST useful.

It seems from my view point that most help out there is for young (ish) riders competing at the FEI levels. There are a lot of very talented riders at the lower levels that 1) may not be at YR eligible age anymore and/or 2) can't afford the training to get them to their potential.
I know there are a lot of great stories about YRs that with "very little" financial help from their parents made it to the upper levels. Or the touching stories of "jane" who wanted to ride and showed real talent, but her parents couldn't afford a nice horse so they sold the farm and got 3 more jobs just so little Jane could have the opportunity. Most of us come from families who morally support our love of the sport, but are realistic about selling the family out just so one of the children can have a nice mover. (I just re-read that and it could sound a bit bitter...lol I promise I didn't mean it that way! lol)

My point is, I would love to see more scholarships given to dedicated but not necessarily "aiming for the Team" riders. After all, aren't some of those the ones being mentioned in other threads as sometimes being 'scary' or not confident enough because they don't get enough training? I know the USEA gives one scholarship to AAs (not like Becky Holder Amatures) that has probably already been mentioned on the thread. I think that is a GREAT idea. Adults with jobs and goals riding at Novice or Training level get like $3000 a year for lessons and clinics. I guess it just sometimes annoys me to see Miss Awesome Youngrider and her super-fancy import running Intermediate get financial assistance so they can get more training..... Some of these kids could hire Wofford as their private at-home trainer for the price of those ponies, they probably don't need the USEAs help. JMHO

yellowbritches
Dec. 10, 2007, 02:43 PM
The Worth the Trust scholarship is for AAs. It gives $2000 a year to the recipient to use for lessons and clinics. A pretty sweet deal.

However, I think AAs and YRs do get a TON of support from the USEA (as someone else already said). This isn't a bad thing, but once you age out of YRs a lot of young adults, striving for careers in the sport, get sucked into a black hole if they don't have the backing of mommy and daddy. I would love to see support for this group (granted, I'm one of them ;)), to be able to feed themselves properly, keep horses sound and fit, get good, consistent help, and make it to the next event without having to sell their souls! If they get the help they need as they get started, we'll be able to continue to have a large pool of talented, successful, good horseman to choose from when it is time to make teams.

I also like the working student idea. Though it would probably need some decent guidelines (a 18 yr old with a fancy horse that mommy and daddy sent off to play horsies for a year with a BNT probably isn't a good candidate. While the WS who begged their way into the position, then work 15 hrs a day to get the chance to ride SOMETHING probably would be).

cevent
Dec. 10, 2007, 02:56 PM
Foxygrl516--I totally agree with everthing you wrote.

I am 20, not attending college (by choice) to ride/train horses with a friend to better my riding and hopefully get myself out there to have horses come in for training and sales for myself, eventually down the road.

I've competed up through training and have borrowed horses for the last 4 years due to lack of funds for my own horse. I believe with the right horse I could be going prelim but have not been able to persue that again, due to the lack of funds/horse. My parents support me 100% with this sport and would love to see me go as far as I can, but cannot support me financially, and well, horses as my means of living doesn't help either...lol They arn't going to sell off the house or take out mortages and loans just so I can have a horse that can take me to the top and I am greatful for what support they have given me so far and what they hopefully can help with in the future, and that I've had to work hard to be where I am now.

I'd love to see a grant for riders who are capable of competing at training and above but that don't have the funds for competing multiple times a month, lessons, clinics, and overall help with paying for their horse or funding so they can buy a horse (I know that sounds like a lot, but something along those lines) Something like what a sponsor would do? I agree that it seems like the YRs who have *that* horse and have their parents financial support are recieving grants. Not that they don't deserve them by any means, but its more likely that they will reach the top (or reach their goals) without the help of the grants. I believe the AAs or YRs who are on their own financially would really appreciate a grant for them.

I guess to apply for a grant like this, a rider would need to fill out an application, send in a video of their riding, maybe of their own horse and another or two showing their capablility, and maybe a clip from an event? These are all just ideas and thoughts and me rambling :)

ss3777
Dec. 10, 2007, 05:03 PM
Wow, I hope this grant is available in 2009, I would love to apply. I remember reading about it “once upon a time" but I probably figured I would never qualify. Well, I read the information thanks to BiggRuss and I would love to apply for it next year. I read through the qualifications and I should have applied for 2007!!! Alas, I missed the deadline. I think there is also a part of me (and maybe others) that thinks............I should let someone else more deserving win this. But god knows I definitely could use it!!!!

Thanks BIGRUSH!!

retreadeventer
Dec. 10, 2007, 05:16 PM
Okay.....I have gone back and forth on posting this to the point of typing and erasing over and over....but here goes. I think you all are my best shot at a wide view with unbiased opinions. If you were to give a grant for eventing either to riders or horses where do you think that grant would be most useful within the sport and why?

Don't know if this has been mentioned - but rather than a rider, I would rather a grant were given to publicity for the sport. That will bring in people, horses, entries, owners, supporters, sponsors, etc. Publicity. Real, good, longterm. That's my wish. Give someone qualified a GOOD SALARY to just run around and post results, write stories, get stuff on YouTube, TV, talk shows, blogs, feed good information and correct results with good pictures to the media and handle the bad stuff when it happens. That's what I would do with it. It would do much good for the sport. Horses are only as good as their management, and riders go up and down depending upon what horse they are riding.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 10, 2007, 06:14 PM
Don't thank me..... that one isn't our grant... ha ha ha.. But probably like ours it doesn't get enough advertising. People can't apply if they don't know it is there. I can't tell you how many people I meet who are working students or riders who have never heard of most of the grants available to them.



Wow, I hope this grant is available in 2009, I would love to apply. I remember reading about it “once upon a time" but I probably figured I would never qualify. Well, I read the information thanks to BiggRuss and I would love to apply for it next year. I read through the qualifications and I should have applied for 2007!!! Alas, I missed the deadline. I think there is also a part of me (and maybe others) that thinks............I should let someone else more deserving win this. But god knows I definitely could use it!!!!

Thanks BIGRUSH!!

4Martini
Dec. 10, 2007, 07:34 PM
It seems like a lot of riders with limited means fall in the cracks when a horse gets hurt. It would be cool if there was a grant to ride with a showjumping or dressage trainer to broaden your skills while your horse was on the mend. Especially as people usually are fighting large vet bills and put their development on hold to offset these - well maybe I'm unique, but that's my experience.

Not sure this would help put people on the team, or expand membership - but it could provide a lot of good karma to good people who hit a patch of bad luck.

Maybe require grantees to be interviewed for the eventing magazine - to get an interesting story and publicity out.

eventing addict
Dec. 10, 2007, 08:08 PM
I like the idea of helping riders in their 20's. Speaking from personal experience it is quite hard to stay competitive straight out of college, especially if you did not catch the 'young rider' train. There are many of us that teach some, sit on anything we can get, and save all our pennies to train and compete. I think that a grant to cover travel expenses, training cost, and entry fees would be AMAZING!

I also think that it would be great for people preparing for a three day.

PIP
Dec. 10, 2007, 09:04 PM
is the post YR years (say 25-35) after they've left the proverbial nest and prior to becoming financially established in their career. I think there is a lack of continuation of the progress started in the YR years and it's substantially attributable to financial reasons.

pwynnnorman
Dec. 10, 2007, 09:47 PM
Maybe require grantees to be interviewed for the eventing magazine - to get an interesting story and publicity out.

Super idea.

ksbadger
Dec. 10, 2007, 10:24 PM
Don't thank me..... that one isn't our grant... ha ha ha.. But like ours it doesn't get enough advertising. People can't apply if they don't know it is there and that it IS something they could get. I can't tell you how many people I meet who are working students or riders who have never heard of most of the grants available to them.

Russ,
You haven't even hinted as to what your grant's focus is but, rather than one to a specific person or group, what about using it to set up or promote a training program for licenced officials in the center of the country (where the need exists) rather than at either coast? Failing that, as ultimately both dressage & eventing officials are USEF, to set up one that encourages suitably qualified & committed dressage candidates to move over to eventing (say L* Graduates who also meet the "ridden at Prelim" requirement). I firmly beleive that using a grant to increase the numbers of future officials is much better than any temporary help to an individual rider.

pass
Dec. 11, 2007, 12:41 AM
I just have to say, there is nothing worse (and this is just my bitter opinion) then saying that when children leave the nest and are struggling, that they are more entitled to extra support than the senior rider that has been struggling for years, getting it done, not giving up, and keeps going through the sweat and tears.
I do not believe that the qualified young rider should not be helped, I just think that breaking it down to age(say 21-35), in a sport where we all compete equally is just not right. If the young rider is the best qualified to meet the requirements for the grant, then by all means, give it to the YR. If the senior rider, whether a professional or amateur, best fits the bill, so be it. This sport allows us to compete equally regardless of age.
For those of us that were not able to get to the upper levels while still being eligible to be the highest placed young rider at a 3***, we can still keep pushing, knowing that there is still a chance to get to a 4**** even if it means we are 50 when we finally get there.
But again, this all boils down to what the person/group would like to see there money accomplish.
So ends the rant.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 07:50 AM
As said already in a previous post .... we already do have a grant and it has been around for a number of years! (since the late 80's).... I was mostly trying to find out if we were targeting the wrong group now that the sport has changed so much since we never get the response I feel there should be... OR....is it as I have suspected all along that because it does not get advertised enough no one really knows about it. Because of this thread and all of your responses I see we ARE on the right track and it is as I thought it is because of not enough advertising.

RiverBendPol
Dec. 11, 2007, 10:46 AM
As said already in a previous post .... we already do have a grant and it has been around for a number of years! (since the late 80's).... I was mostly trying to find out if we were targeting the wrong group now that the sport has changed so much since we never get the response I feel there should be... OR....is it as I have suspected all along that because the organization does not advertise the grant no one really knows about it. Because of this thread and all of your responses I see we ARE on the right track and it is as I thought it is because of no advertising.

Am I missing something here? BigRuss, first of all, thank you for your grant! Anyone putting up a grant nowadays is beyond generous and I am sure doesn't get enough credit.
Now here is the (possibly) dumb question....What IS your grant, at whom is it aimed, where is it advertised, how does one apply? :winkgrin:

Robin@DHH
Dec. 11, 2007, 12:36 PM
Maybe out of left field, but here is another viewpoint. Rather than supporting one or two
riders, take the funds and have competition where people submit their ideas on what they
want to do to support the development of the sport. The winner of the competition would
receive seed money to help get their idea off the ground.

A couple of possibilities come to my mind from reading the threads so far.

A proposal to start a grant center for eventers where riders could come (perhaps via
internet) to find out about grants and awards. Probably also hold seminars on how
to find a sponsor and keep them happy.

A proposal to set up a breeding program to produce promising eventing horse prospects
that would be given to upcoming riders who need a talented mount to continue their
efforts in eventing.

The proposals would have to be much more elaborate than what I have listed and would
need to have some explanation of where the ongoing expense to support the activity
would be raised, where any facility to support the activity would be located, who the
people who would initially carry on the work would be, etc.

The above are just illustrations of what I mean by proposals; I took these from what folks
here have said they see as needed.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 02:34 PM
Am I missing something here? BigRuss, first of all, thank you for your grant! Anyone putting up a grant nowadays is beyond generous and I am sure doesn't get enough credit.
Now here is the (possibly) dumb question....What IS your grant, at whom is it aimed, where is it advertised, how does one apply? :winkgrin:


Okay...... Our grant has been around since the late 80's...It is The Beacon Charm Fund. It was developed after our horse Beacon Charm (who won the Rome CCI with Bruce and was headed for the WEG) died suddenly in his paddock. His career was cut short he was only 12 yrs old and my parents rather then just use his insurance money to buy another horse took it and formed this grant in hopes that it might make his death seem less senseless and maybe it could help a young person at the beginning of their career to get a leg up. The grant is for young people ages 18 to 35 who are competing at Intermediate and above (I am thinking of changing this to who have done a prelim 3 day) who have asspirations to go to the advanced level. The hope was that the grant could help them to get more exposure, and to progress through help with entries, travel expenses, and lessons, clinics, or training sessions.
we first had it with the USET but they really are more for Team related things so we moved it to USEA about 5 or 6 years ago. They I feel do not advertise it enough and so each year we barely get 5 or 6 applicants and not all of them are usually within the criteria because as I said before I don't think all of the applicants really read the criteria. It is given out annually BUT if an individual appears to be doing really well with it the selection committee can opt to give it to them for another year as was the case last year. We have a selection committee made up of upper level riders and trainers who do clinics etc and are from various parts of the US so we have representation from most of the areas. They have all been really great and are totally unbiased and really excited about the grant and have bothered to really know what it is for. It isn't easy especially when we DO get more suitable applicants as there are usually a few riders it really could go to. This is when I wish that it were better handled and maybe invested so it could grow and maybe someday we could help more then one rider at a time.
The last recipient of the grant was Kristen Bachman she got it for 2006 and 2007. In 06' we had them re-open the deadline and advertise after we only got I think 4 applications, and we ended up with 10 more people!!...Kristen being one of them otherwise we would have missed her. We have just received the applications for 2008 and I am disappointed once again with the applications. I believe it is mostly due to no one knowing it exists, and also the fact that they keep putting the deadline for applications in early Nov. So I am moving the date for next year and I will advertise it myself because I am tired of hearing people say they didn't know it existed. If I have to I will make it its own organization as that is what it is looking like it is coming to. It does not directly benefit the organizations so maybe that is why they really don't seem to advertise more....its sad really.

To apply people are suppose to notice when it gets put up on the website (usually in Oct sometime). You have to really check because they usually only have it up there for a few months. It is closed for 2008 and I am not sure right now what will be happening for 2009.... though I can say it will be being advertised more unlike in the past.

4Martini
Dec. 11, 2007, 03:09 PM
ooh - that sounds really cool! (Not that I even aspire to that level) But, I'd love to read about what was done with the grant last year and how she hopes to use it this year. What an interesting article! Do you think she' write something for the USeventing? Can anyone submit something to that magazine?

Or even easier maybe have a COTH contest for 10 questions to ask "Beacon Charm Grant Winner" Kristen (and we can sneak on in about the grant...) as a side bar for the magazine... I would guess they are always looking for stuff to fill sidebars (but not sure - anyone know.)


Do you think we she would be open to something like that? It would get the name out.

RiverBendPol
Dec. 11, 2007, 03:23 PM
BigRuss, THANK YOU for your detailed explanation! What a lovely way to honor a great horse. I am sorry I had never heard of the grant, on many levels, one of which being that my daughter sure could have applied! I wonder if it would be too much work/financial outlay for you to get ahold of the USEA member's list for people 18-35 running P/I and send an email or actual brochure to them letting them know of the availability? If I were you, I'd get out from under the USEA. Obviously, they do not have your best interest at heart. Set the thing up as a 501c3 so it can make money and can accept donations? I hope you can get some more activity going. Again, thanks!

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 03:25 PM
4 Martini...
I personally think it is a great idea..... when I complained back in august that it wasn't being advertised I was told that "it is on the website" and that maybe they could ask her to write something about how its helped her but I have yet to see anything in the eventing magazine. Her year is almost over so not sure what she did with it, but she the first year I think she was 10th or something at Rolex and then this past year she was 1st but unfortunately missed that fence in SJ so apparently she improved alot in two years. I think I saw she is on the winter training list. I have never met her or spoken to her so I don't know.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 03:42 PM
I also want to ad...because someone else said that the YR's have lots of sponsorship??... That they really don't......
I personally donated to Area II's YR's last year so they could get new coats . I met a couple of the moms and it was really neat and a little embarrassing as I am normally kind of shy. They were so excited that someone helped the kids out. One of them showed me pics of her daughter wearing the coat at the Championships. It was really nice to be able to help them. I plan to help again next year it was fun and it is nice they get to keep something to remember the experience. They are really in need of people willing to sponsor things for them. I know last year just travel to get there was hard for them to come up with for everyone and all the horses and their stuff. The kids work really hard to get there. If you or anyone you know wants to donate money to something and wants a rewarding experience I would say to donate to your local Area YR's it is so heartwarming and they are so greatful. I am really glad that my friend who works with them called me and asked because I always thought they had tons of support also...

cevent
Dec. 11, 2007, 05:45 PM
BigRuss- Thanks for explaining the Beacon Charm Grant

I was one of the people who mentioned about the YRs, but I meant that it seems they have more grant opportunities, not sponsorships. I know that last year, Area 1 had really no money for the NAYRC and that the two girls who went had to pay their own way, which as you can imagine was really expensive. That issue of finding sponsorship for the teams for each area is a whole 'nother can of worms!

I know (as mentioned above) that there are some of us (like myself) out there that don't have the financial ability to reach prelim or intermediate whether we have the right horse or not, so that we have the opportunity to apply for grants like yours. I believe that it would be great to have something like the Beacon Charm that is for riders who are competing at the training level who need help with traveling costs, entries and clinics/lessons so that they have the chance to continue on to Prelim and above. Something like the Worth the Trust scholarship, but that includes competition expenses, not just educational purposes. I'm not saying you should change your grant by any means, I just wish something like it was available for people like myself.

Thanks for bringing this all up and asking for everyones imput! I had never heard of the Beacon Charm Grant, nor the Worth the Trust scholarship that I am now planning on applying for the 2009 year.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 06:00 PM
Cevent....I am glad I opened this can of worms too....and who knows maybe if we do end up making our grant its own 501c3 and we get it invested and it grows we can look into branching off to the lower levels. I really do know how hard some people have to work to do this sport and I know how long it takes to make a horse even just to Training level. My parents made me make all my own horses they didn't believe you learned horsemanship by being handed a made horse. I had to learn to do it all and to this day I take care of my own horses every day from stall cleaning to training to vet care. Horses are not getting any cheaper either so the grants need to I think grow with the cost of living to be useful. I have alot of respect for the people out there who work full time some have two jobs and they somehow find time to ride and get a horse ready for an event some even have two. I have had to ride up to 15 horses a day at times but I always think of it as a priviledge even when the horses are less then desireable because I know somewhere someone would trade with me in a minute.

CookiePony
Dec. 11, 2007, 08:57 PM
I just did a Google search on the Beacon Charm grant and it came up with very little... it needs WAY more publicity! You and your family must be pretty frustrated. Given all that USEA has on their plate right now, I think a separate foundation might be the way to go. I wonder if that is how the Dressage Foundation got started.

tuppysmom
Dec. 11, 2007, 09:39 PM
Well, there are YRs and then there are young riders. By that, I mean that some riders who are in that age group but do not participate in the young rider rider program for various reasons.

A young person who strikes out on their own as a professional has fewer grants available to them than the AAs or the Yrs in the YR program. They are working hard at making their own horses, they usually have no owners to pay the bills, they may get some help in the way of discounted feed or equipment, but for the most part they are hacking it out on their own dollars. I feel that a certain amount of struggle is good for ones personal development, but there comes a time where the financial burden is just too heavy. It would be wonderful if there was a grant program to shore up some of these young professionals and keep them in the sport until they are BNRs attracting BN sponsors.

BigRuss1996
Dec. 11, 2007, 10:24 PM
Ours is that grant.... and WHY didn't Sarah apply this year??!!! I even lowered the age this year to accomodate her age group!! I figured since so many of the younger ones went to Rolex this year it was worth doing and not one applied!




Well, there are YRs and then there are young riders. By that, I mean that some riders who are in that age group but do not participate in the young rider rider program for various reasons.

A young person who strikes out on their own as a professional has fewer grants available to them than the AAs or the Yrs in the YR program. They are working hard at making their own horses, they usually have no owners to pay the bills, they may get some help in the way of discounted feed or equipment, but for the most part they are hacking it out on their own dollars. I feel that a certain amount of struggle is good for ones personal development, but there comes a time where the financial burden is just too heavy. It would be wonderful if there was a grant program to shore up some of these young professionals and keep them in the sport until they are BNRs attracting BN sponsors.

tuppysmom
Dec. 11, 2007, 11:35 PM
Well, The last that I knew your generous grant was for riders older than Sara. We were waiting until next year, when she's of the correct, as I thought, age.

eventing addict
Dec. 13, 2007, 10:30 AM
Please consider the 20ish crowd trying to get established at professionals. There are already a couple of grants available for young adult amateurs. But for those of us who did not (for whatever reason, in a lot of cases college) participate in YR it is hard to get started and afford training and competing while trying to establish ourselves. :D

lineaweaver
Feb. 18, 2008, 08:32 AM
I found this posting after Googling "2008 Beacon Charm Grant". You're right - it is not easy to find info on your grant, and hardest on the US Eventing website! In fact the most thorough information was contained in the exchanges resulting from this initial posting. I am intriqued by your comment on "...working students or riders who have never heard of most of the grants available to them". Beacon Charm is the only grant I have been able to find. If there are others, how does one find them? And in response to your initial posting, the jump from seasonal Area competition to year-round training and competition in different Areas, thence to FEI level competition, is financially staggering, if not prohibitive, for any rider's family of modest means. Being relatively new to the horse world, I am astounded at the complete (with the sole exception of your grant, to my experience so far) lack of any form of financial assistance for riders who need it.
And this in an environment of extraordinary affluence. Do you stand alone in recognizing the need?

IfWishesWereHorses
Feb. 18, 2008, 03:15 PM
Personally I would think that the ones who need it most are the ones with all the talent in the world, but withouh the family support. We all know them..the kids who are working and going to school just to support their horsey habit with no help from their parents.

Those are the ones who need grants/support, not the ones who age out and now have to pay for it themselves rather than having their parents pay for it.


Many times talented riders with good horses, give up as it all just gets too hard trying to work, ride, go to school etc.

They are the ones that I'd want to help (but hey, Im broke, so no good for anything lol!)

magnolia73
Feb. 18, 2008, 03:34 PM
Young, local professionals- talented people, committed to the work of the sport, showing talent, needing that great horse.

Young Riders? Go off to college, decide the lifestyle isn't for them. Established pros? Have a base of support. I think it is fairly easy for a good, talented young rider to make the step to local pro- teaching BN and N, training lower level horses etc. It's just hard to get to that next step.

nc_eventer
Feb. 18, 2008, 11:20 PM
The only way I am able to compete or board my horse for that matter is teaching. I have about 10-12 students: 1@N, 1@BN, and the range of beginners from there. But even trying to do that while balancing a husband in the Army ( which means we move A LOT) and a 2 year old is daunting. I have aspirations of competing at Rolex by the time I am 38 ( I am 26). If I think about the financial aspects too hard I get discouraged, but nonetheless that is my goal.
We are prepping for Prelim and the AEC's this year hoping it will give me more to go on. I will make it to the ULs, that is something I know for sure. How long it takes for me to get there......I guess we'll see. I don't know if there are more people like me out there, but the benefit of a grant for lessons, clinics, workshops, etc. would be invaluable to helping me and others like me reach the next step. I choose the life of a "professional" despite its hardships, because that is what I do best- teach and ride. The AA's, the not so young YR's, and the local pro's are the middle children of eventing ;)

Foxtrot's
Feb. 19, 2008, 01:06 AM
I don't have a suggestion but my comment is: if a grant goes to a worthy, needy candidate - a person with the drive and talent and desire to do the horse thing - you will never know how truly it is appreciated. Many young athletes are desperate. Many cannot continue because of financial constraints, dreams dashed. The generosity of supporters is life changing at certain critical times.
I believe, eventually, what goes around comes around and somewhere along the line that athlete will pay back to society.