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ellebeaux
Nov. 15, 2007, 10:10 PM
Hey, help me figure out what I need to support my budding eventing habit. I envision that I will be leasing or buying a horse then keeping it at a small eventing stable somewhere in Virginia. I'm not going to buy a truck or trailer, but hope to lean on the kindness of fellow boarders in exchange for contributing to costs to go to schooling and shows. Is that reasonable?

So figure, board, lessons, training, show fees, vet bills etc.

In addition, I'd like regular lessons and training for my horse. Do you think $1000/month is too high, too low, ridiculous? It's been almost 20 years since I had a horse, costing me no more than $150/month for everything. I am a big fan of pasture board.

I figure $5000 for an older lower level horse to get me started. Then if I'm any good at it, I'd figure out how to move up.

Thanks!

B.

purplnurpl
Nov. 15, 2007, 10:34 PM
how much is board?
how much is a private lesson?
Do you want weekly lessons?
How much is the horse's training?
Leave budget for supplement, especially if you are looking at a seasoned horse.

I say closer to 2K.
and factor in the extra cost of gas for travel to and from the barn!

***********
my eventing budget goes on the credit card. It's bottomless...sort of (rolling eyes)

I buy lots of supplement.
Oil
Yucca or Devil's Claw
flax
Multi vitamin
biotin
joint supp

he lives at home so I buy feed not board

Factor in equipment costs

My training costs are small.
say at the most 100 a month.

but I hit a HT each month. ~$600

I easily spend a grand each month.

texaseventer
Nov. 15, 2007, 10:35 PM
I say take Purpl's number and then add the X factor! :) I seem to be coming up with lots of X-tras lately that I didn't budget for!!!

:)

ellebeaux
Nov. 15, 2007, 10:39 PM
Geez you guys, are you serious??? Holy guacamole. Well, I'm going to do it somehow...

badawg
Nov. 15, 2007, 10:47 PM
Well, I try not to look too hard at my budget, but I suspect that my eventing budget (durting show season) approaches $1000/month. But, I try to save during the off season, and I plan my whole season in the off season. I do very minimal training, and work off most of my lessons. But, yeah, a HT probably runs me about $500, plus board $300, plus shoeing $85, plus extras...Sheesh. Like I said, I try not to look at the numbers!

FLeckenAwesome
Nov. 16, 2007, 01:03 AM
my hubby gave me a $300 a month allowance to see how it would work. Just on the fun stuff.... not care or shoes or vet bills or feed or anything. basically just lessons and showing.... yeah... didn't go over so well at all. i think i used that much in just the first week! well, it depends on if/how often i showed, but...yeah.....


aside from the necessities...
say one lesson a week, $30-$60: that's $180
one HT a month: $400 or so... not counting gas, hotel expenses, food, etc
that's almost $600 JUST on lessons and one rec. show. add in feed, board, trailering, hotels, shoes, etc.

really..... my check book goes like this.... feed store, tack store, trainer, chiro, phone bill, farrier, trainer, schooling fee, show fee, electric bill, farrier, chiro, etc.... it's really really sad how MUCH we spend. and i keep my guys at home!!!

but it's just sooooooo addictive!!! but yeah... plan on spending LOTS!

course if you're frugal and have good self-control, you might just be able to do it :)
good luck and have fun!! just plan on ramen noodles for awhile ;)

thumbsontop
Nov. 16, 2007, 06:36 AM
$500 board
$100 farrier (average, 6 week shoeing)
$100 vet (just in case)
$260 lessons (we pay $65 per week in NoVa w/a good trainer)
$150 1 recognized event per month (one a month during season-leaves extra)
$100 things you "need" (easy to spend!)
______
$1200

Once you get started, print out the Pony Club Record Book. It's simple, and a good way to keep track. That way you can adjust your budget when you find out what's realistic.

PiedPiper
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:00 AM
Oh my god we are suppose to have a budget!?!

I guess mine is when the money in my account runs out. :winkgrin:

I will copy thumbsontop:

$350 field board (for the horse competing)
$220 farrier (average, 4 week shoeing)
$100 vet (just in case) Just did injections so with flexions and then injections it was about 300.00.
$480 lessons (I pay $65 per week, per trainer, and get one lesson each a week-roughly)
$330 (2 HT a month but this varies as some months have more and some have less to none)
$100 things you "need" (easy to spend!)
______
$1580

I also have two other horses, one retired one trying to figure out what he wants to do, so my money floats around where it is needed.

Goodness, I hope my husband doesn't read this thread. :lol:

RiverBendPol
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:35 AM
When I was a teenager, (late 1960's) my dad had just died and my mother was supporting my horse addiction. (1 horse with whom I did Jumpers) One day I got home from school to find Mum at her desk with her head in her hands and piles of papers all over everywhere. She was quite obviously distressed. She looked up at me with a look of horror in her eyes and said, "I have just done something I will NEVER do again." I was shocked. She went on to explain she had just added up all the horse expenses from the last year!

I learned a very important lesson that day. There is no horse budget because just when you think you have it figured out you will get a vet bill that will knock your socks off or your towing vehicle will need some huge repairs or the price of gas will double. Don't budget, just spend thill the money's gone!:eek:

c_expresso
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:38 AM
It is easier to do every two months...

Board: $800
Weekly lesson for 8 weeks: $400
Shoes Every two months-ish [my horse has hardy feet... knock on wood]: $150
Two horse trials: $400
Whatever else: $200

Well, mine works out to be about 1k a month... but I work off some of my board and get basically free trailering to shows.

deltawave
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:45 AM
I keep my horses at home, truck and trailer are paid for, so those don't factor in as far as a "monthly dollar amount" goes, although of course it costs to keep them. Just not as much as boarding! :)

I generally, in a good year, go to 4-5 HTs, maybe 1-2 local jumper shows. All of the HTs except one require traveling at least 150 miles, some of them up to 350 miles. They are all at least 2-day affairs except one local (150 miles) one that I sometimes go to.

My husband travels so much that we have a gozillion hotel points--so rarely do I have to pay for a hotel. Strike that from the tally.

So removing hotel, truck and trailer, board fees, I don't use a trainer at shows, and I'm left with entry fees and fuel.

A typical HT will cost $250-300 with stabling for one horse. Add fuel at $3/gallon and a truck that gets 15mpg = anywhere from $60 - $200 for fuel. That's around $500 for one show.

NOW add back the cost of keeping the horses: roughly $120/month each, soup to nuts. And I have to get a horse-sitter to watch the ones that stay home when I show: $40/day.

I take lessons once a week: $120-150/month.

My horse is going in training this winter: $700/month.

Ai, this is too depressing! ;)

pegasusmom
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:53 AM
RiverBendPol - can I pass your words of wisdom on to my husband!?

Having just sat down in one of those forced family fun conferences, and being mindful that the YP is headed toward a 1* next season. . .

No board - horse is at home
Farrier - $125 every five weeks
Feed - $70 for grain, hay. . . jeez Louise! at approximately one ton per month for 5 horses (I hope!) I figure roughly $85 per horse per month
Supplements - around $110 per month (includes a monthly adequan dose)
Lesson - two per week at $60 each - $480
Total - $870

About once a quarter:
Chiro as needed - $75
Weird body guy as needed - $100

Horse Trials - $600 per horse trial is a good guestimate - and we have about 6-8 on the radar screen for the spring.

PLUS truck payment, trailer payment (just ordered a new one WITH living quarters - no more $125 hotel rooms or board bills for the greyhounds!!), miscellaneous vet garbage, appropriate riding attire for a still growing 17 year old boy, truck maintainence, GAS (here in NC diesel is currently $3.35 a gallon), plus the oh s%$t factor. . . . it is staggering.

I try not to add it up too often, especially since MY only indulgence is a once a month trip to Monique's House of Nails for a pedicure.

On the other hand, I don't have the bail bondsman on speed dial, I'm not paying for a shrink, and my son is healthy, happy, physically fit, outside learning valuable life lessons, and not inside exercising his thumbs with a Game Boy.

Don't look - just enjoy!!

yellowbritches
Nov. 16, 2007, 08:07 AM
If you are talking NOVA when you say Virginia, I will say that $1000 is not going to get you far, if you are considering just about everything (board, training/lessons, vet,farrier, schooling costs, and shows). If you want training for your horse, $1000 will more or less cover board and training (ex: our full training is $1125- that's 6 schools a week and some lessons. "Half" training is $925). If you are going to do just board and no training, plan to spend anywhere from $300 (field board) to $700 (full board). Individual lessons can vary, but I think the safe range is anything from $50 to $100 (that's Olympic Gold Medalist lessons). Vets are harder to price out, but they have NOVA cost of living expenses, so they aren't cheap. And you can easily spend $150 on shoes. $5000 for an older low level horse, while not un-doable, is on the low end. You can find them, but I would seriously consider giving yourself a bigger budget if you can afford it (I have found some serious packers from $7500-10k, but they ARE older and have usually required a bit of maintenance, meaning more vet bills).

Now, this is all going on NOVA expenses (and not including show...if we're talking USEA events, plan on at least $200 for local events that do not require stabling. Less for unrecognized). I think costs are similar out towards C-Ville, but less toward Richmond and the Southwest. Of course, the further you get away from NOVA, the harder it will be to find an eventing community (though not impossible).

You can do it inexpensively, but you have to be very wise about your decisions. We have a client who does it on a pretty small budget. She won't skimp when it comes to her horse's care and her riding, but she finds ways to caught costs in other places...she sews most of her own britches :eek: and they are all quite lovely!!! :yes:

yellowbritches
Nov. 16, 2007, 08:13 AM
If you are talking NOVA when you say Virginia, I will say that $1000 is not going to get you far, if you are considering just about everything (board, training/lessons, vet,farrier, schooling costs, and shows). If you want training for your horse, $1000 will more or less cover board and training (ex: our full training is $1125- that's 6 schools a week and some lessons. "Half" training is $925). If you are going to do just board and no training, plan to spend anywhere from $300 (field board) to $700 (full board). Individual lessons can vary, but I think the safe range is anything from $50 to $100 (that's Olympic Gold Medalist lessons). Vets are harder to price out, but they have NOVA cost of living expenses, so they aren't cheap. And you can easily spend $150 on shoes. $5000 for an older low level horse, while not un-doable, is on the low end. You can find them, but I would seriously consider giving yourself a bigger budget if you can afford it (I have found some serious packers from $7500-10k, but they ARE older and have usually required a bit of maintenance, meaning more vet bills).

Now, this is all going on NOVA expenses (and not including show...if we're talking USEA events, plan on at least $200 for local events that do not require stabling. Less for unrecognized). I think costs are similar out towards C-Ville, but less toward Richmond and the Southwest. Of course, the further you get away from NOVA, the harder it will be to find an eventing community (though not impossible).

You can do it inexpensively, but you have to be very wise about your decisions. We have a client who does it on a pretty small budget. She won't skimp when it comes to her horse's care and her riding, but she finds ways to caught costs in other places...she sews most of her own britches :eek: and they are all quite lovely!!! :yes:

kdail
Nov. 16, 2007, 08:48 AM
Jeepers, creepers! You guys are going to scare her to death! Let's think about it. You're just starting out, on a lower level, steady eddie guy, after time off from riding. Bravo for getting back into the sport, by the way. For your first year your goals may be to learn as much as you can, stay safe, and have FUN with your horse as you develop your skills. Aim for local competitions, not USEA recognized, and see if you like it enough to want to spend the extra money for recognized competitions. There are lots of adult amateurs having a blast at schooling horse trials these days (I'm one of those!). Find a good facility and a good trainer. Do you really think you'll want weekly lessons starting out? Try lessons every other week, taking notes after each lesson to help you stay focused on your homework between lessons. Make every lesson count, and audit other lessons any chance you get. You didn't mention whether or not you work full-time, but that may influence how many rides you can get in between your lessons. Build a budget based on your own goals, not based on what others spend. I think you are smart to take a "poll" to see what other folks are spending, for reference purposes. If you've got the moolah, go for it. If your budget is slimmer, that's doable, too.

Welcome back!

JanWeber
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:02 AM
You may want to budget for a shipper, just in case you can't find rides to events. When you're really READY to GO and no one has room in their trailer or they're competing at Training/Prelim and you're going BN and it's a different day or they are in the morning and you are late afternoon - make a plan to get there somehow.

bambam
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:08 AM
I make a point of not adding it up :D but wanted to point out a couple of things- it is a very different proposition if you are talking about doing it in NoVa or in New Zealand. I bet it is tons cheaper to do this in New Zealand.
NoVA is an expensive area in the US for things like board, farrier, vet but you will have lots of trainer options (the good ones vary from $50 to $100 for a private these days- cheaper for a group and I suppose there are some who are more but the BNT I ride with sometimes is $65).
Also- NoVa has lots of good unrecongized horse trials which are cheaper and a great way to get started and unless you want to, you do not have to stable at recognized events (the folks saying it costs them $400-500 an event must be including stabling- there are so many events within 2 hours of this area that stabling is not necessary for anything less than a one star).
So yes, you can easily spend a lot but, if you are on a budget, you can do it for less than lots of the numbers being offered here.

Lauren!
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:11 AM
It's really going to depend on what costs in your area are (board, lessons, farrier) and your situation (how many lessons you want/need, any special care the horse requires) but $1000 could be a hard number to get by on depending. I can do it on $1000/month, but that's doing almost everything myself and just paying for board (and mine is cheap! I'm very lucky) and basic care (assuming no vet bills), some lessons, fuel (have truck/trailer, not counting in cost and maintenece), and entries. I could easily spend $2000 at a fancier barn with an indoor and with more lessons and coaching. You may also have to factor in coaching at events (great to have, not always possible for me), trailering, etc. Make a list and fill in your own anticipated costs based on the ideas from this thread and you should have a better idea. Good Luck :)

Invested1
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:12 AM
I make a point of not adding it up :D

Ditto! I started adding it up one time and nearly passed out! Then I figured I'm not having to live off of ramen noodles and peanut butter, and my horse stuff makes me happy, so I'm just going to stay in my blissfully ignorant state (seems to be a trend with me lately! :lol:) and ignore how much it costs. :D

curlykarot
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:25 AM
O gosh - a budget. I hate thinking about how much I spend!

I am just starting out with my guy - he is 5 never shown before I got him and before this year - I had about a 5 year hiatus from showing and riding consistantly. So here is what I think I spend, although it is probably more. (I live in MD about 1/2 hr from Leesburg, VA)

$325 (field board)
$105 (3 lessons /month @ $35 each)
$85 (farrier every 6 weeks - 2 fronts)
$100 (misc. Vet - that can always go up)
$100 (stuff just to buy - that can always go up)
$200 (rec. HT/ 1 a month/ no stabling)
$50 (trailering to show, varies, all shows less than 2 hrs away)
_____
$965


This fall we started showing and have only done unrecg. shows. So the entries were more around $100.

What also helps is that I've got a great trainer/BO who knows what it is like to be on a very tight budget and try to succeed in this sport. So sometimes the opprotunity does arrive for me to work off lessons.

ellebeaux
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:33 AM
You guys are so awesome and I'm glad I found you :)

Okay, I have a lot to think about but it's almost lesson time so I gotta go ride!

have a great day,

B.

Mustang51
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:38 AM
I would think 1000 per month is not too unreasonable for just getting started. As others have said it depends greatly on board/farrier/vet/training costs. But you can hopefully find a horse for the lower levels that's not toooo high maintainence so FIELD board, normal shoeing and routine vet (ha!! right, is there such a thing?) should be possible. And in NOVA/MD at least there are lots of events close enough that you dont need to stable, and can find some unrec. events too.
I did just do a rough budget for myself (as I needed to determine what appartment I could afford to move into). And I'm really hoping to stay around 1700-1800/month with my horse. But thats for one season at prelim, stall board, and significant vet maintainence. So I would hope if you're not aiming for a 1* just yet that you could manage for less!
But you also have to keep in mind that ANY horse can rack up a multi-thousand $$ vet bill in DAYS. So, you need to be sure you can absorb that shock if neccessary.

mythical84
Nov. 16, 2007, 09:55 AM
I agree with others ... don't add it up!

But since you asked, here's my monthly budget for my green N/T gelding ...
board: $325 (modified field board)
vet: $150
farrier: $150
insurance: mine averages to about $60/month for the gelding
weekly lessons: $180
shows: $200

And I will tell you that I spend much more than this. Harry has craptastic feet and is currently in $150/a piece glue-on shoes for the fronts. The vet stuff has averaged out, but insurance is key here. The only reason I was able to afford GastroGard and a recent VEI visit was because of insurance. In my opinion it is well worth the money.

I also braid/ride/teach as a side-job, so basically any money I make outside of my normal paycheck goes to the horses.

InVA
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:03 AM
I start with nothing and end up $5000 in the hole...
I thought everyone did that?

Horseless1
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:08 AM
After over a decade off from riding I've been creeping back into eventing for three years now. I've been doing it in stages without a huge outlay of cash up front.

I found a trainer with an old competition horse that I rode in lessons once a week to start. Then I moved up to a partial lease for four days a week to get my fitness/skills back. Then I moved to a full lease for the season. I paid the trainer to trailer me to events. Now after taking the baby steps I'm looking for my own horse.

It worked very well for me because I didn't have to buy a BN/Novice horse only to trade up in a year. And I got to test it all out to see if it was doable financially. I still haven't added up the total cost (scared) but it's substantial - I estimate at least 2k a month during show season. Board is $900. Shoes with studs are $320. Lessons are $80 a week. Trailering is $1.50 a mile. I would say don't plan too much on others' kindness for a ride - usually open spots go fast. And if you do get a ride, plan on paying the person because it costs a lot to buy and maintain a truck and trailer!

One other cost to consider unless your barn has endless jumps is XC schooling - fee to grounds, fee to trainer, fee for trailering.

Good luck and have fun!

snoopy
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:09 AM
nothing anymore....:(

zagafi
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:10 AM
***sticks fingers in ears***

La, la, la...I can't heaaaarrr youuuuu.

purplnurpl
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:14 AM
so no one can complain...

My start:
Old mare pulls suspensory. 2 K down the drain.
Old mare comes back and then shoulder goes out = retirement.

New Young Prospect purchased for 2K.
Young Prospect lame and finished within 1 month at age 4. Vet costs 1K.
New young prospect PPE. $550
and additional purchase fee (upon returning 1st prospect) 1K
Within one week new horse tries to cut off his leg 1K.


So I started with nothing and was $7500.00 in the hole.

And then I started with the additional said costs! whoopie.

oh, new saddles for new horse. $5500.00. still paying those off, along with the 2K bone scan from January 2007.

rolling eyes.

please go to Boomtime.com to offer sponsorship support.

MTshowjumper
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:17 AM
I was a working student in VA so I worked a lot of this off, but this is what it would have cost otherwise. I don't usually get to do an event every month, but for this I assumed I would:

N. Virginia-
$700 Stall Board no pasture board offered
$600 Lessons ($75 lesson x2 a week with Olympian)
$150 Shoes
$200 An Event
$150 Vet (At least, it is usually more all things considered)
=$1800 month

Vs. South Carolina where I live now:
$300 Stall Board or $170 pasture
$200 Lessons ($50 lesson 1x week with 4* rider or GP Dressage rider)
$60 Shoes
$400 Event (Farther away so I have to get stabling and hotel)
$100 Vet (Less exspensive here)
=$760 month
……and that would be why I moved :).

As for $5000 for an older lower level horse it would be doable if you where looking at a novice type horse or a much older training level horse since the market is down right now.

rothmpp
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:21 AM
I have a question for all of you that keep your horses at home... Hay is really expensive this year due to the drought (at least $5/bale for halfway decent grass hay), and when I add the rest of the costs together when my horses are at home including electricity for the fence, barn, and water heaters, shavings ($4/bag), grain, barn and fence maintenance, etc... I figured that it was costing me about $10/day per horse. How are you keeping your horses at home for $125 per month?

I just had to do this with DH to justify boarding thru the winter. When I added on the ability to ride all winter in an indoor, it was a no brainer to me (and finally to him). I found a decent small barn with good care and a nice indoor for $400/month, just slightly more that keeping the young horse at home.

pegasusmom
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:22 AM
Invested - what's wrong with ramen and peanut butter??:lol::lol:

Our expenses have increased now that we are supporting a horse and rider with an eye toward rarified air, but it is always good to be informed!

I think.

Roney
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:28 AM
I'm Miss Anne L. Retentive when it come to budgeting ;) so I know EXACTLY what the horse habit has cost me since I bought my horse two years ago.

This year, with the RIDICULOUSLY high full board in MA (sob sob), my average monthly costs for "horse care" only (board, shoes, vet, supps, etc.) is $1258, including one very large vet bill mid-year.

Training has been running me $215 a month (lessons, clinics, training rides).

Shows vary, but run about me around $200 - $250 each, with trailering and training. So I haven't been doing too many of those. :sigh:

I do think it's a good idea to sit down and do a budget if you're thinking about getting into it more deeply. It will help you be realistic about what you can and want to do without having the thugs come around threatening to break your knees!

Ilex
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:34 AM
I couldn't really tell from reading you post if you are currently riding?

To save money....I would find a barn somewhere that has school horses and spring for 3 lessons a week. Maybe two group and one private. That way if you have not ridden regularly for a while you can get your seat secure again and start jumping. And you will not have to worry about taking care of the horse. You will be surprised at the progress you will make w/three lessons a week.

Then look for the horse.

Cutting costs:

Find something w/GREAT feet. That will save a ton on the farrier costs.

Stay away from the tack store ... LOL! Only buy the absolute necessities. I bought a Rambo blanked on clearance 8 years ago. I'm still using it ... it has a couple of patches. My coolers have patches. I wipe down my tack after every ride. My two stable blankets are 6 years old (one patched, one not). I do buy very good quality tack. It's usually expensive.....but I take very good care of it so it lasts a looooong time.

You can also save some money by deciding: lessons vs competitions. Based on your goals. You can talk to who ever you are riding with. And be honest. Say my budget is $ per year w/ $ going to monthly horse upkeep. So I have $ to spend on lessons and competitions. With .....blah blah blah..... being my riding goals.

Most instructors will totally get that. And help you come up w/a plan to make your goals a reality w/your budget.

I would be thrilled w/a $1000 per month budget. Mine is significantly less.

LookinSouth
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:36 AM
Jeepers, creepers! You guys are going to scare her to death! Let's think about it. You're just starting out, on a lower level, steady eddie guy, after time off from riding. Bravo for getting back into the sport, by the way. For your first year your goals may be to learn as much as you can, stay safe, and have FUN with your horse as you develop your skills. Aim for local competitions, not USEA recognized, and see if you like it enough to want to spend the extra money for recognized competitions. There are lots of adult amateurs having a blast at schooling horse trials these days (I'm one of those!). Find a good facility and a good trainer. Do you really think you'll want weekly lessons starting out? Try lessons every other week, taking notes after each lesson to help you stay focused on your homework between lessons. Make every lesson count, and audit other lessons any chance you get. You didn't mention whether or not you work full-time, but that may influence how many rides you can get in between your lessons. Build a budget based on your own goals, not based on what others spend. I think you are smart to take a "poll" to see what other folks are spending, for reference purposes. If you've got the moolah, go for it. If your budget is slimmer, that's doable, too.

Welcome back!

I agree completely. Not everyone has a 1k or 2k budget to compete in low level eventing. I certainly do not :D. IF there is a will there is a way to make it work.
I recommend leasing a well trained, safe, school master type older horse that you can really learn on and most of all ENJOY riding. If you take your time you can probably find one for the lower levels that won't require a fortune in maintenance either. My horse is 16 and I spend well under a 100.00/month on supplements.
It doesn't matter how much you have to spend on lessons/training etc..if you don't have a well trained and willing horse that you as the rider can learn on it is going to be much harder to reach your goals as an amateur with limited means. To me the horse is the most important part. Leasing will allow you to hopefully get "more horse" for your money and determine what it is you really want as a horse owner in the future.

I am also just starting out in low level eventing. I only did unrecognized HT's this year and focused most of my budget on lessons and slowly acquiring the equipment I needed. I tried to get the most out of my lessons by focusing on schooling what I worked on in my lessons at home regularly. This allowed me to go to my next lesson having improved and able to move on to something else. I took a lesson once a week with an eventing trainer. We focused on Stadium and Dressage since XC is our best area. When my trainer had group XC lessons at various venues I took advantage of that to school my horse over new questions.

Next year I plan to do a few recognized at the BN level. Fortunately Area I has many recognized HT's that are easily within a 1.5 hr drive so no overnights.
I have a pretty tight budget compared to others on this board and this year I met every goal I set with my limited budget.

snoopy
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:43 AM
[QUOTE=rothmpp;2807901]I have a question for all of you that keep your horses at home... Hay is really expensive this year due to the drought (at least $5/bale for halfway decent grass hay), and when I add the rest of the costs together when my horses are at home including electricity for the fence, barn, and water heaters, shavings ($4/bag), grain, barn and fence maintenance, etc... I figured that it was costing me about $10/day per horse. How are you keeping your horses at home for $125 per month?
QUOTE]



I would be VERY interested to hear some responses to this...was JUST going through the same thing!!!!:confused:

mellsmom
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:44 AM
You all get to have training????

I have mine in the back yard, and out of my salary pay for all their feed, supplements, farrier , vet, etc. I can MAYBE have one lesson every other month at 40 -50. I can do a couple of shows a year. Like maybe 7. Less next year as I'll no longer be doing CT with my horse, just dressage and frankly I was doing to VA Horse Trials series and getting the year and champion award the last two fall fest seasons, which allowed me to show with them. I have never been able to afford to do a recognized event. My truck and trailer are paid for now, but with insurance, etc. I just don't have the money. And I use my entire salary for the horse thing. I need a new job I guess.

My hay runs abot $5 a bale and I'm feed 1 1/2 bales a day all year.
Feed is $25 every week and 1/2.
Shoes $200 every 5 weeks.
Vet ... maybe $200 a month (includes shots and random lameness/chiro)
Supplements $125 a month
Fly control in the summer $50 a month easily.

I'm in central Va, this does not count the equity line I took out to build the barn or fertilizer and grass seed, etc.

Catalina
Nov. 16, 2007, 10:48 AM
I have four horses that live out 24/7, two of which I event. I absolutely refuse to figure out exactly how much a month I spend on them because if I knew, I would probably lose my mind :eek:. The cost of my hay just went up over 50%, which is really ouchy, but, I don't take lessons regularly in the winter, so the cost is somewhat offset. I am in the 'ignorance is bliss' camp :).

ThirdCharm
Nov. 16, 2007, 11:11 AM
IF I was boarding at the barn that I own, didn't have a trailer/truck, and hadn't married a farrier, this is what it WOULD cost me for one horse:

$400 Stall Board
$130 Lessons ($65 lesson x2 a month w/ULR rider)
$120 Shoes
$200 Rec. Event
$100 Unrec. Event
$100 Vet
$100 (stuff)
$150 (trailering to shows, most rec shows 2+ hrs away, most unrec. < hr)
_____

$1300

Not that I really 'save' by having my own farm/trailer/truck/farrier (gotta pay mortgage, insure truck, make trailer payments, and cook dinner every night!) but at least I can write it off and afford to have more than one horse (and sometimes even compete more than one!).

Jennifer

ThirdCharm
Nov. 16, 2007, 11:23 AM
I have a question for all of you that keep your horses at home... Hay is really expensive this year due to the drought (at least $5/bale for halfway decent grass hay), and when I add the rest of the costs together when my horses are at home including electricity for the fence, barn, and water heaters, shavings ($4/bag), grain, barn and fence maintenance, etc... I figured that it was costing me about $10/day per horse. How are you keeping your horses at home for $125 per month?.


If I just had one horse at home:
4 bags alfalfa cubes: $40
4 bags Nutrena Ultra: $64
10 bales hay: $35 (same supplier for five years, and he didn't screw me over and
stocked me up before winter so I should not have to buy hay if I
keep doing alfalfa cubes in the AM)_
Shoes: $0 (learned to do myself after marrying farrier!)
Vet: $20 maybe? (very healthy knock on wood)
Shavings: $15 ($160 truckload, lasts a month for 13 horses)
Electricity: $10 ($90 month, but 13 horses)

That's $184, but if I had any grass I maybe wouldn't need to do alfalfa cubes, at least not on my Prelim horse who is an easy keeper.

If the horse is an easy keeper, lives on pasture, and is barefoot, it can be done..... what are the odds.....

Jennifer

texaseventer
Nov. 16, 2007, 11:47 AM
Having read all these posts - my favorite is the LA LA LA LA LA with fingers stuck in the ears!!!! I guess I've subscribed to the "don't look" theory with my "budgeting" for the horse.

Ellebeaux, like you, I'm just coming back to the sport after a 7 year hiatus. I'm amazed how much STUFF I need :)

But since I AM TRYING to be better w/ money :)... (Keep in mind this "budget" has been going up and up since Dover Saddlery opened a location less than 10 mins from my office, dammit.... :)

Board (incl lessons) $525
Farrier $100 (6 wks)
Random vet $75 (average it out)
Clinics $100/month (average it out over the year, bulk of them in the off season

Recognized show - I just did my first USEA show
Entry & Stabling $201 (it was a 1 day format)
Gas $75
hotel $30 (split /3)

Random tack - $100 month ... at least. I just had to buy a new jumping saddle. That's what my credit card is for. :)

Those are just the costs I can "see", the "X" factor I talked about earlier is the bottomless pit. There's always SOMETHING that I need to get, or some clinic I REALLY want to go to, etc etc etc.

But even though I eat a lot of frozen dinners on sale instead of real (read: more expensive) food;) It's totally worth EVERY PENNY and every credit card bill!! LOL I wouldn't trade it for anything.

Welcome back to the sport! You are just as crazy as I am, apparently. :) :) :) Yay for us!

Mandy

flypony74
Nov. 16, 2007, 12:41 PM
There may be some months where I spend $1k on things, but it is rare. I keep my horses at home, they live out 24/7 for the most part (so negligible shavings $$), and I have a truck and trailer that are paid for.

Soooo.....for my one who that I currently compete:

• Board- $0
• Feed- less than $10/month (eats 1/2 lb ration balancer 1x day)
• Supplements- $25/month
• Hay- varies, as I feed none in the summer, but lots in the winter. If I average it across the board, based on what I have bought and stored in my barn, it would average $25/month (or 300/year...I bought some very good hay inexpensively this spring)
• Farrier- $25-$65 every six weeks (he is barefoot about 6-9 months of the year, and fronts only the rest of the time)
• Vet- average $25/month (figuring $300/year...he is pretty low maintenance)

Basic care, worst case scenario= $150/month

I will be starting my horse on a chiro schedule soon, so add $75 every 4-6 weeks.

Horse Trials:
In a good year I would expect to do 3-5 recognized events each year (most within a 4-6 hour drive, some closer), 2-3 unrecognized, plus some local H/J or dressage schooling shows. My horse is still a little green, and we have some fabulous unrecognized events that we like to go to, so no point in spending big bucks on recognized all the time. Also, I don't compete every single month....pretty much April through October or November.

Also, I ride with a group of ladies all the time, and we all lesson and travel together, so we split expenses on a lot of things (fuel, hotel, group lessons instead of private all the time, etc), which eases the financial hit. We always carpool to shows and alternate whose rig we take, so that reduces wear and tear on our vehicles.

Lessons- $35/week= $140/month
Horse Trial Entries/Stabling (figuring 3 recognized and 3 unrecognized, which is plenty for me)- $1350, averages to $112.50/month
Fuel- who knows? Figure $100 per event, average $50/month
Lodging- About $50 per event (since there are always several to share a room), so average $25/month
Tack and Incidentals- average maybe $40/month. I already have all of the tack I need, so this is just in case something wears out or breaks, need to try a different bit, etc.

Horse Trials= $367.50/month

So, spread over a 12 month period, I spend approximately $517.50/month on care expenses and horse trials. Like I said before, I don't compete every month, but if you budget the same amount every month regardless, then those less expensive months just build up funds in the farm account for the months where expenses are greater. This sport is expensive, but you don't have to do a horse trial every weekend or ride with the most expensive trainer multiple times a week to have fun at the lower levels. I did it on a MUCH tighter shoestring budget when I was in college.

I do keep a separate savings account for emergencies...the expenses about are the recurring expenses.

FLeckenAwesome
Nov. 16, 2007, 12:56 PM
invested: i like your style :)
i also live in my own little world :) hollyland... it's full of unicorns and puppies and appaloosas! and yeah...people always want to get me something for ME for xmas and i tell them nooooo, i just want horse stuff. it's so much more fun. :)

but yeah... i agree. you can make it work and just work your way up to it. as long as you can afford board... you can work off lessons, audit,
and there are plenty of local schooling shows that are cheap and just as much fun as the big shows, until you decide to spend the money on the big shows. we have tons of shows that are $20 for a dressage test, or $75 for a three phase, etc.

have fun!!!

Fence2Fence
Nov. 16, 2007, 01:38 PM
Well, I'm a budgeting fool.

Answering the question about keeping horses at home:

The tractor, truck, and horse trailer are paid off, but there are various maintence costs and that gets accounted for differently. I do my own maintence unless it's something beyond my basic skill. The horse trailer and tractor are less than 2 years old, the truck on the other hand has 185k miles on it. It's been taken care of and runs superb.

I have Wonderful pastures and plenty of room for my 2 guys and little mini. They spend atleast 12 hours outside every day, and that hay/grain/bedding costs down. When the weather is nice, they get to stay out a little more. While the hay I bought isn't super large bales, it's very high quality, and bought at an unbeatable price of $3 a bale. I found a local farmer who raises hay, and I just drive my truck over and he helps me load it onto the back of the truck. 200 bales easily lasts a year and except for the mini, each of them get a huge pile of hay to munch on when they are inside. Most of the hay is fed during the winter. I have sawdust delivered by the dump-truck load ($225) and that should last me about nine months to a year.

I don't feed much grain, but I do feed Triple Crown products. I measure it each time I feed. It averages about $24 a month. The horses are still fat and shiny though.

I don't feed supplements; I think being outside does them more good. (I'm going to start feeding AC-One to my one critter since we recently determined he's a partial non-sweater.)

Lessons run $50 to $80 depending on which trainer I work with. Since I'm just recently back to taking lessons, I generally take two lessons a month. I plan to start taking weekly lessons soon. So that'll run $200 to $300 a month.

Although I haven't shown for a while, except my recent dressage show, I trailer in to shows. Horse Trials are budgeted at $200 for each.

There are hunter jumper shows, dressage shows, etc, than can be done for simple mileage, and I plan on going to those!! Those can be done for less than $100, usually.

Invested1
Nov. 16, 2007, 01:43 PM
Invested - what's wrong with ramen and peanut butter??:lol::lol:

:lol: Nothing--love them both! Just not 3 meals a day.....every day. :lol:

Invested1
Nov. 16, 2007, 01:46 PM
invested: i like your style :)

Thanks! :D

Foxygrl516
Nov. 16, 2007, 03:26 PM
I know there are already 3 pages of budgets here for the OP to look through, but I feel like I should chime in. :) I think if I had read this thread before buying my eventer, I never would have done it! lol But for me, it's really not that hard! It can be done!
First of all, I realize living expenses may be a good bit less here in Auburn than in VA, but I feel like I could move anywhere in the country and make my horsie lifestyle work.

I have pasture space (free) at my bf house, but I recently moved my eventer to the barn where I work so that we can train better. He lives out 24/7 and loves it. I don't take lessons as often as most people like to (due to small budget) but unless you are showing a LOT and very competitive, I think a lesson every 2 weeks (or once a week if you must) is plenty as long as you work on homework in between. It's also fun to help your trainer at big shows, grooming and such in exchange for lesson costs. Another thing I do so that shows pay for themselves is braid about 5 or so horses at every HT at $35 a horse. You can earn an entry fee in a Friday night easily! The lesson cost I listed below is an avg spread out over a year. And do realize that misc. costs can be kept down if you are disciplened about it. Also, I payed $4500 for my horse. He was not a "veteran" at all, had done 2 hts w/ no jump penalties, and had a GREAT personality and super manners. Not a packer, but very safe and enjoyable and relatively young at 7yo. I sleep in the LQ of my trailer at shows and think it's kinda a waste of money for me to ever get a hotel. Great way to keep costs down.

I bought my horse for: $4500
Board: $120/mo pasture board with grain
Shoes: ~$46/mo ($85 every 6 wks)
Lessons: avg. ~$35/mo
Shows: *This year I did 3 usea hts and 3 schooling shows*
HT entries- $765/yr or $63.75/mo
SS entries- $300/yr or $25/mo
Misc. costs: ~$50/mo (sometimes a lot more, sometimes 0).
---------
so in general: $339.75/mo for a horse I love, enjoy, and who I believe to have plenty of nice things.

Now, I will admit that there have been several extra purchases that were pretty substantial for me. But, I bought these things when I had the money and felt like I could buy them and pay the bills. I did buy a nice saddle at Rolex for $3600, and a used but wonderful BP trailer w/ living quarters for $3200.

I don't do as much as a lot of people in the sport, but it is possible to survive the sport on $1000 a month. Maybe find a cheaper place to board in exchange for having more money for lessons or shows. Lots of people in area 3 are at almost every show every weekend... that's so expensive! Great if you can do it, but you don't have to! Good luck and don't be intimidated. It'll be great! I would LOVE to have a $1000/mo budget to work with! You'll be great!

Jazzy Lady
Nov. 16, 2007, 03:44 PM
This is going to be bad... ummm

This is in CND $$.

Board: $530 which is awesome considering we have perfect footing, BN-** cross course, 6 sand rings (one of which houses 2 20x60's comfortably), grass stadium ring, huge indoor and wonderful care.
Farrier:$150-250 depending on shoes and pads every 4 weeks because my horse's feet grow like crazy. 5 weeks in the winter.
Vet: depends on various factors. My horses like to destroy themselves so this number is quite high... yikes. Plus I like to keep in touch with my vet and have her check my boy over before major things.
Shows: $150 up here for a show. We ship in for the day (all are one days) and nothing is further than 3 hours away... anything decent within 2 hours. I have my own truck/trailer so add gas. Generally will do 2/month, but moving up to intermediate which means less shows, but more in the US. So add accordingly plus hotel fees... add Florida on top of that....
Supplements, Adequan... add more.
Fall 3-day: $500 or so...
Lessons are $50 a pop. about 6 a month in the winter, twice a week in the summer with **** former team member.

I have the most wonderful parents.

Ilex
Nov. 16, 2007, 04:05 PM
I have a question for all of you that keep your horses at home... Hay is really expensive this year due to the drought (at least $5/bale for halfway decent grass hay), and when I add the rest of the costs together when my horses are at home including electricity for the fence, barn, and water heaters, shavings ($4/bag), grain, barn and fence maintenance, etc... I figured that it was costing me about $10/day per horse. How are you keeping your horses at home for $125 per month?


I'm not at $125....but I'm a little less than $300.

I pay for Obies upkeep....he is a 15 or 16 year old Hannoverian (trying to determine age in another thread lol)

3 bags of Triple Crown $39

1/3 bag of Equi-Min (mineral and salt mix) $7

25 bales of grass hay $70 (don't hate me I have wonderful grass hay bought on contract in the spring for $2.75 a bale)

MSM $9

Guardian Bedding $42 (8 bags ... buy it by the pallet and pay $5.25 a bag... but I was told the price was going to be going up)

Barn $25. We have a seven stall barn and I figure each stall contributes $25 per month to the barn fund (taxes/upkeep/fencing/arena/tractor .. 7x25=175 per month $2100 per yr)

Barefoot trim every 4-5 weeks. $20

That's $187 a month.

And I budget $200 per month.

For my Peggy Sue (Halflinger) She maybe uses up $125 at the most montly. But she is still budgeted at $200 per month.

I always look for easy keepers w/good feet. I never worried about it to much in the past but after spending a fortune keeping feet togeather....I said never again.

ellebeaux
Nov. 16, 2007, 05:03 PM
Thanks to each and every one of you for the thoughtful replies! It's a little surprising but doesn't change my goals. My motto this year is "I'll adapt"!

I'm currently taking lessons 2-3 times a week and just getting my seat back. It's a humbling experience. I haven't even cantered yet! I can't believe it. But today we worked on half circles and reverse half circles and feeling how the horse leans in or out on his weak side. Very cool.

Plus I shovel poop several hours a week in exchange for a lesson. I find it very relaxing and I like just hanging out with the horses.

From my previous riding experience, I learned to always getting a horse that's more experienced than me. I have no desire to raise babies or back horses, though I applaud those who do. My attitude is I'm the boss but I expect the horse to take care of me if we get into trouble. Kinda like I like my men (OMG major psychological breakthrough here!!!).

I am hoping to live in Charlottesville permanently but not for a couple years yet. It really is one of the nicest places I've ever lived. The leaves are astounding this year. And there's so many horse people.

Well, I'm going to go count my pennies. have a great weekend!

Centuree
Nov. 16, 2007, 05:45 PM
Hi Ellebeaux
I don't spend nearly that much money on eventing, and I go to recognized EC events (I am Canadian though, so perhaps it is cheaper down here). I also keep my horses at home, have tons of pasture, and have a few borders that helps float my costs.
120/mo farrier
100/mo hay, grain and pasture
240/mo lessons
= $560 a month. During the show season I would add another $200 per show. (I rarely stable on the premises, and already own a truck and trailer). So, I think your budget can depend a lot on how much you WANT to spend. However, for me, there is NO way I could afford $2000 a month like some people pay. Thats my whole mortgage!

Massage, chiro and supplements are great, but IMO, not necessary.

Whisper
Nov. 16, 2007, 07:17 PM
It sounds like you're really on the right track! Check out the horseless riders/riderless horses thread, and with your instructor, to see if you can find a suitable, experienced horse to part-lease or just ride. :D When I was part-leasing, it ran me about $450-600 per month, depending on whether I was doing 1 or 2 lessons a week, and riding on my own for 3 or 4 days (I did both at various times, but couldn't switch within a given month), and whether or not I did a show that month. I had just switched to a full lease, which cost about $850/month (including 1 unrec. HT per month), but he injured his hoof. His owner wanted to work with her regular vet and farrier, who were out of the area, so we decided to end the lease. Right now, I'm just doing 1 lesson a week (will probably try to go up to 2 after the holidays), vaulting (gymnastics on horseback), and have several horses I get to ride for free on weekends. I feel like I have some work to do before I get back into showing, getting back to basics, and so I'll probably start looking for a part-lease closer to Spring.

thumbsontop
Nov. 16, 2007, 08:58 PM
Owning a horse in Virginia Hunt Country = PRICELESS!

I'm sure there are many that would agree that it's the best place in the country to own a horse! :D

octavian_jazz
Nov. 17, 2007, 02:49 PM
I'm 16 so this thread makes me really grateful for the ones supporting my riding.

Over the summer I payed for all of my entry fees. The beginning of July I had $1200 in my bank account, and by the end of August I had $7. It was all horse related, I spent $300 on new boots, and approximately $200 on other tack related stuf that was badly needed. It was pretty depressing to see my bank account fade away!

$?? - Horses at home, I would have to ask about the cost of everything on a month to month basis
$90 farrier (every 6 weeks)
$400-600 per HT (we travel 2-6 hours for every event, so gas really adds up)
$260 Lessons (1x a week)
$0 Vet (KNOCK ON WOOD)
-------------------------------------------
$750 - $1200

twistoffate
Nov. 17, 2007, 03:20 PM
WOW!! I guess I finally found that there is something beneficial to living in the middle of know where..... We have cattle, horses and raise hay and run the farm as a business so I have to keep track of everything I spend on horses. I have 4 but only one competing...Last year my grand total for the year was $6000. I get about one lesson a month and go to about 5 HT's a year. Maybe I can tell my husband what I could be spending and he would be much happier!!! :) I don't know how you all do it!

glfprncs
Nov. 20, 2007, 11:12 AM
I kept my horse at home with me and my 'rents (I had to live at home until my mid-20s in order to be able to afford a horse), but even though, my expenses weren't cheap. Here's a basic month:

Board--free.
Feed--approx. $100/month for grain and supplements--we baled our own hay, so it was free, since I was in the hayfield for a week.
Lessons--$65 each, usually 4 per month
Travel to lessons--$200--I drove 7 hours round trip to trainer's farm, and would spend the weekend there. He didn't charge for the room, but I did buy food while there.
Horse Trials--usually 1-2 per month @$500 ($200-250--entry and stabling--another $250 for hotel (I shared), food, etc.)--that's on a serious budget.
Farrier--$85 (unless I needed brand new shoes made with clips and stud holes)
Vet--$100 (just add it in just in case)
Tack shop stuff (i.e. fly spray, etc. + all those other things you see while at tack shop)--$100

I'm up to $1395, and that's with no board. I tried to keep track one season of my expenses, and I had gotten to June and spent over $10,000 one year at that point in time (I had gone to Florida for 10 weeks at the beginning of the season, but I was on a budget, worked for trainer, lessons were free, and got a 'deal' on housing and board while there--competed prelim.). I stopped adding it up at that point. It was too depressing...but SO worth every penny.

Candle
Nov. 20, 2007, 11:55 AM
Ookay, I am NOT EVER going to completely add up my horse expenses, so no help there, but I am going to throw out where my thinking goes whenever I start getting palpitations over how much this sport costs.

1 hour of therapy w/o insurance: $60 and up

1 Coach Purse: $698 http://tinyurl.com/278wrp

Manolos (1 pair, you know you can't wear them more than once every two weeks) $625
http://tinyurl.com/yo8fun

Bar Tab For Night Out (Once a week): I'm going to say $60 - $120

Mani & Pedi: $40 weekly, not in expensive area

Cover Charge for Bars/Clubs: $40/week/weekend

DVD's To Watch In Free Time that NonHorse People Have: $18 each, most people who like to buy movies buy about five or six a month. $108

Playstation 3: $399 (fixed expense, one per year, assuming need to keep up with different brands/technologies)

Each Game for Playstation 3: $60 - 80

Haircut & Color: $120 - $200 per month

Gym Membership: $60/month

Personal Trainer: $400/month

I'm not adding any of this up to be snarky, it's just that for us, our personal trainer, therapist, gym membership, personal entertainment, and free time activities are all packaged up in a cute little package that whinnies when you look at it :D And our hair is usually covered by a baseball cap or helmet. So, I don't feel so much like I'm spending outrageous amounts, especially when I contemplate how much my roommates spend each month on tequila shots and club covers alone. I spend less.

NRB
Nov. 20, 2007, 01:23 PM
Hi Ellebeaux, I live about an hour NE of C-ville. If I wanted to get back into eventing on the cheaper side I'd...take lessons w/ local lady for $35 a group lesson, rider her schoolies and compeate them at local un-recognized ht's. there are a few around here and great place to get your feet wet. typically they cost $75 to enter and are only a 1 day thing. So if you take the schoolie and the coach drives you I'd bet you can compeate for under $150. I can't remember the exact cost, but the haul is only 1 hour and she always has a bunch of students going, that keeps your cost down. And school horse have thier own tack, so all you need to buy is hat, boots, shirt, coat and breeches.

So that way I figure you take 1 lesson per week and 1 ht per month and pay around $300 per month.


I have gone that route to get started then bought my own and board which makes it more expensive. Plus I do lessons 2x w/ dressage coach (70 a lesson) and 2x event coach (40 each) And FWIW I also looked in the 5k range for a been there done that older novice level horse and never found it....but with hay prices going up and peopel wanting to sell horses before winter you might have a better chance of finding a horse in this price range....esp if you like small (14.3 to 15.1 hh)

Board $400
Farrier $220
Legend/Adaquan $200
Lessons $220
entiy fees for 1 local unrec ht $75 to $95
Diesel to haul to show and home $75
total: $1100

none of this includes the truck, the trailer, tack, blankets, horse stuff, and trailer stuff.

Local un-rec ht in the Richmond area (baby intro to novice) Calais HT in Powhatan, Campbell Springs Farm in Chesterfield area (right?) (intro nov to training)Deep Run Hunt Pony Club HT in Manikin-Sabot and (intro to Prelim) Greyson Farms in Scottsville-Keene area (south of C-ville).

Badger
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:05 PM
Don't add it up. Just have auto deposit from your paycheck into your retirement account and your savings account and anything similar that MUST be covered first and foremost, and everything that's left over is fair game for horses.

texaseventer
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:15 PM
Don't add it up. Just have auto deposit from your paycheck into your retirement account and your savings account and anything similar that MUST be covered first and foremost, and everything that's left over is fair game for horses.

Retirement account??? Savings account????? :eek::eek::eek::eek: You mean people have those???? I thought you just took out the fixed expenses (including horse stuff) and then whatever was left was fair game for the non essentials like groceries :)

heatherc
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:19 PM
I have found that I set my budget on the high side and then the extra money goes to cover emergency cost such as vet, equipment, clinics. Where I live on the west coast there are not that many quality event trainers so I spend a lot on traveling for lessons, schooling and clinics. The average board and full training runs around $1000.00 a month. But then there are always extras. Playing in the horse world is expensive and there are always hidden fees you don't expect. Do your reasearch and start saving now. The purchase of the horse is the cheep part but don't skimp and get something that has a ton of baggage. Leasing may be the way to go for now. Read your agreement closly so you know what cost you are responsible for and check out insurance. I'm not trying to scare you but you need to know what you may be getting yourself into. Good luck!

Badger
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:30 PM
Retirement account??? Savings account????? :eek::eek::eek::eek: You mean people have those???? I thought you just took out the fixed expenses (including horse stuff) and then whatever was left was fair game for the non essentials like groceries :)

Ha! That's one way to do it. But my way lets me actually sleep at night.

CANTEREOIN
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:30 PM
When I was a teenager, (late 1960's) my dad had just died and my mother was supporting my horse addiction. (1 horse with whom I did Jumpers) One day I got home from school to find Mum at her desk with her head in her hands and piles of papers all over everywhere. She was quite obviously distressed. She looked up at me with a look of horror in her eyes and said, "I have just done something I will NEVER do again." I was shocked. She went on to explain she had just added up all the horse expenses from the last year!

I learned a very important lesson that day. There is no horse budget because just when you think you have it figured out you will get a vet bill that will knock your socks off or your towing vehicle will need some huge repairs or the price of gas will double. Don't budget, just spend thill the money's gone!:eek:

I so agree... When I bought my horse, I saved all my receipts for all my horse expenses, thinking that I would calculate at years end and establish a budget for year two.

Uh, no...

Rule number 1... never, never add up the costs of owning and showing... never.

Rule # 2 - budget monthly for board, shoes and supplements... add 5% for just in case and hope that just in case doesn't happen too frequently.

Rule #3 - pay mortgage, dog walkers monthly

Rule #4 - pay the rest of my expenses as I receive bills (kind of)

Rule #5 - all other income from all sources - dump into horse expenses - lessons, shows etc and hope for the best.

Rule #6 - work real hard and make more money ... work real hard - make more money... work reak hard - make more money.

Terrible system but honest. good luck!

texaseventer
Nov. 20, 2007, 02:34 PM
Can you come over and organize my life, Badger? :) I sleep at night just fine, even when I had Ramen noodles for dinner ;) (Kidding).

Seriously though, my own groceries sometimes do end up taking backseat to horse expenses and dog food. :) My boys (both equine and canine) take such good care of me, I don't mind going without when things get tight. (Fortunately not so much lately!!)

Badger
Nov. 20, 2007, 03:09 PM
Can you come over and organize my life, Badger? :) I sleep at night just fine, even when I had Ramen noodles for dinner ;) (Kidding).

Seriously though, my own groceries sometimes do end up taking backseat to horse expenses and dog food. :) My boys (both equine and canine) take such good care of me, I don't mind going without when things get tight. (Fortunately not so much lately!!)

I literally lived on Raman noodles and popcorn when I was saving up for my first horse as a adult (ah, those blissful days when Dad footed the bill are long gone). I had a special horse/truck/trailer account that I put everything I could into and lived on 6/$1 Raman noodles for a long time. One smart thing I did was save enough to also buy an emergency horse-expenses CD when I bought the horse/truck/trailer, and I left it alone and let it grow and have only touched it for unplanned $$$ horse emergencies. It's paid for surgeries a couple times over the years, but otherwise is left alone.

But I always funded the IRA and 401-K first, then bought the Ramen noodles.

texaseventer
Nov. 20, 2007, 03:13 PM
But I always funded the IRA and 401-K first, then bought the Ramen noodles.

Okay, okay - I do at least have a decent 401K going, and only because it's pre-tax and I don't notice it coming out of my check!!

So I do have SOMETHING to help me digest my kraft dinner a little better. ;) And I do miss those long gone days of mom helping out... lol

The CD is a GREAT idea. I want to save for a trailer, so might just do that! I have an SUV that could pull a smallish trailer, which will do for now!

Thanks Badger, you are inspiring! Savings first, then back to the cheap college food!

heatherc
Nov. 20, 2007, 03:36 PM
I know I sound a little over board about expenses but coming from the hunter jumper world I've experienced first had how expensive this sport can be. The training programs are unreal in costs and then you add your show bills to the monthly costs and you practically have to take out a loan unless you are independantly wealthy or have a sugar daddy. I knew quite a few girls who had boyfriends picked by their earnings so they could afford the fancy show horse. Not only do you have trainer day fees at $50.00 a day, braiding $45.00 a main and $35.00 a tail each day, stabling and class fees, trailering yikes now I remember one reason I left the hunter land. Thinking about it maybe I should take up braiding. They make a bundle.
Horses are just spendy but they keep us sane....most of the time:winkgrin:

LookinSouth
Nov. 20, 2007, 05:53 PM
Ookay, I am NOT EVER going to completely add up my horse expenses, so no help there, but I am going to throw out where my thinking goes whenever I start getting palpitations over how much this sport costs.

1 hour of therapy w/o insurance: $60 and up

1 Coach Purse: $698 http://tinyurl.com/278wrp

Manolos (1 pair, you know you can't wear them more than once every two weeks) $625
http://tinyurl.com/yo8fun

Bar Tab For Night Out (Once a week): I'm going to say $60 - $120

Mani & Pedi: $40 weekly, not in expensive area

Cover Charge for Bars/Clubs: $40/week/weekend

DVD's To Watch In Free Time that NonHorse People Have: $18 each, most people who like to buy movies buy about five or six a month. $108

Playstation 3: $399 (fixed expense, one per year, assuming need to keep up with different brands/technologies)

Each Game for Playstation 3: $60 - 80

Haircut & Color: $120 - $200 per month

Gym Membership: $60/month

Personal Trainer: $400/month

I'm not adding any of this up to be snarky, it's just that for us, our personal trainer, therapist, gym membership, personal entertainment, and free time activities are all packaged up in a cute little package that whinnies when you look at it :D And our hair is usually covered by a baseball cap or helmet. So, I don't feel so much like I'm spending outrageous amounts, especially when I contemplate how much my roommates spend each month on tequila shots and club covers alone. I spend less.


I couldn't agree more. I have no need to buy 150.00 designer jeans, shoes purses, clothes shop every week, tanning etc...as well as go out every weekend like I did priorto having my horse. If you add up the "luxuries" that many non-horsey people spend their money on it is all relative. I loved having nicer clothes and getting my hair done more frequently but NONE of it gave me the joy that my horse has given me!

IQ3day14
Nov. 20, 2007, 06:25 PM
I am still in those stages of slowly taking over the expenses from my parents. But from what I DO know and write checks for:

Per horse per month:

Board: $300 (Feild)

Farrier: $150

Vet: $200

Lessons: $400 (2 per week)

Horse Shows: $500

Ledgen/Adequan: $100

Random: $100

Gas: WAY TOO MUCH

kashmere
Nov. 20, 2007, 08:23 PM
This is going to be bad... ummm

This is in CND $$.

Board: $530 which is awesome considering we have perfect footing, BN-** cross course, 6 sand rings (one of which houses 2 20x60's comfortably), grass stadium ring, huge indoor and wonderful care.



ahh, you must be in the mythical land called "western canada." we easterners sometimes allow ourselves to dream about a world where board like that costs $530.00, but not too often - because it only hurts all the more when we look at our boarding stable. with a 10x10 stall, 1 outdoor ring, 2 pastures and very limited training. and then we sign the $350.00 cheque :lol: to make ourselves feel better we generally pop in for a visit at the $800.00/month facility, look at the crap, dirt paddocks and marshland and think "why god, why?":eek: the brief feeling of contentedness and mild superiority goes away when someone comes out of the barn and says "gee, what a great ride" in january. when it's -40. and then we realize: why? because they have a heated indoor arena.


it's really best not to think about it. :D

Bogie
Nov. 20, 2007, 09:04 PM
In general, you can probably get by on that budget but you might find that the best way to accomplish this would be to half lease a horse that is at an eventing facility. I dipped my toe into the water this way and it really worked out well.


I'm not going to buy a truck or trailer, but hope to lean on the kindness of fellow boarders in exchange for contributing to costs to go to schooling and shows. Is that reasonable?



I think you need to add shipping costs to your equation -- even if you do hitch a ride with someone the cost of gas is pretty high these days and you should be offering them at least half of their gas costs.

As someone with their own trailer, I will haul someone only if they are on the same schedule as I am. Maybe that sounds mean, but I bought a trailer so that I can come and go when it suits me and because my family wants me to come home when I'm done, not hang around and wait for someone else.

When I do haul another horse, I make sure that

1) The horse is insured. If I'm in an accident because someone broadsides my trailer, I don't want to be responsible for someone else's horse.

2) The person who comes with me is responsible for approx. 60% of gas money and needs to clean the trailer out after. The cost of gas is brutal! I was pulling two horses up a long hill last weekend and I swear I could see the gas gauge dropping :eek:. Why more than half? Because I maintain the truck and trailer and spent the $$ up front.

Generally, the folks that I know who don't have trailers ship with their trainers and pay per mile. :D

LookinSouth
Nov. 21, 2007, 10:00 AM
In general, you can probably get by on that budget but you might find that the best way to accomplish this would be to half lease a horse that is at an eventing facility. I dipped my toe into the water this way and it really worked out well.

I]. :D

Absolutely agree. Depending on where you are there may be a wide variety of horses to choose from as well. In Area I there seems to be tons of horses for 1/2 or full lease.

olympicprincess
Nov. 21, 2007, 10:25 AM
This thread is depressing... it's the Holiday season, let's NOT talk about budgeting! :lol:

If I budgeted, I would have found my retired mare another home & would not have bought the CANTER cutie when I graduated college to have a total of 3 horses. :p

Though I don't board them all at the same barns; the eventer gets the nicest facilities ($310), the greenie gets the decent place ($240) and my retired one is at someone's private backyard barn now since she doesn't require any fancy riding facilities ($150). Does this count as budgeting? ;)