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View Full Version : NO!!!! George Washington - dislocated ankle. No hope :(



Iride
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:52 PM
Sometimes I hate this effing sport. Sorry.

excowgirlie
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:53 PM
RIP poor boy.

regret
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:54 PM
R.I.P

harvestmoon
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:54 PM
I just want to curse and cry at the same time. :( I was just thinking, before the race, "What a cool horse..."

excowgirlie
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:56 PM
sad that they pulled the ol boy out of retirement...should have let him be!

Iride
Oct. 27, 2007, 06:57 PM
sad that they pulled the ol boy out of retirement...should have let him be!

Only a select few know how to do that.

summerhorse
Oct. 27, 2007, 07:13 PM
I can see them pulling him out of retirement but he showed last year he couldn't handle dirt and this year he wasn't even able to WIN. WHY was he even here? They said they had nothing to lose. Well George sure did. What a waste.

Iride
Oct. 27, 2007, 07:17 PM
You could see right at the get go this horse wasnt going to make it. Slip sliding all over the place. He won a ton on grass, he couldn't procreate, so they bring him back to run on dirt? Is there no end to peoples' greed? And you can bet it was not Aiden's decision to run him.

Drvmb1ggl3
Oct. 27, 2007, 07:29 PM
You could see right at the get go this horse wasnt going to make it. Slip sliding all over the place. He won a ton on grass, he couldn't procreate, so they bring him back to run on dirt? Is there no end to peoples' greed? And you can bet it was not Aiden's decision to run him.

Get a clue.
It was Aidan's decision to run him.
He was originally scheduled to run in the Champion Stakes in Newmarket last week, but Aidan O'B after talking to Mick Kinane suggested to Messer's Tabor, Magnier and Smith that they take a crack a the Classic.

And give over the damn greed bullshit. People race horses, that's what they do with them. By your dumb logic, John Henry shouldn't have been raced till he was 9. I mean he's already won enough money by the time he was 5. Why did they keeping running him? Was it greed?

Iride
Oct. 27, 2007, 07:32 PM
Apples and oranges.

miss_critic
Oct. 27, 2007, 07:45 PM
To add, 1. they didn't "bring him back to run on dirt". and 2. his classic last year wasn't that bad.

I, like everybody, feel awful about this-but pointing fingers does no good.

Aimee Thanatogenus
Oct. 28, 2007, 04:02 AM
Nope, there is no end to the greed.

Sarie
Oct. 28, 2007, 04:03 AM
I wasn't watching the race when this happened, I just saw it reported online:no: so sad. pictures like this break my heart :( http://sports.yahoo.com/rah/photo?slug=getty-rac-breeders__cup-classic&prov=getty

Mrs. Smith
Oct. 28, 2007, 05:11 AM
Apples and oranges.

I don't see how it's apples and oranges - two horses with fertility issues (assuming you consider gelding a fertility issue) running after they had already been champion.

No one is going to argue that breakdowns are awful - it's a part of the sport than anyone would love to eliminate. But most days we are complaining that all of the top horses are retiring after a 3 year-old campaign and heading to the breeding shed. Personally I find it disappointing that we never get to see how most of them would develop at four. It's hard for casual race fans to get to get involved in events like BC because most of the horses will only run one year and there are few familiar names on the card (except the spring classic winners).

I'm very sad that George Washington was euthanized. I think it's a great loss to the sport. But despite the risk, I wish more horses ran back again after their 3 year-old season. I don't consider it greed. I think it improves the sport.

Condolences to the connections of George Washington and all of his fans.

horsepowerco
Oct. 28, 2007, 10:59 AM
Dont like horse racing and the risked then I'd advise you not even get involved in the sport nor watch from now on. I dont hear this out cry for the heads of the connections of the poor horse at ROLEX this past year. I breed and own racehorses...and was a 3 day event rider for MANY MANY years...these things do happen.

As for as this being about greed...GIVE ME A BREAK. the people who owned Geo Washington are very wealthy...let me say this again...VERY FREEKING WEALTHY! I dont get some of you people...retire a horse at 3 and you all bicker about ending careers too soon....then you bicker about a horses comeback. Guess what cheap claimers breakdown all of the time....I dont hear you bickering about them. Just because they arent on TV doesnt mean they dont happen.

I have seen far more grotesque acts of poor choises for a horses training, and career in the sporthorse world...Hunter forced to pack kids around jump courses, loaded with bute and banemine! Dressage horses who were too sore to finish a lesson on a Thursday compete at Prix St geo on a Sat. If you think this sort of thing doesnt happen an ALL FORMS OF EQUINE SPORT...think again!

Im sorry...surely I have ruffled a few feather in my comments...but I just get sick and tired of people pointing fingers at horse racing...like we are some kind of martyrs. The vet bills for my few racehorses I know for a fact EXCEED those of ALL the showhorses in my barn. Do you think for one minuet any of these SHOWHHORSE owners will spend a dime on x rays and ultrasounds? No! They come to me and ask "is my horse off...should I give bute...should I wrap her in a sweat?" ...and my reply? "Have the horse vetted and know for sure what you are dealing with!" But no the horses is off to a show in a few days...Talk about greedy...to tight with their own money for the vet...but are happy to shell out a few hundred dollars on shipping, trainers fees, show bills, grounds fees, etc...PA-LEEZE!

It is sad when it does happen...just like its sad when a racecar driver is killed, or a football player died from injuries sustained on the field of play...all for our enjoyment.

Geo Washington was a very nice horse...he will be missed and I'm sure today is a sorrowful day in their barns. God Bless...God Speed.

miss_critic
Oct. 28, 2007, 11:35 AM
This is not to take away from GW, but...

It is interesting that there were ~70 some posts about the breeders cup leading into saturday. After the very sad breakdown, there are now over 50 posts for GW. It is sweet, but do any of you watch any racing during non national TV days? I don't see anybody upset about the horse that broke down in the (hypothetical) 5th on a Wednesday somewhere. It is just as sad but it happens. But it is annoying that people react to only a big race on national tv.

A far as "greed" goes, I don't knw the connections so who am I to judge? They have one of the nicest operations in the world. This is horse racing, thats what they do. If the horse was not conditioned properly to race, that is one thing.

I think the point many of us are trying to make is, blaming horse racing or trainers or owners does no good. And coming out of the woodwork on big days being critical is ignorant. It was a VERY VERY sad outcome for GW and that is what I am upset about, just like I would be for that horse in the 5th. And I am very sad for the connections of the horse. Their grief, and for those fans of his in Europe (which far outnumber us here), I am very sorry.

Timex
Oct. 28, 2007, 11:48 AM
and it sucked watching GW's connections stand along the rail and cry as thier horse was put down. apparently, it was open fractures of both sesamoids. what a shame. stop the finger pointing, it's just low class.

rcloisonne
Oct. 28, 2007, 12:27 PM
Dont like horse racing and the risked then I'd advise you not even get involved in the sport nor watch from now on. I dont hear this out cry for the heads of the connections of the poor horse at ROLEX this past year. I breed and own racehorses...and was a 3 day event rider for MANY MANY years...these things do happen.
Actually, there was a huge, world wide uproar over the Amy Tryon fiasco (and the subsequent slap on the wrist she received from the FEI). Eventing is second only to racing in fatal equine injuries. And as they say, two wrongs don't make it right.


I have seen far more grotesque acts of poor choises for a horses training, and career in the sporthorse world...Hunter forced to pack kids around jump courses, loaded with bute and banemine! Dressage horses who were too sore to finish a lesson on a Thursday compete at Prix St geo on a Sat. If you think this sort of thing doesnt happen an ALL FORMS OF EQUINE SPORT...think again!
Of course there is abuse everywhere but it's not common for horses in other athletic pursuits suffer from catastrophic injuries all too often seen in TB racing. And yes, I'm sure the low end claimers have a higher rate of such injuries, which further gives TB racing a bad name.


Im sorry...surely I have ruffled a few feather in my comments...but I just get sick and tired of people pointing fingers at horse racing...like we are some kind of martyrs. The vet bills for my few racehorses I know for a fact EXCEED those of ALL the showhorses in my barn.
No feather ruffled here but did you ever wonder why you have so many vet bills? And martyr is not the word I would chose. ;)


Do you think for one minuet any of these SHOWHHORSE owners will spend a dime on x rays and ultrasounds? No!
That's quite a generalization, isn't it? I've spent PLENTY on my show horses and except for a long retired, chronically foundered mare, none have had a serious lameness problem while being shown. Oh, and I don't dump my horses when they are no longer competitive or past their prime. I've spent as much, if not more, on the old timers to keep them as healthy as possible. They deserve that much.


They come to me and ask "is my horse off...should I give bute...should I wrap her in a sweat?" ...and my reply? "Have the horse vetted and know for sure what you are dealing with!" But no the horses is off to a show in a few days...Talk about greedy...to tight with their own money for the vet...but are happy to shell out a few hundred dollars on shipping, trainers fees, show bills, grounds fees, etc...PA-LEEZE!
I agree with this. I too have been exposed to far too many clueless, cheap-wads in show barns. The type who think nothing of buying the latest over priced custom saddles, breeches and boots yet shop around for the lowest cost farrier in town. Then wonder why their horses are always lame? Can't say things are much better at the low end tracks, though. Can you? Ever see how many horrible feet and cheap shoe jobs there are on the majority of still racing "trainer owned" horses on the Canter USA sites? :no:


It is sad when it does happen...just like its sad when a racecar driver is killed, or a football player died from injuries sustained on the field of play...all for our enjoyment.
Apples to oranges. Human adult athletes choose to compete. Horses have no choice in the matter. BIG difference.

RIP, George Washington. You deserved better.

Timex
Oct. 28, 2007, 12:40 PM
I have seen far more grotesque acts of poor choises for a horses training, and career in the sporthorse world...Hunter forced to pack kids around jump courses, loaded with bute and banemine! Dressage horses who were too sore to finish a lesson on a Thursday compete at Prix St geo on a Sat. If you think this sort of thing doesnt happen an ALL FORMS OF EQUINE SPORT...think again!

Im sorry...surely I have ruffled a few feather in my comments...but I just get sick and tired of people pointing fingers at horse racing...like we are some kind of martyrs. The vet bills for my few racehorses I know for a fact EXCEED those of ALL the showhorses in my barn. Do you think for one minuet any of these SHOWHHORSE owners will spend a dime on x rays and ultrasounds? No!

As the owner of more than a few show horses, i consider that extremely insulting. You want to question the care given to ALL show horses just because you have had bad experiences with some owners? turn it around. think of the bad experiences most show horse owners have had with race horse people. can you judge ALL by the behavior of SOME? hardly. my show horses and my race horses get the same care, regardless.

Ellenaki
Oct. 28, 2007, 12:57 PM
Horse racing sadly is - quite simply and precisely put - the legal abuse of equines.
My grandfather raised TBs for the track, on his farm in NE.
It amazed me how few of any of his or his friends' (well bred, well raised) horses ever made it to the track, let alone to their first race - and then how many of them broke down.
To what end?
As Pythagoras, a brilliant Greek mind, once said -
“As long as man continues to be the ruthless destroyer of lower livings beings, he will never know health or peace. For as long as men massacre animals, they will kill each other. Indeed, he who sows the seed of murder and pain cannot reap joy and love.”

Racing - in the end, beyond the glitz and glamor and money that really only surrounds a very, very small percentage of racing in total - is a 'ruthless destroyer'.
It is time for us Humans to get the big picture.

Rubs Not Pats
Oct. 28, 2007, 01:33 PM
The vet bills for my few racehorses I know for a fact EXCEED those of ALL the showhorses in my barn. Do you think for one minuet any of these SHOWHHORSE owners will spend a dime on x rays and ultrasounds? No! They come to me and ask "is my horse off...should I give bute...should I wrap her in a sweat?" .

My husband used to be a track veterinarian at Belmont/Aquaduct and got out of it due to care issues and unwillingness of owners to work up their horses. The grass always sounds greener.

I for one, find your comments offensive. I have flown out Barrie Grant to Bagby Basket yearlings, only to donate them, fixed OCD horses, our gelding who was leading the nation two years ago in HB broke his leg and ruptured all his collaterals, is he dead? My mare is on month 7 of a year of walk trot and shockwave, stem cell and agressive therapy for a medial collateral. Not everyone who owns show horses are cheap and ignorant. I seem to be with George on this one that there is a true lack horsemanship in those that are being brtought through the system BUT that is the fault of the trainers. They need to better educate the owners. I think there will always be a bottom rung in any dicipline.

Racing is not evil and things happen. It is horrific when it does. I watched Wanda gallop down to the finish line at Belmont that year. I was 17 and wanted nothing more than to be involved in the TB's. I cried when Barbaro died. His injury was at roughly the same time as Bob's. When irresponsibility leads to these injuries, it is reprehensible but sometimes they are luck of the draw. Either way, please don't catagorise all showhorse people with the same brush. That is the same ignorant behavior that people do when one horse breaks down on national TV and the next thing we hear is racing is bad.

Godspeed GW.

On the Farm
Oct. 28, 2007, 01:33 PM
Actually, there was a huge, world wide uproar over the Amy Tryon fiasco (and the subsequent slap on the wrist she received from the FEI). Eventing is second only to racing in fatal equine injuries. And as they say, two wrongs don't make it right.


Of course there is abuse everywhere but it's not common for horses in other athletic pursuits suffer from catastrophic injuries all too often seen in TB racing. And yes, I'm sure the low end claimers have a higher rate of such injuries, which further gives TB racing a bad name.


No feather ruffled here but did you ever wonder why you have so many vet bills? And martyr is not the word I would chose. ;)


That's quite a generalization, isn't it? I've spent PLENTY on my show horses and except for a long retired, chronically foundered mare, none have had a serious lameness problem while being shown. Oh, and I don't dump my horses when they are no longer competitive or past their prime. I've spent as much, if not more, on the old timers to keep them as healthy as possible. They deserve that much.


I agree with this. I too have been exposed to far too many clueless, cheap-wads in show barns. The type who think nothing of buying the latest over priced custom saddles, breeches and boots yet shop around for the lowest cost farrier in town. Then wonder why their horses are always lame? Can't say things are much better at the low end tracks, though. Can you? Ever see how many horrible feet and cheap shoe jobs there are on the majority of still racing "trainer owned" horses on the Canter USA sites? :no:


Apples to oranges. Human adult athletes choose to compete. Horses have no choice in the matter. BIG difference.

RIP, George Washington. You deserved better.

I'm not sure if your comments are borne of ignorance or sheer stupidity, but they're definitely borne of arrogance.

TheCoppertop
Oct. 28, 2007, 02:47 PM
I watched this race like I watch every race, with one eye closed, one squinting.. fearful of a breakdown. I keep watching though because I love TBs so much.

Poor George Washington.. and Pine Island, and Barbaro.

Bad bones are even more genetic than speed. Never heard of a Clydesdales ankle shattering just from using it.

We need bigger-boned (though not Clyde sized lol), hardier TBs.. which would increase race times, but it'll never happen.

I'm so thankful my TB sucked at racing before she was injured.

Drvmb1ggl3
Oct. 28, 2007, 02:56 PM
Bad bones are even more genetic than speed. Never heard of a Clydesdales ankle shattering just from using it.


Never heard of a Cyldsedale going fast enough to break a sweat, so yeah you're right, it's unlikely they'd shatter semasoids.

So, pray tell, where did George Washington inherit his bad bones from?

horsepowerco
Oct. 28, 2007, 03:31 PM
NO I have vet bills cause I care to monitor my horses health and well being...its a comon practice, Preventiive medicine...take it how ever you want I have big shoulders! I too own show horses, I also teach Dressage...I never tell a rider to administer drugs of anytype...ASK YOU VET! However I hate to hear people bad mouthing horse racing like this when there are issues everywhere...if I offended you...oh well Sorry.

On the Farm
Oct. 28, 2007, 03:51 PM
My husband used to be a track veterinarian at Belmont/Aquaduct and got out of it due to care issues and unwillingness of owners to work up their horses. The grass always sounds greener.


Care to share his name? Maybe I knew him or know someone else who knew him.

Big_Tag
Oct. 28, 2007, 06:48 PM
Bad bones are even more genetic than speed. Never heard of a Clydesdales ankle shattering just from using it.

We need bigger-boned (though not Clyde sized lol), hardier TBs.. which would increase race times, but it'll never happen.


I don't know a whole lot about TB racing..but if I am not mistaken, haven't the TBs kind of reached a plateau in terms of speed? If so, I don't know how recently that occurred, but are breakdowns increasing w/o an increase of speed?

You're not going to hear the "racing is cruel" rigmarole from me. Like any other sport, or anything at all, there are the people who do right by the horse and people who don't. AND, there are things that *just happen* with not real reason behind it.

I don't know anything about George Washington, or his connections, or his pre-race soundness, so I cannot comment on this particular situation, but there is no use in pointing fingers and pontificating about how cruel racing is. How many people here know a horse that has been catastrophically injured in a pasture accident? Does that make it cruel to turn a horse out? Yes, I know the old "they are FORCED to do it, it's different!" And that may be the case, they may not consciously say "I'd LOVE to go out and race" but you are a fool if you believe there is not a love of racing within many horses.

Look, I am not saying this occurrence isn't a tragic thing, it's just not what I would call "cruelty to animals."

Cornerpost
Oct. 29, 2007, 11:23 PM
Look, I am not saying this occurrence isn't a tragic thing, it's just not what I would call "cruelty to animals."

I agree. In every group of people you will find the best of people and the worst, and a lot in the middle. You will find examples of the most kind wonderful, ethical people and the most horrid, unethical. Generalizations are usless and unnessasarily hurtfull. I doubt GW's people would have ran him if they thought they were risking too much, but hindsight is 20/20.

LE
Oct. 30, 2007, 08:25 AM
I have tried to ask this question, but been attacked for it, so maybe the people here will answer my question:
Why was the horse (George Washington) retired in the first place? Is it just a common track practice to retire them after they win a certain amount, then breed? I mean, that would make sense. Then, I read that GW DID breed, but not enough? That confused me. I don't know what subfertile means, and apparently no one was willing to answer my questions.

It's a real shame about this accident. I guess we'll never know the answers to the 'whys'. Why was he brought out of retirement, why was he run in footing they knew he wasn't great in etc.

Like the poster above me said, hindsight is 20/20. Godspeed GW.

europa
Oct. 30, 2007, 09:01 AM
They are simply too young to sustain the workloads at 2 that they are doing.....go on Canter and look at all the broken youngsters....heartbreaking really. And it is OH SO FUNNY to call it track jewelry.

Why can't they give them an extra year to develop? As a WB breeder I wait till 4 to even begin to do anything with mine. The youth and the trainers with little knowledge of conditioning and horse care are really taking a toll on alot of them. The big $$$ trainers have working knowledge but the run of the mill guys are questionable at best!

It is a sad statement on the racing industry. Just look at how strong Curlin is and I believe if memory serves me he was unraced as a 2 year old. The older I get the more I empathize with the horses.....I want to shoot the TN Walking people that basically torture there horse on stilts and throw hot sauce on there legs. I feel the same contempt for the people who are in the business of contributing to the casualties of the racetrack. What becomes of these horses?

I feel better....of course this is not a blanket statement of all trainers but it certainly is happening to FAR to many horses to just be a fluke.

Drvmb1ggl3
Oct. 30, 2007, 10:38 AM
I have tried to ask this question, but been attacked for it, so maybe the people here will answer my question:
Why was the horse (George Washington) retired in the first place? Is it just a common track practice to retire them after they win a certain amount, then breed? I mean, that would make sense. Then, I read that GW DID breed, but not enough? That confused me. I don't know what subfertile means, and apparently no one was willing to answer my questions.

It's a real shame about this accident. I guess we'll never know the answers to the 'whys'. Why was he brought out of retirement, why was he run in footing they knew he wasn't great in etc.

Like the poster above me said, hindsight is 20/20. Godspeed GW.

It is common practice to retire CHAMPION 3yos, and has been the practice since the introduction of Classic races 240 odd years ago, i.e the inception of the TB as a breed. That's what the TB is all about, race, retire the best and breed to the best.

GW went to stud, but it turned out he was sub-fertile, that means the motility of his sperm was low, i.e the chances of getting a mare in foal were very low. So the people that had booked mares to him didn't want to breed to him anymore.
So he was removed from stud duties and put back into training, because afterall he was racehorse, and racing is what he did best.

And why do people keep saying "footing he wasn't great in"? Sweet mother of divine jesus, where are you getting that from?

caffeinated
Oct. 30, 2007, 11:24 AM
They are simply too young to sustain the workloads at 2 that they are doing.....go on Canter and look at all the broken youngsters....heartbreaking really. And it is OH SO FUNNY to call it track jewelry.


All the "broken" youngsters? Quite a lot of them are perfectly sound.

Buffyblue
Oct. 30, 2007, 11:31 AM
Either way, please don't catagorise all showhorse people with the same brush. That is the same ignorant behavior that people do when one horse breaks down on national TV and the next thing we hear is racing is bad.

Godspeed GW.

I agree with you, and it's very frustrating to see this kind of thoughtless categorization running rampant. Just as an aside - if you ever had a big chestnut TB mare at Bergen Beach - I think I might know you! Cheers.

europa
Oct. 30, 2007, 11:58 AM
PLZ.....then why is it called Track Jewelry? I don't see alot of Hunter Jewelry.

I am not trying to start an argument but lets get honest here. That is a terrific pounding DAY AFTER DAY.

Please explain then an OLD ANKLE on a young horse......why is that? Well hello because they have been pounded relentlessly.

LE
Oct. 30, 2007, 01:11 PM
It was reported that the footing GW was running on was not footing he was comfortable on. He'd apprently raced last year at the Breeders Cup and did not finish well. Reports had said he wasn't running his best on turf, which was his comfort zone(According to an article I read). I know some horses from the track(which are now hunters) either love all types of footing, or prefer one type. Most often than not, they are pretty good in all types(grass, sand, mud etc) Of course, hunter courses are not ridden at the speeds race horses are going.

So, GW wasn't able to impregnant the mares so they returned him to racing--do race horse owners not choose a different life for their horses after racing? Meaning, could he not have gone to be a jumper or hunter? Since he was so young, they could have done anything with him---I do understand now that of course, he was bred to race, so by all means, return him to racing--but reports said he wasn't the same horse when he returned.

Anyhow, thank you for answering my questions. I have no beef with the track actually. Sure, there are bad apples, but you'll find them in any equestrian discipline. Don't let bad apples spoil the orchard. There are many awesome, knowledgeable and very KIND horse people at the track and I've been very happy to call them good friends.

From a book I have, it does state the brief/intermitten, short bursts of gallop work on a 2 year old TB is known to strengthen bones. I guess the wonder now is what is deemd 'brief'?

On the Farm
Oct. 30, 2007, 01:41 PM
They are simply too young to sustain the workloads at 2 that they are doing.....go on Canter and look at all the broken youngsters....heartbreaking really. And it is OH SO FUNNY to call it track jewelry.

Why can't they give them an extra year to develop? As a WB breeder I wait till 4 to even begin to do anything with mine. The youth and the trainers with little knowledge of conditioning and horse care are really taking a toll on alot of them. The big $$$ trainers have working knowledge but the run of the mill guys are questionable at best!

It is a sad statement on the racing industry. Just look at how strong Curlin is and I believe if memory serves me he was unraced as a 2 year old. The older I get the more I empathize with the horses.....I want to shoot the TN Walking people that basically torture there horse on stilts and throw hot sauce on there legs. I feel the same contempt for the people who are in the business of contributing to the casualties of the racetrack. What becomes of these horses?

I feel better....of course this is not a blanket statement of all trainers but it certainly is happening to FAR to many horses to just be a fluke.

Just to let you know pal, I've seen alot of warmbloods who have been crippled by jumping. Secondly, we get alot of people from the show world who are entering the racing industry for the first time. Without exception, the first thing they find out is that they have to improve their horsemanship and riding skills immensely, along with their general horse knowledge.

Be sure to keep an umbrella handy, you might drown in a sudden rain squall.

Barnfairy
Oct. 30, 2007, 02:05 PM
PLZ.....then why is it called Track Jewelry? I don't see alot of Hunter Jewelry.
I've seen plenty of hunter's bumps, though. SI injuries can be devastating.

And while I don't think there's a catchy name for it, I've known an awful lot of dressage horses with hock pain & spavins.

I've seen plenty of horses who haven't been started until 3 or 4 still get hurt at work, sometimes catastrophically so.

There is good and bad in everything.

I've been hesitant to post this recent experience...but I think ultimately it is relevant along the vein of "sometimes horrific things just happen for reasons we may never understand."

Two weekends ago, my husband and I took our dogs to the beach for a romp. Several horses were being ridden there that day as well. Beautiful day, the weather was just perfect.

When we were getting ready to go home, as I was putting the dogs in the car for no real reason I just happened to turn my head in the direction of where the horse trailers were parked. At that exact moment, I saw a horse rear up, flip over backwards, hit his head on the parking lot, roll over and lift his head & neck as if he were going to get up, but then go flat out.

Because my vantage point was behind the horse, I saw exactly the angle of his neck and how his head hit as he went down, and I knew it wasn't good. I ran over to help. The owners were stunned motionless. I assessed the situation: the horse was alive but unconscious, blood pouring mainly out of one nostril indicative of skull fracture, eyes open but not blinking, pupils unresponsive, respiration rapid and labored, and already showing signs of shock. I strongly suspect he had internal hemorrhaging and quite possibly cervical spinal fracture. Because the owners were so upset, I stayed by this horse's side until the vet arrived. The horse was ultimately euthanized.

I've seen some pretty horrible things in my life, but this had to be one of the worst. Unlike at the track, it took 45 minutes for a vet to get on the scene. I thank God that at least the horse was unconscious.

If you've never had trouble loading a horse, you haven't been around long enough. But should we never trailer our horses anywhere? Of course not. That horse's owners would do anything to have him be stubborn again. Sometimes assigning blame is not only pointless but completely inappropriate.

europa
Oct. 30, 2007, 02:31 PM
LE you sound like a sensible sort! Don't let that bother you.

I have to clear up my posts.......and I am not your PAL BUDDY (On the Farm)....I have been to alot of race tracks and there are some really crappy conditions and trainers there...I don't know who you are kidding. I pride myself on my horse care and judge of soundness issues. NONE of my horses have suffered from bone injuries and I can tell you that having ridden Hunters and then Jumpers in Europe that you DO NOT see the injuries that racing produces. It is very strenuous and the nature of racing DOES mean that there will be alot of injuries. Even the best of trainers have to deal with them. It just hurts my heart to see it happening to these glorious creatures. I am not saying do away with racing but I think some of the running through the youngsters needs to stop. Perhaps certifications for the trainers.....I don't know help me here. I am not a card carrying PETA member but there has to be a better way. I love watching racing but with Barbaro and my personal fav Ruffian I guess some of the wind has gone out of my sail. I loved Charismatic also and that was devastating to me.

europa
Oct. 30, 2007, 02:49 PM
And you know On The Farm us HJ people don't have any real horse knowledge anyway.....just a prime example is Michael Matz right?

I would like a reasonable answer why they can't wait a year for the horses to be 3 for the classics..........something other then that is the way it always has been.

OldSaddleBag
Oct. 30, 2007, 03:08 PM
How heart-wrenching it must be for the Jacksons who bred GW. He won the 2,000 Guineas on the day Barbaro won the Kentucky Derby. They, too, are in my thoughts.

CYF
Oct. 30, 2007, 03:59 PM
So much for horse people pulling together and toasting a fine horse with an untimely passing. Is this COTH or TMP?

RIP George Washington.

Drvmb1ggl3
Oct. 30, 2007, 04:10 PM
It was reported that the footing GW was running on was not footing he was comfortable on. He'd apprently raced last year at the Breeders Cup and did not finish well. Reports had said he wasn't running his best on turf, which was his comfort zone(According to an article I read).


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

GET A CLUE.

Ok, that out of my system, lets try this again... typing slowing so you can keep up.

George Washington was 6th in the BC last year, ahead of such horses as Lawyer Ron and Lava Man, commonly considered to be badasses on the dirt. He also had a legitimate excuse that he was bumped at the head of the stretch without which he may have finished closer.
If that is your idea of not doing well on dirt, then 95% of the dirt horses in America need to be taken of the track right away.
DID YOU EVEN BOTHER TO WATCH THE RACE? How could you have an opinion if you didn't watch the race?

As to his form this year, which race did he not do well in?
The Queen Anne Stakes at Ascot? which he almost won, racing against the top Milers in the world, and his first race back after a season spent covering mares?
The Eclipse at Sandown? Where he almost beat the premier middle distance 3yo in the world?
The Prix du Moulin? Where he finished strong behind the top ranked miler in the world, without being asked to dig deep (the race was being used a prep for the QEII, which he ended up not running in).

Can you please give me an analysis of each of those races and tell us what exactly about those performances was horrible, or better still an indicator that he shouldn't have raced in the classic?
DID YOU EVEN BOTHER TO WATCH THE RACES? How could you have an opinion if you didn't watch the races.

Do us all a favour and go away and get a clue first, then come back and have an intelligent conversation.

ravenclaw
Oct. 30, 2007, 04:17 PM
lets try this again... typing slow so you can keep up.
:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Erin
Oct. 30, 2007, 04:27 PM
Everyone who decided to use this thread for their own little snarkfest just got banned for a week. And the alters went bye-bye permanently.

I assume the rest of you are capable of discussing things like adults? If so, carry on.

On the Farm
Oct. 30, 2007, 05:40 PM
And you know On The Farm us HJ people don't have any real horse knowledge anyway.....just a prime example is Michael Matz right?

I would like a reasonable answer why they can't wait a year for the horses to be 3 for the classics..........something other then that is the way it always has been.

First, Michael Matz was hardly an overnight success in the racing world. He'd been in racing quite awhile before getting the big horse. No doubt he's a good horseman, but he had to earn his chops.

A reasonable answer? First, the Triple Crown is for three year-olds. Secondly, scientific study has shown that waiting a year or two for a horse to "develop" is actually more harmful. Research has been done in North America, Australia, and Great Britain, with the results being the same--racing horses need early stress to build the necessary bone density to stand up to the rigors of the sport.

That being said, I'm still no fan of the 2yo in training sales.

Last Shot
Oct. 31, 2007, 12:00 AM
I do believe this was just a sad accident that happened in a big race.

The rest seems to be personal inuendos that are lost on the majority of people.

Farewell to a great racer George Washington.

gubbyz
Oct. 31, 2007, 01:29 AM
I gotta agree with CYF. This post was to remember a great horse, not start a feud. Shame on you guys. Every sport has its share of tragedy, be it animal or human. Poor kid who had a heart attack shooting baskets. Or the kid parylized from a bad hit playing football. It comes with the territory. So you can say we make them run, but we also make them jump, spin, piaffe, etc... as long as riding is a sport, tragedy will follow sometimes, as will victory.