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53
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:04 AM
If you had a horse for sale, and Aiken was within a reasonable distance to you, would you consider it?

What price range of horse would you take to a sale like that?

Would you only take a fancy prospect or upper level horse, or would a nice novice/training packer be realistic to take?

Its an interesting and appealing idea, but as a seller, a $225 'entry' fee plus the requirement to provide a full set of films is a little daunting. I know that is standard for a sale, but I've never been to one and wonder about the benefit of making that much of an 'investment' in my advertising by attending a sale.

Experiences? Thoughts?


http://www.aikeneventhorsesale.com/index.html

Twinkletozzz
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:16 AM
Yes, I'd go and I'd take whatever really good youngster or baby I had. The fees might be a little high for you, but the exposure of your horse is also quite high. I have known of a couple horses sold later because a trainer with client had earlier seen them at one Aiken opportunity or another, but because of the fees, I'd take only my best.

Debbie
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:32 AM
I'm a little put off by the $125 fee for buyers plus signing a certificate of funds available to buy. What if you're a legitimate tire kicker who just wants a look see? Those people have feelings, too! :D

Seriously, it will be interesting to see if it takes off and what that says about the evolution of eventing/eventers.

eventamy
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:46 AM
THat looks like it would be very convenient and a lot of fun! I forwarded the link to my trainer to see if she has any clients who are interested.

OneDaySoon
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:51 AM
Definately interested in attending. Fantastic idea. I'd like to see a range of horses and prices - something for everyone. I don't mind the $125 fee for viewing or $225 for selling. However I'd like to go to this inaugural event to watch in 2008...so don't like that we have to produce a Certificate of Available Funds.

LongLeaf
Oct. 23, 2007, 10:02 AM
I'm considering taking my coming 3 year old pinto warmblood, but am a little daunted by the $225 and full set of rads. But considering it won't cost much more than a weekend show plus it'll get her some good exposure I may do it if she's not sold by then. It sounds like it might be a bit of a "swank" affair, almost invitation only - if you can prove that you can purchase a horse, you can come. :rolleyes: I will, by far, be the least swank person there! I'd also like to know how to put a "No Haggle" price on your horse. Isn't that part of buying and selling - the haggling?

Oops, I'm trying to turn the cocktail party into a gypsy haggling campfire! See, I told you I wasn't Swank!

53
Oct. 23, 2007, 11:54 AM
Longleaf - that's the same thing I've been thinking...the cost of taking my sale horse is the same as an event, give or take, depending on how many xrays they want. But I worry about being 'outclassed' with a novice/training packer in a sea of uber-nice horses as twinkletozz alludes to.

bornfreenowexpensive
Oct. 23, 2007, 12:10 PM
Yeah...I will have to think on it. I have a 5 year old gelding that I'm selling. I like that it is not an auction. But not sure if it will be worth it for him. I would worry about who buys him. I'm only selling him because I have too many horses and who buys him and the home he goes to is as important to me (if not more) then his sale price. So the more I'm thinking about...the more I think I would not do it. I want to be able to say nope....don't think you are the right match for him. He is a character and I want him to go to someone who will have fun with him and call me if things are not going well.

I will need to look in to it some and check out the details.....like can I say no to a buyer. But it is an interesting concept....and one as a BUYER, I love.

Eventingjunkie
Oct. 23, 2007, 12:14 PM
I may plunk the money down and go, just for the education of it all. ..You never know when you will be buying or selling. I will be interested to see the pricing of individual horses and if buyer's are willing to pay these prices. It seems like a great idea.

Hilary
Oct. 23, 2007, 01:37 PM
It would be a lot of fun to go to - easy for me to say several hundred miles away and not in the market for a horse, but if it was local it would be a fun thing to just go see. And if I did have a horse for sale or wanted to buy it would be a really cool idea.

grzywinskia
Oct. 23, 2007, 01:52 PM
Here's a question for ya'll. How far would you travel to a sale such as this if you didn't have to pay a buyers fee? IE would you fly to the opposite coast for a sale like this if you could preview the horses online and didn't have to pay?

53
Oct. 23, 2007, 02:50 PM
I'll see how things go with the market, if I haven't sold this horse as things get closer, I'll consider it, I think the number of films required will be the deal breaker, those can really add up if they require multiple views, but then again, if I haven't sold him by then, the attraction of having access to so many (hopefully, not sure of the numbers they are expecting) potential buyers.

I appreciate the responses. I just didn't want to be showing up with a horse who was not appropriate for the market.

bornfreenowexpensive
Oct. 23, 2007, 03:03 PM
I was also wondering what the price range on the horses will be....and what type they are.

Anyone know how the commissions are working with this sale? I would think as a seller, I would include the commission I would pay my trainer as part of the sale price and the buyer would have to pay commissions to its own representative. Or do you think the haggling will still take place but instead it will be on who pays what commisions?

Glory Bound
Oct. 23, 2007, 03:08 PM
I can't wait until February! I would LOVE to go!

Fence2Fence
Oct. 23, 2007, 03:15 PM
For buyers, the fee of $125 includes lunch and a cocktail party and you can have a guest.

I've paid more on tickets for benefits with no horses in sight.

I think it's a really neat idea.

GotSpots
Oct. 23, 2007, 04:38 PM
Don't forget that as a buyer, you have films available to you - thus cutting the cost of the prepurchase substantially. That's a huge incentive to me, though it does to my mind disincentivize sellers because it shifts costs (I assume they'd ramp up the sale price accordingly).

I'd prefer to have some sense ahead of time of what would be offered for sale: if I'm in the market for, say, a young riders horse, I'd be irritated if I paid my $125 and all there was for sale was fancy five year olds.

ThirdCharm
Oct. 23, 2007, 04:47 PM
Sounds like fun, I have a pretty fancy rising 4 yo who might be a candidate. I guess like others I would like to get an idea of what kind of horses there will be, and of course how many radiographs! That could get pricey. But this is going to be a pricey 4 yo too, and the exposure would be good.

Jennifer

QHEventr
Oct. 23, 2007, 05:05 PM
I have a coming 3 yr old filly who is homebred and getting nicer by the day. She has been backed, but probably wont be doing much as far as jumping, OR flat work by Feb. Any thoughts?

Alos have a couple coming yearlings...would LOVE LOVE LOVE to get them sold to sport horse homes early in hopes that they are developed into world class eventers. Are they only consigning horses of riding age? Or is there going to be interest in the "Future event horses" as well?

Johanna

basil's mom
Oct. 23, 2007, 05:35 PM
I am planning on taking my now 3 will be 4yo to the sale. I believe they are willing to allow any age horse in as long as you are willing to put up the entry fee. There should be all price ranges available. My guy will be very reasonably priced. I believe there will be a jog so they should be handled enough to jog in hand and maybe lunge so folks can see them move. I will contact Craig and see if there is an age limit or not.

HotIITrot
Oct. 23, 2007, 05:39 PM
I'd prefer to have some sense ahead of time of what would be offered for sale: if I'm in the market for, say, a young riders horse, I'd be irritated if I paid my $125 and all there was for sale was fancy five year olds.

Me too! Like grzywinskia was saying, it would be nice to view the horses on-line before hand with prices so a buyer has an idea of what they are in for. It does sound like a really neat concept though. I'm glad they're doing it & I hope it goes well and sticks around.

To OP (or anyone else who can answer):

I never even heard of this; how did you know it was going on?

Horseless1
Oct. 23, 2007, 08:41 PM
The sale sounds like a fantastic deal for someone selling their own horse who doesn't want to pay a fee to an agent. They get exposure to many buyers for a pretty minimal cost.

As a buyer, I would consider going to this if I could see the horses and prices online before going. But I doubt the organizers will do this as they don't want to miss getting their cut. From their site: "A transaction fee will be charged to the buyer of each horse sold. Buyers and Sellers will be contractually bound to pay this fee to the Aiken Event Horse Sale even if the exchange is made after the completion of the Aiken Event Horse Sale."

I assume the fee that I, as a buyer, must pay will be 10% considering this other rule on their site: "A buyer's indication to pre-purchase a horse will be considered a sale pending an onsite satisfactory veterinary exam. Buyers who indicate a sale or execute a pre-purchase that is satisfactory but do not buy same horse will be charged a fee of 10% of the purchase price."

Two things bother me:
1. If I bring a trainer with me, I'll be shelling out 10% to the trainer as well as 10% to the organizers of this thing! Perhaps the organizers should split their "transaction fee" between the seller and the buyer...

2. I could also be stuck paying 10% to the organizers for NOT buying a horse if I don't like the vetting. Not everyone has the same idea of "satisfactory". If you don't agree with the provided vet's opinion, who will decide what a "satisfactory" veterinary exam is? According to the site, "Disputes arising out of the sale will be arbitrated by the Aiken Event Horse Sale Executive Committee, whose decision will be binding on all parties." Eeek!

53
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:11 PM
HotIItrot - I saw it on the area 2 website and started investigating. I am really leaning toward taking my guy there if he doesn't sell by the end of January. I really appreciate everyone's thoughts on this, it really helps to hear what other people are thinking.

cteventing
Oct. 23, 2007, 09:16 PM
Hi All,

Thanks for your interest, enthusiasm, concerns, questions and input!

I am trying to respond to your specific concerns via private message. We are also compiling a list of FAQs based on this discussion. Hope to have this posted on our site in the next few days, so keep an eye out for that.

I encourage everyone to join our email list. I also suggest that you continue to ask questions. As we have said, this has not been done before and though we may not get everything right, we are doing our best. Having your suggestions truly helps!

To clarify, transaction fees of 3.5% of the no-haggle price will be paid to the Aiken Event Horse Sale by the seller.

Please continue to check out our website as we continue to fine tune the deatils. The website can be found at www.aikeneventhorsesale.com.

Thanks,
Craig

emf
Oct. 24, 2007, 10:46 AM
I wonder how sellers will show everything they want to, and buyers see all they want to, of a particular horse without the atmosphere becoming chaotic and not conducive to horses showing their best performance.

Horseless1
Oct. 24, 2007, 11:13 AM
To clarify, transaction fees of 3.5% of the no-haggle price will be paid to the Aiken Event Horse Sale by the seller.

Whew! I like that change. :)

A couple of other questions: Will buyers be able to get more recents rads done on site if they wish? (12 months might be a bit old if the horse has been competing heavily all year.)

The site also says, "Buyers will be required to sign a waiver confirming that they have a specific amount to spend." Is this something at the buyer's word or will buyers have to show bank statements, etc. as proof?

Hope this isn't hijacking! Thanks.

grzywinskia
Oct. 24, 2007, 11:17 AM
emf- I think it would be great to see a chaotic environment there... would be like a Beginner Novice XC warm-up LOL. You could see what you might be dealing with in the future.

:)

Horseless1
Oct. 24, 2007, 11:46 AM
emf- I think it would be great to see a chaotic environment there... would be like a Beginner Novice XC warm-up LOL. You could see what you might be dealing with in the future.

:)

That's a good point! Maybe they should set up the sale like a mini event so you could see the horse warm up, do a dressage test for its level then do a stadium course and a modified xc course. That way it could be organized by level and you could compare horses more easily. I worry it might be confusing to see a bunch of different level horses together...

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Oct. 24, 2007, 11:52 AM
Where in Aiken will it be held?

ThirdCharm
Oct. 24, 2007, 11:53 AM
Ummm, yeah. Maybe sellers could set up a little VCR by their stall to show how poopsikins can actually trot instead of doing airs above the ground when alone in an arena at home, but that would be of relatively little interest to me as a potential buyer..... I can go to the track to see talented athletes standing on their hind legs with grooms dangling and spend a lot less $$$..... :-)

Jennifer

53
Oct. 24, 2007, 01:50 PM
jeannette - hit the link I put in the first post, it gives directions to the location

Beam Me Up
Oct. 24, 2007, 02:23 PM
I like the idea of an event sale, with numerous eventers in the same place and a sale geared toward showing event skills/potential.

Obviously after the first one, a lot of our questions will be answered, but the site itself leaves some open questions . . .

"Satisfactory vetting"--normally that means satisfactory to the buyer, but apparently not in this case? (as they will lose 10% if they find it unsatisfactory and some other party finds it satisfactory). We know that vets don't pass/fail in this day and age, so who is making this call? As a buyer this would make me uncomfortable, that I didn't have total say in the vet check, esp. if I were spending a lot of money (or losing 10% of a lot of money).

If both parties agree that the vetting was unsatisfactory, can the "no-haggle" price be negotiated at that point?

The budget waiver--how/why is proof required of buyers (assuming they are only paying with secure methods)? What if they go with one price range (and probably horse description) in mind, then find something more experienced and pricey?

Is the purpose to keep buyers with less money off the expensive horses? (An admirable goal--seriously--just hard to enforce).

I would probably wait until the second year for the reports, if I weren't right in Aiken. But I am interested in the reports!

53
Oct. 24, 2007, 02:38 PM
beammeup - that does bring up a good point about payment....I'm sure Craig will answer it when he gets a chance...but, I wonder how payments are to be arranged? The sale is during the week so banks will be open, so I would assume wire transfers could be arranged on the second day.

retreadeventer
Oct. 25, 2007, 03:42 PM
My feeling is the sale is only as good as the folks putting it on. It's not an auction, that much is pretty clear -- at least they are trying to make it out like it's high class. With sales you have two ways to go. Exposure to a LOT of people, or exposure to a small amount of people who are supposedly well heeled enough to make the decision. I have a feeling that you could keep your horse at home and do the usual selling procedure and do the same as spending the time, money, effort to send a horse down to this and get same result. JMO.

cteventing
Oct. 25, 2007, 11:08 PM
Again, thanks to everyone for your interest!

I agree with retreadeventer completely. The sale is only as good as we make it. That is why we have enlisted the help of a great and dedicated committee. Lara Anderson, Stephie Baer, Mara Dean, Helen Delacroce, Phillip Dutton, Zeb Fry, Holly Hepp, Nadeem Noon and Sharon White have been instrumental in developing the Aiken Event Horse Sale.

Craig has experience developing and organizing horse trials (i.e., Surefire Horse Trials 2004 and 2005 and the Maryland Horse Trials on 2006). He also has a great deal of experience buying and selling horses, which has certainly helped us in the planning stages of the sale.

We are glad to see a lot of enthusiasm on this board. We sincerely hope that you all will keep you questions/concerns and suggestions coming. Hope to see you in February!

Thanks,
Sarah

www.aikeneventhorsesale.com
www.craigthompsoneventing.com

Carol Ames
Oct. 25, 2007, 11:33 PM
Is tere a catalogue online?

cteventing
Oct. 27, 2007, 09:08 AM
Carol,

There will be a sale catalogue closer to the actual event.

Thanks,
Craig

DancingPretense
Oct. 27, 2007, 04:24 PM
I would still like to know how we must prive we have the money available to attend as a buyer?

I also think it would be an excellent idea to have photos, stats and price range on most of the horses that will be there ahead of time. That way we know if it is the right place for us to attend.

Platinum Equestrian
Oct. 28, 2007, 09:20 PM
I think it sounds like a great idea... nice website and it seems there is planning involved and there will be national advertising. It seems like these things usually just "pop up" right before the event date, so nice to have four months to plan.

Additionally, as a seller, I LOVE the fact shoppers have to be pre-qualified. What a beautiful thing.

Wondering for those of you who are eventers/may know more about this event... I would consider taking an irish horse we have for sale if not sold by this time. Since I'm now riding the jumpers, and no longer eventing, I wonder if professionals will make themselves available to school horses at the event. If you know any event riders going that ride professionally, please let me know.

upnoverfarm
Oct. 30, 2007, 02:53 PM
Hi Craig, I just stumbled onto this thread and thought I'd offer some help if you need it. Your place is coming along beautifully and I'm quite excited to hear that you will try to have the sale at the new farm. If you need any extra room for anything feel free to use our fields. We may be bringing a horse or two to the sale as well so I'll look forward to seeing you there. Again the place is wonderful and I know all that show up will be impressed. Good luck and if you need anything just shout up the hill towards Up and Over Farm! :winkgrin:

SummerPiper
Dec. 7, 2007, 09:48 AM
There has been an ongoing thread about this topic, search topic and you should find a lot of info!

cteventing
Jan. 7, 2008, 11:07 PM
Thank you to everyone who has posted about the Aiken Event Horse Sale. I think most of the questions that I have seen posted on previous threads can be answered by visiting the sale website at www.aikeneventhorsesale.com.

To briefly answer two of the most common concerns, it is a sale, not an auction, and there will be a sales catalogue.

I'm pleased to note that the first entries have arrived in the mail. Only time will tell what the AEHS has to offer Buyers in the way of horses for sale. However, early indications suggest that we will have a broad range of horses to choose from, both in terms of price and experience.

To demonstrate this belief, and speaking only for myself, I know that I will offer for sale: 1) a very well bred American TB filly who is nominated for the Breeders Cup and jumps as nice as any horse I've ever started, 2) a NZ-bred gelding who seems like he'll make a very nice YR's horse, and 3) a paint draft horse who should win good ribbons at novice and training for an amateur. If that's not a broad range of types, I don't know what is!

On a final note to everyone planning on attending, please be sure to register with the sale early and make hotel reservations as soon as possible. Aiken is very busy that time of year!

See you in February.
Craig

aiken4horses
Jan. 10, 2008, 10:25 PM
Thanks so much for the info. Looking forward to coming.

ThirdCharm
Jan. 11, 2008, 07:16 AM
I noticed it said "if you need stabling, contact Full Gallop Farm" on the website.... does that mean that unless being 'presented', horses will be hanging about the trailer parking? Every sale I've been to, you have stalls, people can come by and see your horse all day if they're interested, etc. etc.... this might put a crimp in my plan to bring several horses. I'm not sure I want to leave my green baby in parking all day.....

Jennifer

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 17, 2008, 05:49 PM
So who has entered their horse in the Aiken Sale so far?

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 17, 2008, 09:01 PM
Ouch... OK, so who is going to the sale as a buyer with credit letter in hand?

aiken4horses
Jan. 17, 2008, 10:18 PM
I thinking everyone's lurking - waiting for someone else to make the first post!

ThirdCharm
Jan. 17, 2008, 11:00 PM
Well, I haven't mailed them yet but I have two definites going, a Novice pony and a 4 yo pinto ISH. Also probably taking my 13 yo Prelim schoolmistress and a 16.2 TB who is doing BN.

Jennifer

Centuree
Jan. 17, 2008, 11:18 PM
What is this so called Aiken Sale? for those of us less knowledgeable eventers. :)

Clear Blue
Jan. 18, 2008, 12:26 AM
I know of a few trainers who are planning on bringing youngstock. I don't know any specifics though.

We decided to hold off on taking my coming four year old. The 45 day term of holding a 3% commision check (in case she sells after the sale) put me off a bit.

cteventing
Jan. 18, 2008, 07:43 AM
While we have not yet tallied the entries, we have horses entered by Mike Huber, Jan Byyny, Dennis Glaccum, Bonnie Mosser, Jon Holling, Zeb Fry, Will Faudree, Jen Simmons, Bobby Costello, and Laura Vandervliet.

A quick look at the horses shows that the sale will include everything from two-year-olds to horses with upper level mileage.

I encourage everyone to enter early to receive the greatest benefits of our advertising and promotion.

While we have a number of confirmed Buyers, many Buyers are waiting and asking to hear more about horses entered. Again, so enter your horses early!

Hope to see you in February!
Craig

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 18, 2008, 07:46 AM
One of mine will be there....Not sure if I will make it down...probably not although I want to go. I think it will be well attended with nice horses and buyers. I know my horse is a nice horse....only selling him cause I have too many and he needs to pay for some of the fencing on the new farm!

DiablosHalo
Jan. 18, 2008, 08:21 AM
Still undecided as to my 2yo ISH and my 5yo ISH. I guess I'll have to pull it together and make a decision real soon....

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 18, 2008, 11:43 AM
Centuree, Here's the link to the Aiken Sale www.aikeneventhorsesale.com (http://www.aikeneventhorsesale.com/)

Daymark
Jan. 18, 2008, 11:43 AM
I know of three youngsters (yearling, 2 y/o and 3 y/o) that are definitely going from my area. I would like to take my 3 y/o filly. I think there will probably be a very, very wide variety of horses there.

cteventing
Jan. 19, 2008, 12:57 AM
I forgot to mention, we also have horses entered from Sharon White and Darren Chiachia. I think it's fair to say that anyone would be hard pressed to see as many nice horses and such a variety of horses in one place over two days as the Aiken Event Horse Sale will offer.

Craig

frugalannie
Jan. 19, 2008, 08:40 AM
Craig, will a list of horses offered be generated prior to the sale so a potential buyer knows if there are candidates that meet their criteria? Or will a buyer only know what's there when they arrive?

cteventing
Jan. 19, 2008, 10:04 AM
Hi,

Just want to clarify about the transaction fee. Upon arriving at the sale, Sellers will write a check for 3.5% of the reserve price. We will hold on to that check for forty five days. If the horse is sold within in forty five days, we deposit the check. If the horse is not sold within forty five days of the sale, we destroy the check. If the horse is sold for more than the reserve price, we still only get 3.5% of the reserve price. If the horse is sold for less than the reserve price, we still get 3.5% of the reserve price.

We will have an online sale catalogue. It will be available on February 7th. The sooner we have entries in hand the sooner the catalogue will be available. I encourage all potential Buyers to join our email list to stay updated.

CRT

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 21, 2008, 07:54 PM
Craig,

Is stabling where the sale is being held? How about hook-ups? I know the website said to contact a farm in regard to both.

ThirdCharm
Jan. 21, 2008, 07:58 PM
That made me go "Huh?" too... I've never been to a sale where the horses were not stabled on-site for buyers to look over at their leisure!! And would not be thrilled about the prospect of three of my four horses hanging about the trailer at any given time..... esp the 4 yo!!

Jennifer

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 21, 2008, 08:56 PM
At the trailer??????? :eek: That won't be happening... long gone are the days where my horses don't have a nice bedded stall with lots of hay whenever we do anything away from our farm. I hope that's not the case or that puts a big snafu in my plan on bringing horses.

Craig, say it ain't so...

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 22, 2008, 09:03 AM
Craig, Sent you a PM.

Daymark
Jan. 22, 2008, 11:59 AM
The information I have been given is that there is not any stabling available on the sale grounds, and that Lara Anderson at Full Gallop Farm is full. She has given me a couple of other phone numbers of places very close by to check and see if they have stalls available. I have called and left messages and haven't heard anything back. It may be a great opportunity for those who live in Aiken to bring their horses to the sale and then back home at night, but for those who live any distance away, it is a different story.

I received this response in an e-mail when asking about stabling, the layout of the property/logistics:

"The day parking for trailers will be comparable to events. Horses will
be shown in hand on a firm surface and under tack if suitable in a
sand ring and jump field. This is an event horse sale, not a yearling
sale. While young stock are welcome, the facility is designed with
going or potential event horses in mind."

I understand their reasoning for this, but now instead of four horses coming from my area, it looks like there will be one. :(
Edited to add: They have done a great job of advertising and promoting the sale and I'm sure that has been expensive to do, but this seems to be one issue that was not thought out very well.

equinelaw
Jan. 22, 2008, 01:13 PM
http://www.aikenhorsesonline.com/message_board.html? Is the local BB for Aiken, Lots of stalls posted there. The BB also has regular classifieds with more stalls advertised.

The fact that Lara is full means there are going to be a LOT of horses at the sale! That means a lot of buyers will be interested in coming too.

I have a friend who has excellent stalls for day rental too. PM for contact info.

If one posted on the Aiken BB for people to hold extra horses for the 2 days of the sale, I would not be suprised if many people offered to help for $$$$.

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 22, 2008, 01:29 PM
We'd be coming from Florida... so not good.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 22, 2008, 01:37 PM
There are quite a few places near by that you can get stabling for a week or more. I know of one that is available that has turn out and a small room (for people). If you have a youngster that is undersaddle....Aiken is great to bring them both to the sale...and then if they don't sell, stick around for a week and go do some schooling. Lots of nice courses available for x-c schooling. If they are going to be event horses....they have to learn about hanging out on a trailer. At the FEH finals at Morven....most did not have stalls and seemed to do pretty well chilling in the trailer. My trailer converts to two box stalls and I anticipate in the future taking youngsters to day shows and let them hang out in the box stall on the trailer.

I think being the first time for this sale....there will likely be some bugs that need to be worked out.

DiablosHalo
Jan. 22, 2008, 01:48 PM
This is not an actual event- where horses are in or tied to trailers for hours and used to it. This is a sale that invited young stock to participate.

I for one will not bring my just turned two year old (that's barely been off the farm) and ask him to stand on a van - alone- all day. Especially after driving for 12 hours to get there.

I'm not real sure about the other two either. Though a smidgen older, they are still not 'going' horses. All three of mine are greenies and were priced to sell. But are not experienced enough to stand on a van all day without knowing what is going on and not having an older babysitter to stand in there with them.

Wow. One would think they'd have at least temp stalls on the grounds? It'd be a bit more understandable if there was one big farm hosting alllllllll the stalls- so buyers could travel there to see them or talk to owners? But I don't think there is a way to make this a good deal for my youngsters? Anyone with more experience have any ideas?

Well...i'm at least interested to see how this whole saga turns out. As previously posted, they've put a ton of time and advertising out there. Supposed to be a very good sale- but maybe it should have only been advertised for going-horses, not the up and coming?

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 22, 2008, 02:54 PM
This is not an actual event- where horses are in or tied to trailers for hours and used to it. This is a sale that invited young stock to participate.



I guess it just depends on your horses and goals. My horse going to the sale is a going horse....but I've taken 2 and 3 year olds to shows before....some alone and others with company. Mostly to teach them how to stand on a trailer and get use to going to a show. My 3 year old went down to Morven (for the FEI championships) alone (3 hours) and was fine...it was his 4th time off the farm.....I hung out with him and let him chill with me most of the time but many others at the event were standing on the trailer just fine. We drove home that day as well (he settled enough to eat an entire hay bag on the way home). I decided that was less stressful then stabling at a strange farm for this horse. If I was coming a longer distance....I would be coming up a couple of days earlier to let my horses settle and recover from the trip (and leave a day or two later), and view hanging out on the trailer at the sale as a training experience. If I thought that they needed a babysitter....I would bring one. I would also make sure that I had enough help with me to have someone at the trailer at all times. But how do you teach them about going to shows and standing on a trailer unless you take them places.

Temp. stalls might be nice....although I've personally had more horses get into trouble in them then I've had with the trailer (that they are familar with) so I suspect that it is somewhat each person's personal experience.

But if it isn't right for you or your horses....I also understand....12 hours is a long trip and I'm not sure I would do it even with a going horse unless he was already going to be in the area for competitions.

Daymark
Jan. 22, 2008, 03:21 PM
One thing that I think we are all leaving out of this equation is the weather. If it is pouring down rain, are there buyers who are going to want to walk from trailer to trailer in the rain and look at horses standing in the trailer or tied to the trailer? Yep, I'm sure there are some die-hards that would, but that probably won't be the norm. I'm sure everyone who lives in the southeast knows that saying, "If you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes, it will probably change". I could be 65 and sunny or 35 and sleeting/raining.

There is something about a rain date on the website saying that it will be pushed back a day, I think, but nobody knows more than a couple of days a head of time what the weather is going to be, and by that time you've already sent in your $225 as a seller, gotten your health certificate and are faced with the fact that the projected temperature will be 35 and raining. Yes, you are faced with that when attending a show, but this is a sale, not a show, not everyone there will be on a horse and riding for 20-35 minutes and then can go tuck their horse in the stall and stay out of the weather.

I just wish they were able to hold the sale at a venue where there is adequate stabling and a covered arena. I really, really want this sale to succeed and that it turn out to be a positive experience for all involved, so I am hoping that maybe something can be done about the venue. I mean, after all, they are charging, IMHO, a fee to sellers that should warrant fairly decent amenities on the sale grounds, not just an open field where you tie your horse to the trailer.

ThirdCharm
Jan. 22, 2008, 03:53 PM
http://www.aikenhorsesonline.com/message_board.html?
The fact that Lara is full means there are going to be a LOT of horses at the sale! That means a lot of buyers will be interested in coming too.


Is Full Gallop exclusively contracted to provide stabling for the sale? It might also have something to do with the fact that Full Gallop rents stalls for visiting trainers, other events (like Paradise, which is that weekend), etc..

Personally I take youngstock to shows and other venues for "experience hanging out". But, I don't usually pay a couple hundred dollars for the privilege or bring along several other horses and have to pay a "spectator fee" for multiple grooms to keep an eye on them. And I leave when my horse is done, which in this instance would mean, leaving the potential buyers behind.

Hmmm. Will have to think about this. Very likely the most expensive of my sale horses will be staying home, since he's also the least experienced. Pity.

Jennifer

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 22, 2008, 04:04 PM
Personally I take youngstock to shows and other venues for "experience hanging out". But, I don't usually pay a couple hundred dollars for the privilege or bring along several other horses and have to pay a "spectator fee" for multiple grooms to keep an eye on them. And I leave when my horse is done, which in this instance would mean, leaving the potential buyers behind.



don't disagree with you....but I've never had multiple grooms. If I have one, I'm lucky....most events I'm alone but if I have a youngster, I try and have another set of hands so there can be someone at the trailer the whole time....at least until I trust them. Last time....it was my mom, not sure I will do that again :lol:

I really hope it goes well. I'm more stuck on the 45 day thing for the commission then anything else. I understand the reasoning....just trying to decide if it is worth it for this particular horse since he is actively competing. If he doesn't sell at the sale....but sells in 45 days it would likely be because of his competitions, not the Aiken sale.

Horseless1
Jan. 22, 2008, 04:52 PM
I've been watching this play out over the last few months. I love the idea, but I do think a bit still needs to be worked out.

Can't the organizers just stipulate that if the horse sells in 30 days (site has been updated to that number) to someone who was AT the sale, then you have to pay the fee. It's not really fair to make a seller pay that fee if they meet someone two weeks later that had nothing to do with the sale...

Although if the horse did find an interested buyer two weeks later that was in no way involved with the sale, the seller could tell the buyer about the fee and I'm sure the buyer would wait two weeks to save the seller that fee. I know I would... Then again, how can the organizers find out if a horse sold in 30 days? Isn't it up to the seller to be honest?

On the stabling issue, as a buyer I thought the horses would be stalled with some kind of identification/map so that I could tell which horse was which. I guess they expect buyers to watch the jog, then find the horses they like at their trailers somehow?

On one hand it's nice to know the horses can hang at a trailer like at an event, but it seems a bit disorganized to try to find the sellers you want to talk to. BUT, the offsite stabling is actually a positive for one of my other big issues with the rules - the fact that a buyer's guest can't ride a horse. If a horse is stabled offsite then my guest - my trainer - could try the horse there - which is what I really want to have happen before I spend my hard-earned money (which is in my account as stated in my letter of credit dated within 10 days:winkgrin: )

I've never been to Aiken can anybody tell me how far the stabling farm is from where the sale is?

equinelaw
Jan. 22, 2008, 04:53 PM
To be fair the the Sale organizers, we just don't have indoors or covered arenas down here with lots of stabling too. There is only 1 place that would fit that bill and it might cost several thousand dollors a day to rent.

That would be ideal, but the whole point of Aiken is that you don't need an indoor:)

There are stalls avilaible in Aiken at several nice places. Racetrackers get off work by 11:00 am so there are experienced horse holders around too. Maybe if they allowed grooms in for free or something?

flyingtails
Jan. 22, 2008, 04:59 PM
don't disagree with you....but I've never had multiple grooms. If I have one, I'm lucky....most events I'm alone but if I have a youngster, I try and have another set of hands so there can be someone at the trailer the whole time....at least until I trust them. Last time....it was my mom, not sure I will do that again :lol:

I really hope it goes well. I'm more stuck on the 45 day thing for the commission then anything else. I understand the reasoning....just trying to decide if it is worth it for this particular horse since he is actively competing. If he doesn't sell at the sale....but sells in 45 days it would likely be because of his competitions, not the Aiken sale.

Ultimately this seems a question for the organizers to answer but I believe that only holds if he was sold to a buyer that saw him at Aiken. Hence why they are asking people to register. I used to do the same thing when I sold real estate. If you wanted to terminate the listing contract or buyer agent contract fine, but if your house sells to a buyer that saw it while it was listed with me ,(or if you as a buyer buy a house I showed you as your buyer's agent) within 60 days, you owe me a comission. Its a called a procuring cause clause. Another words who was the procuring cause of the sale? Since your horse is cometing, if the person who buys him did not see him for the first time in Aiken it shouldn't apply. All they would have to do is check their registry to see if this person was even at the sale.

Daymark
Jan. 22, 2008, 05:03 PM
To be fair the the Sale organizers, we just don't have indoors or covered arenas down here with lots of stabling too. There is only 1 place that would fit that bill and it might cost several thousand dollors a day to rent.

Do they know for certain that it would cost that much?? Several thousand dollars seems like a bit of a stretch for two days since the facility would also make money by renting stalls. If having that type of a facility makes a difference by more than ten horses, then that is $2,250 that they could have brought in. I understand that Craig wants to have the sale at his farm, but if the facility is not adequate, then wouldn't it serve the greater good to have it somewhere that is.

Yes, the weather in Aiken is for the most part great and I really really hope that it is absolutely wonderful for these two days! :)

bornfreenowexpensive
Jan. 22, 2008, 05:07 PM
Ultimately this seems a question for the organizers to answer but I believe that only holds if he was sold to a buyer that saw him at Aiken.

If that is the case...it doesn't bother me as much. Although, 45 days is a bit long.

Clear Blue
Jan. 22, 2008, 05:15 PM
I am curious how this set up will be for the buyers. Will they be satisified with just having a horse presented to them?

Having a permanent stall gives one an opportunity to present information to potential buyers (pictures from shows, schooling, score sheets, info on successful siblings, etc..). It is a great place to present video's or dvd's stall side (w/ a VCR or a laptop ). Typically it is an easy place to start a PPE - if so desired.

The stabling assignments can be made in advance and a directory can be printed as a "day sheet" addition to the sale catalogue. This makes it much easier for buyers to find the horses they are interested in.

Horseless1
Jan. 22, 2008, 05:37 PM
If that is the case...it doesn't bother me as much. Although, 45 days is a bit long.


The site now says 30 days... I've found that the info keeps switching and they don't really announce it. I just check the site every now and then to see if they make changes based on everyone's coments :)

equinelaw
Jan. 22, 2008, 05:48 PM
The facility I am speaking of, the only one I know of that has stalls and a covered arena, is not a barn--its only a venue. last time I checked it cost $4k day and included all the stalls and grounds. I assumed it might be cheaper for a weekday event? Its like FRying Pan Park or teh VA Horse Center--just a facility to rent out--no profit from more or less horses.

It is also 40 miles from the farm where horses could be tried on X-country. The only other covered arena in the area would not have stalls or even room for the trailers and has no x-country at all.

Anyway, with the advertising and food and work and insurance, I do not think the Aiken Sale will show a bit of profit as it is, so 10 more horses would mean 10 horses worth of less debt--not more profit.

Its not ideal, but some big name trainers are bringing lots of horses so I guess they are used to rain and standing around?

The organizers are checking these threads out and are making what seems to be changes to please everyone, but a covered arena is just not possible.

Has anyone asked them if the horses can be examined off the grounds at FG or wherever? I have no idea if that is not allowed or not.

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 22, 2008, 06:40 PM
I just wish they were able to hold the sale at a venue where there is adequate stabling and a covered arena. I really, really want this sale to succeed and that it turn out to be a positive experience for all involved, so I am hoping that maybe something can be done about the venue. I mean, after all, they are charging, IMHO, a fee to sellers that should warrant fairly decent amenities on the sale grounds, not just an open field where you tie your horse to the trailer.

Agreed, you all know I've thought this was a great idea from the beginning... but my braided horse standing at the trailer for two days seems not quite the "experience" it could have been for shoppers if there were stalls. So horses will be spread out all over the place, in regards to stabling, since the main farm is full that they're recommending... they're also booking for some other event I was told...?????? So how do buyers see the horses before hand to make that final decision on whether to try the horse or not... I could care less about a covered arena, but stalls on the sale ground seem imperative to a successful event.

As I said earlier, I'm coming from FL, and I'm lucky I can put ours in a box stall on the rig so she's comfortable... but I can't imagine everyone has that luxury. With that said, I'm only able to bring my one, not two, like I had planned originally... and that's only if I can find nice stabling close to the sale. I've emailed several people and am waiting for responses.

Hoping for a lovely event that sales lots of horses...

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 22, 2008, 06:49 PM
Having a permanent stall gives one an opportunity to present information to potential buyers (pictures from shows, schooling, score sheets, info on successful siblings, etc..). It is a great place to present video's or dvd's stall side w/ a VCR or a laptop ). Typically it is an easy place to start a PPE - if so desired.

The stabling assignments can be made in advance and a directory can be printed as a "day sheet" addition to the sale catalogue. This makes it much easier for buyers to find the horses they are interested in.

Exactly... I know the organizers won't be able to make everyone happy, you never can. STABLING seems like one of the NEEDS for an event like this. Can they get tents in for the event...? There's plenty of time still. I know I would pay more for the convenience of having my horse there the whole time - to be able to utilize our marketing resources without having to break it down daily from the trailer.

Duramax
Jan. 22, 2008, 07:05 PM
Surprised its not just being held at Lara's (Full Gallop). Granted she doesn't have an actual "ring"... but you don't need one in Aiken. Thats the appeal!

Daymark
Jan. 22, 2008, 08:43 PM
Its not ideal, but some big name trainers are bringing lots of horses so I guess they are used to rain and standing around?

But many of these big name trainers are already in Aiken for the season. It is not like they are traveling down to Aiken specifically for this sale and then going home. If they are leasing a barn for the season and entering their horses in the sale, then it's not that big of a deal since they already are right there.
It is more of an issue for those with more than a one hour drive,

ThirdCharm
Jan. 22, 2008, 08:56 PM
don't disagree with you....but I've never had multiple grooms.

Oh, heck, neither do I, but usually I have several students who are competing.... so at least SOME help. And usually I would not take four horses if it was JUST ME! :-) I was planning on bringing one other person to the sale.... but with the horses left at the trailer, that makes me a little uncomfortable!

Jennifer

Horseless1
Jan. 22, 2008, 09:43 PM
Has anyone asked them if the horses can be examined off the grounds at FG or wherever? I have no idea if that is not allowed or not.

Who knows how all this will pan out. They can't dictate everything! If I like a horse and the seller wants me to buy the horse, and I want my trainer to try the horse, then I bet somehow that will happen. If you aren't on the grounds of the sale, and it's not during sale hours, how can they tell you what you can and can't do? I think a seller is smart enough to decide who they want riding their horse.

I just think it's ridiculous that they're saying a trainer (who is there as your guest) can't try a horse. Heck, I'd probably pay the buyer fee for my trainer just to try a horse for me. But my trainer has a billion things to do in a day, so the idea of her running down to the bank to get a letter of credit to pretend to be a buyer makes me laugh!

I know they want to keep any lookie-lou from hopping on a horse, but are they serious? What if some kid is looking at a 50k horse and the parents want their trainer to ride it to make sure it's the right match for the kid, they aren't going to allow it? I would think they'd rather have all parties be satisfied.

I guess for me the bottom line is if they aren't going to make guidelines that make the buyers and sellers happy, then buyers and sellers won't be showing up.

Daymark
Jan. 23, 2008, 02:00 PM
Platinum Equestrian:
At the trailer??????? That won't be happening... long gone are the days where my horses don't have a nice bedded stall with lots of hay whenever we do anything away from our farm. I hope that's not the case or that puts a big snafu in my plan on bringing horses.

Craig, say it ain't so...

Did you ever get an answer?

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 23, 2008, 03:25 PM
Did you ever get an answer?


I emailed him direct yesterday and he emailed back saying to contact Lara. I did, even though I had already heard that she was full, and she confirmed that she is indeed full. I've contacted several other local farms and have only heard back from one, a COTHER by the way...

I'm hoping they see the light and add tent stabling to the sale site - if they don't, I think a lot will be lost, especially if their goal is to have a top notch sale.

Hoping for the best if we can find a stall in the area.

cteventing
Jan. 23, 2008, 09:51 PM
Thanks to everyone who has expressed an interest in the Aiken Event Horse Sale. Though I will try my best to respond to the various items raised within this forum, I'm sure to miss a few. Here goes:

There will be a sales catalogue, both online prior to the sale and in print at the sale. We will be posting the most recent update of the online version within the next day or so. It currently includes 31 horses of all shapes, sizes, prices and flavors.

There is no stabling available on the sale grounds. Individuals who are still looking for stalls should contact us directly at aikeneventhorsesale@gmail.com. Include your arrival date, departure date, and the number of stalls needed. We'll do our best, but no guarantees.

Many people have been to sales in the past. Those sales included onsite stabling. This one doesn't. It might in the future, but it doesn't at this time. If your horse can't handle getting on and off the trailer or being held through out the day as if at a horse show, then this isn't the sale for you.

Your trainer can come. Buyer and Seller registration includes admittance for one guest. Bring your trainer as your guest. Already have a guest? Your trainer can come as a spectator. Spectator entry costs $25 and admits the spectator to both days of the sale. He or she need not be registered as a buyer or provide a letter of credit. They must, however, check in at the office upon arrival and sign a release if they will be sitting on horses.

The schedule will continue to be fine tuned up until the start of the sale. We might even modify it during the sale. Who knows? It's a work in progress.

The site will be open for schooling and check in on Tuesday, February 19th from 1 to 3 pm. The site will be open for hacking at the walk, trot and canter for an hour or two on the morning of February 20th.

As at a a CCI, there will be an in hand presentation of all the horses first thing in the morning on the first day. If you don't know what this means, please inquire for guidelines. If you need a professional braider, please inquire in advance. Sellers will then be allowed a scheduled time to show off their horse. How a seller chooses to do so is their decision. There will be room to flat a horse in the sand ring, as well as a couple show jumps. There will be a course of show jumps on the grass. There will be a water jump, bank, ditch and other cross country jumps. For buyers, all of this will be visible from one primary location.

Buyers will have the opportunity to try horses first in the sand ring, and then if appropriate, over the show jumps and cross country jumps.

The second day will mirror this format but without the in hand presentation. It will provide a second chance to either watch or try horses, or consider horses overlooked the first day.

Sellers will write a check equal to 3.5% of the reserve price to the Aiken Event Horse Sale. If the horse is sold for more or less than the reserve, we still only get 3.5% of the reserve. The checks will be held for 45 days. At one point there was a typo on the website that said 30 days, but it was a typo. If the horse isn't sold during the 45 day period, we'll tear up the check. If the horse is sold, we'll deposit it.

We don't expect many, if any, sales to be completed in the 2 days of the sale. What we do expect is that sellers and buyers will come together and the transaction will be completed in the days following the sale.

If you have any reservations about the sale, or about being a seller or buyer, please consider coming as a spectator this year. You can always come as a buyer or seller next year.

Aiken is a great horse town. Sometimes it's a great horse town where the sun shines. On other occasions it's a great horse town where it rains. Sometimes it's warm, other times it's cold. If the weather is really bad, we'll all sit tight and try again later. Or maybe the next day.

We won't be moving the sale to a site that has an indoor. Eventing doesn't take place in an indoor, and neither will our sale of event horses.

If any of these facts make you feel uncomfortable, then please come as a spectator this year. We'll be doing it again next year, and we'll probably be better at it next year, so maybe you'll decide to come as a buyer or seller then. But if you want to see a bunch of nice horses showing off at a great venue sooner rather than later, then do please come. We'd love to have you.

Craig

Horseless1
Jan. 24, 2008, 09:10 AM
Thanks so much for the answers.



Your trainer can come. He or she need not be registered as a buyer or provide a letter of credit. They must, however, check in at the office upon arrival and sign a release if they will be sitting on horses.
Very happy with that change!!!



There will be a sales catalogue, both online prior to the sale and in print at the sale. We will be posting the most recent update of the online version within the next day or so. It currently includes 31 horses of all shapes, sizes, prices and flavors.
I'm looking forward to seeing the great horses that will be there so I can make my travel plans! :)

Moderator 1
Jan. 24, 2008, 09:14 AM
Just a reminder to everyone not to post specifics of the horses for sale on this board as it would violate our advertising policy. Feel free to continue to discuss the sale in general--logistics, etc.

Thanks!

Daymark
Jan. 29, 2008, 05:38 PM
Hey y'all,

they have posted an update on the aehs website.

Platinum Equestrian
Jan. 29, 2008, 06:23 PM
What is the change?

PS - We're no longer taking our irish mare to the sale...

BigRuss1996
Jan. 29, 2008, 06:46 PM
The online catalog is up.... looks some nice horses will be there....




What is the change?

PS - We're no longer taking our irish mare to the sale...

ThirdCharm
Jan. 29, 2008, 08:52 PM
Wow, maybe I should raise the prices on the horses I'm taking. Whoooo!

Jennifer

cteventing
Jan. 30, 2008, 07:47 AM
The wait is over; the Aiken Event Horse Sale Catalog is online! In terms of experience, it includes everything from two-year olds through horses with Advanced mileage. With respect to price, the entries range from four digits to 6 figures. We will continue to update the catalog as additional entries come in and as more information is available on individual entries.

For those coming to town prior to the sale and looking for activities, the USET winter training session will be taking place on Monday and Tuesday, the Pine Top Horse Trials is the weekend before the sale, and the Paradise Horse Trials is the weekend after the sale. Make your travel plans now for a great week in Aiken!

kdail
Jan. 30, 2008, 12:15 PM
Can someone post a link to the catalog? Thanks!

BigRuss1996
Jan. 30, 2008, 12:47 PM
It's on the Aiken Event horse sale site....

www.aikeneventhorsesale.com

then you go to the top and click on online sale catalog....

frugalannie
Jan. 30, 2008, 02:53 PM
Thank you for posting and PMing this info.

Jleegriffith
Jan. 30, 2008, 03:06 PM
Just curious but I didn't see any pictures with the catalog. Is this planned for the future? The list of horses is very impressive!

Maybe
Jan. 30, 2008, 03:53 PM
Why the secret identities? I would want to know the horse's name, consignor's name etc. so I could do some investigation. If I were a buyer, I want to check a horses competition record etc., before I got there. Any sale I have ever been to lists all the info. ??

Xctrygirl
Jan. 30, 2008, 10:02 PM
I don't know.... with those reserve prices and this economy.... well I just don't want to take bets on how many empty trailers will be leaving the sale area.


~Emily

ThirdCharm
Jan. 30, 2008, 10:47 PM
I sent in a couple cheaper ones... :-) one with signif. experience....

Jennifer

FrittSkritt
Jan. 31, 2008, 11:10 AM
Well, I know who the $150K ISH is based on the results given...

flyingchange
Feb. 1, 2008, 10:09 AM
I just looked at it. Where is the consignor name? Pedigree (if known)? Competition dates and results if competing?

Not impressed....

tx3dayeventer
Feb. 1, 2008, 10:19 AM
Well, I know who the $150K ISH is based on the results given...

I wouldnt have thought she would sell him. But for that as a starting price I guess I might sell too.

lovemytbs
Feb. 1, 2008, 10:46 AM
As a seller I would want my horses photo on the site and certainly want to see some photos as a buyer. I agree with the above posters, I am not impressed either. USEA numbers, names, records, owner's name, should be included.

Catalina
Feb. 1, 2008, 02:15 PM
As a seller I would want my horses photo on the site and certainly want to see some photos as a buyer. I agree with the above posters, I am not impressed either. USEA numbers, names, records, owner's name, should be included.


Especially with those reserve prices :).

Erin Pittman
Feb. 1, 2008, 04:24 PM
Ah, but if they put the pictures, and all that other information, people could bypass the sale and go directly to the source, right? Thereby bypassing the commission and buyer's entry fee/required letter of credit, etc. That'd be my guess as to why that info is not there. Steuart *might* send a couple of horses down...

Equibrit
Feb. 1, 2008, 04:28 PM
OTTBs for $20,000.00.

Does anybody have "dumb" written on their forehead?

ss3777
Feb. 1, 2008, 04:47 PM
I don't want to throw any "rocks" at this sale. It sounds like a great idea and I hope it grows over the next few years. If I had the time, I would be down as a spectator. Good luck Aiken Event horse people :)

My OTTB is worth a lot more than 20,000 to me :)

LKF
Feb. 1, 2008, 05:04 PM
Equibrit- What does it matter if the Thoroughbred is off the track? Do you think an ex-race horse can't be worth $20K? Not all the horses entered in the sale are ex-race horses. There is a nice variety entered, with a terrific group of owners and folks who are working extremely hard to make it a success. The horses entered are different breeds, some are prospects and some are seasoned campaigners. As for ex-race horses, they can be priced from $0 to $1M depending upon pedigree, soundness, conformation, movement, talent, brains, mileage in the show ring, if it's won any money prizes, etc. It all depends upon what a person is looking for.

Horseless1
Feb. 1, 2008, 05:25 PM
I was hoping for a picture and a name to look up records...

kookicat
Feb. 1, 2008, 06:14 PM
Is it just me or do the prices seem on the high side?

Interesting idea- I agree that more info would be good. The WB sales give pedigree info and pics, and they work out okay.

martyc
Feb. 1, 2008, 06:45 PM
OTTBs for $20,000.00.

Does anybody have "dumb" written on their forehead?

Dumb? I personally know an OTTB bought for 20K nine years ago. He was three months off the tracks and WTC and just started over fences. He went on to do Burghley and Rolex twice each, clean. Sounds like a bargain.

Equibrit
Feb. 1, 2008, 07:24 PM
Dream on!

CoolMeadows
Feb. 1, 2008, 07:34 PM
Why can't a horse off the track be 20k or more?? I know a few that I've sold have been resold within two years for far more than that and one that I sold who'll never be resold as his new owner's already turned down 65k. Why is that surprising? A nice horse is a nice horse is a nice horse no matter what it is.

martyc
Feb. 1, 2008, 07:47 PM
Dream on!

Are you referring to anyone paying that price for an OTTB, or if an OTTB can go on to 4* successes? If the horse were an ISH or an import from France or NZ, would 20K suddenly seem reasonable to you? North American horses can be fabulous, give them some credit.

Laurel&HollyFarm
Feb. 1, 2008, 11:12 PM
I have an OTTB that was valued at $30,000 not too many years off the track. Lucky for me he had an injury that kept him from competing over training level and therefore brought his price down to my level :D.

Miss Perfect
Feb. 1, 2008, 11:23 PM
Steuart Pittman's Salute The Truth is an ottb.

tuppysmom
Feb. 2, 2008, 12:04 AM
This sale is a fab idea. I certainly hope to be there next year with horses to sell. They are OTTBs though.

Didn't quite get the ducks lined up for a winter in the south this year. We're paying for it with record bad weather, yuck.

LKF
Feb. 2, 2008, 06:01 AM
The problem that I've discovered through the years as I train and sell Thoroughbreds (some unraced and some who are ex-racers) is dealing with people who are not educated in the market.
Problem #1 people try to compare horses and their prices to horses that are being offered for sale on rescue sites such as CANTER. I run into this often and am amazed at their ignorance
Problem #2 the rescue sites do cheapen the value of a Thoroughbred on the open market and make it difficult for other farms to market and sell their stock at a higher value. But that's called "capitalism" folks! That's what makes the USA a great country.
Problem #3 it's usually uneducated/ignorant people who make the dim-witted comments, " I can go to CANTER and buy a TB for $800! Why would I spend $20K?" Their most likely Novices attempting to pass themselves off as experienced horsemen.
Now Equibrit, if you feel that you could do any better on your own and purchase a cheap TB, then it's your right to do so. But you need to be careful not to splash a broad brush over the topic with your weak attempt to cheapen the Thoroughbreds at the sale. If you can't afford them, then you're still welcome to join the activities as a spectator.
As for Thoroughbreds, if you've never owned one, I hope you will one day. If you've never sat on one in the starting gate and felt the incredible power pull you as the gates swing open, then you don't know what you're missing. If you never rode one who would burst his heart for you rather than give up trying, then you'll never truly 'get it'.

pwynnnorman
Feb. 2, 2008, 06:21 AM
Ah, but if they put the pictures, and all that other information, people could bypass the sale and go directly to the source, right? Thereby bypassing the commission and buyer's entry fee/required letter of credit, etc. That'd be my guess as to why that info is not there. Steuart *might* send a couple of horses down...

This I don't get. There are ways to prevent that--the Pony Finals Sale consignment contract includes a lot of stiff language and fees to make sure the sale still gets its share. Also the AQHA industry does it all the time. Why can't we learn from each other? I'm really disappointed in the catalog. It would have been a great marketing and pricing tool if it were more explicit--and would have helped others make decisions about participating in the future, too (based on the results and how they are related to catalog data).

FairWeather
Feb. 2, 2008, 06:56 AM
This I don't get. There are ways to prevent that--the Pony Finals Sale consignment contract includes a lot of stiff language and fees to make sure the sale still gets its share. Also the AQHA industry does it all the time. Why can't we learn from each other? I'm really disappointed in the catalog. It would have been a great marketing and pricing tool if it were more explicit--and would have helped others make decisions about participating in the future, too (based on the results and how they are related to catalog data).

Agreed--doesn't make sense considering you have to pay to enter your horse in the sale, don't you?

shamrocker
Feb. 2, 2008, 07:22 AM
I think the sale is a fabulous idea, however I do agree the catalog is way too ambiguous at this point to really attract the customers. I get the auction catalogs from Germany and they really say "come and look at me"! I hope that pictures are listed soon, and some more information about the horses is listed soon. For the prices they are asking, more specifics need to be given to interested buying parties like me!

Hannahsmom
Feb. 2, 2008, 09:25 AM
I think the sale is a great idea as it is so hard to find a lot of nice horses in one place. I hope this catches on and becomes a broader range of horses. For me, right now, the catalog is a bit slim with multiple TBA prices and since there are no video or pictures to see, it doesn't convince me to commit to taking the vacation time from work during what is a very busy time for me. I'm the type that likes to see the horse for myself before I purchase rather than just rely on a coach.

I will be interested in what people have to say about the experience and it might convince me to go next year.

Equibrit
Feb. 2, 2008, 09:34 AM
The problem that I've discovered through the years as I train and sell Thoroughbreds (some unraced and some who are ex-racers) is dealing with people who are not educated in the market.
Problem #1 people try to compare horses and their prices to horses that are being offered for sale on rescue sites such as CANTER. I run into this often and am amazed at their ignorance
Problem #2 the rescue sites do cheapen the value of a Thoroughbred on the open market and make it difficult for other farms to market and sell their stock at a higher value. But that's called "capitalism" folks! That's what makes the USA a great country.
Problem #3 it's usually uneducated/ignorant people who make the dim-witted comments, " I can go to CANTER and buy a TB for $800! Why would I spend $20K?" Their most likely Novices attempting to pass themselves off as experienced horsemen.
Now Equibrit, if you feel that you could do any better on your own and purchase a cheap TB, then it's your right to do so. But you need to be careful not to splash a broad brush over the topic with your weak attempt to cheapen the Thoroughbreds at the sale. If you can't afford them, then you're still welcome to join the activities as a spectator.
As for Thoroughbreds, if you've never owned one, I hope you will one day. If you've never sat on one in the starting gate and felt the incredible power pull you as the gates swing open, then you don't know what you're missing. If you never rode one who would burst his heart for you rather than give up trying, then you'll never truly 'get it'.

Spoken like a true capitalist http://www.littlekentuckyfarm.com/horsesforsale_content.htm

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 2, 2008, 09:54 AM
OTTBs for $20,000.00.

Does anybody have "dumb" written on their forehead?


umm...I've sold more then two for more than that and known many many more that have sold for much more. If they have come off the track, been retrained and have a good competition record, the fact that they raced is actually a good point for eventers. It means they have been fit, been stressed more then they ever will as an event horse and stayed sound. They know how to gallop and that is a big thing in our sport.

Also, many of the full TBs listed for this sale were purpose bred. They may be all TB, but they were bred to be event or sport horses and are by well known TB sires who have produced good jumpers and event horses.

If someone more knowledgeable has gone to the track and picked up an OTTB that was a diamond in the rough...and finished that horse to make the diamond show through...you better believe that they will be able to command a high price.

Sure you can buy a cheap OTTB...I have before as well....but don't think that once you are able to show the talent that horse has that it's sale price will not increase....and don't think that every cheap OTTB will have talent.

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 2, 2008, 09:58 AM
I think the sale is a fabulous idea, however I do agree the catalog is way too ambiguous at this point to really attract the customers. I get the auction catalogs from Germany and they really say "come and look at me"! I hope that pictures are listed soon, and some more information about the horses is listed soon. For the prices they are asking, more specifics need to be given to interested buying parties like me!


I suspect that the catalog will be fuller next year. Many people are entering this sale late, the farm where the sale is being held is just being finished....and there is a lot going on in the organization of something like this. This is a hole...I'm sure that there will be more holes...but part of starting something new is working through the issues and making it better. I hope that the sale is a success this year....but expect it to be even better next year. The sale will be a success in my mind if some of these horses sell...but I will be surprised if many sell during the sale but less suprised if some of the horses sell within 30 days of the sale.

Equibrit
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:08 AM
Horses with experience should sell for more but when you advertise a horse thay can "walk, trot, canter under saddle in the ring" for $20000.00 then you NEED to convince the punters that they are worth the bucks!

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:22 AM
Horses with experience should sell for more but when you advertise a horse thay can "walk, trot, canter under saddle in the ring" for $20000.00 then you NEED to convince the punters that they are worth the bucks!


That's done by sitting on them in the case of OTTBs...Sometimes you put a price tag on them like that since you know that they have the talent and once they have competed...you will have no trouble getting that price....so it is who is going to take the risk of keeping them and expense of showing them. If they are priced at 20K but the owners think that if they have them less then a year they will be at training level and selling for 30K---it might not be worth selling them for less now. It is all a gamble and who is going to take the risk.

I know that when an unstarted purpose bred foal hits the ground, many breeders will but a 10-20K price tag on them...and people will pay that even though those horses haven't done a darn thing (of course the breeder probably already has 10K+ into that foal). That is where having a good eye comes in ....and looking at the horse thinking that you can get substantially more when they are going or that is the horse that will go to the highest levels. It is who will take the risk and expense to keep the horse long enough to prove its self.

Equibrit
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:27 AM
They are listed for auction with a reserve of $20000.00 - is that referred to as "sitting on them"?

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:34 AM
They are listed for auction with a reserve of $20000.00 - is that referred to as "sitting on them"?


No I meant...If I'm buying them, and they are priced at 20K (and going undersaddle), I will tell whether I think they are worth 20K by sitting on them myself. I wouldn't trust someone else telling me...but I wouldn't rule out that they might be worth that if I liked what I felt....but proof that they are worth that to me would come from me sitting on them.

At this sale...you will have a chance to try the horse yourself.

Erin Pittman
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:36 AM
This I don't get. There are ways to prevent that--the Pony Finals Sale consignment contract includes a lot of stiff language and fees to make sure the sale still gets its share. Also the AQHA industry does it all the time. Why can't we learn from each other? I'm really disappointed in the catalog. It would have been a great marketing and pricing tool if it were more explicit--and would have helped others make decisions about participating in the future, too (based on the results and how they are related to catalog data).

I completely agree - I just was giving it as a possible reason for why there might not be photos up. It seems strange to me, too - just based on the fact that these are such expensive horses. It'll be very interesting to see how it turns out.

adamsmom
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:46 AM
If they are priced at 20K but the owners think that if they have them less then a year they will be at training level and selling for 30K---it might not be worth selling them for less now. It is all a gamble and who is going to take the risk.

I know that when an unstarted purpose bred foal hits the ground, many breeders will but a 10-20K price tag on them...and people will pay that even though those horses haven't done a darn thing (of course the breeder probably already has 10K+ into that foal). That is where having a good eye comes in ....and looking at the horse thinking that you can get substantially more when they are going or that is the horse that will go to the highest levels. It is who will take the risk and expense to keep the horse long enough to prove its self.

Exactly. We have a lovely 5yo that we could put on the market for $5000 and probably move him right away. The thing is, he's a lovely mover, jumps whatever you put in front of him, auto-changes, etc. etc. We wouldn't consider taking less than $20K for him. We couldn't replace him for that, even if he is still green.

LKF
Feb. 2, 2008, 05:02 PM
If you're calling me a Capitalist, then "Thank You! I'll take the compliment any time. Now behave yourself Equibrit . . . you never know who may be watching you.:eek:

highlandgreen
Feb. 2, 2008, 05:19 PM
I think the sale is a great idea and will allow people to shop in one location. Good luck to the organizers and sellers who are involved.

Equibrit
Feb. 2, 2008, 05:51 PM
If you're calling me a Capitalist, then "Thank You! I'll take the compliment any time. Now behave yourself Equibrit . . . you never know who may be watching you.:eek:

Meaning?

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 2, 2008, 08:08 PM
If you're calling me a Capitalist, then "Thank You! I'll take the compliment any time. Now behave yourself Equibrit . . . you never know who may be watching you.:eek:

That is a bizarre comment to make...

cteventing
Feb. 2, 2008, 08:26 PM
Thank you to everyone who has expressed an interest in and thoughtful input on the Sale.

The two issues that have been raised in this forum that I feel need to be addressed are the prices of the horses entered in the sale and the nature of the online catalog.

With regards to prices, the Aiken Event Horse Sale has nothing to do with the value placed on any horse. That determination is left to the individual sellers. There are inexpensive horses; there are expensive horses. At the time of this writing, the price range begins at $6,000 and goes all the way to $200,000. To me that is an impressive range of horses. If you are looking for a horse, the chances are pretty good that you are looking for one somewhere in between those two figures. Horses that are listed with a price of TBA are listed as such because that is the price provided to us by the seller. We continue to try and determine accurate reserve prices for all entries. That aside, I can think of no other setting that offers the opportunity to see or try so many horses in two days. And I have spent a great deal of my professional life looking at horses for purchase or offering horses for sale, both in this country and abroad.

As to the contents of the catalog, I couldn't agree more with many of the comments. I would love to provide more information. And we will, both in online updates to our websites and in the print catalog that will be available at the sale. The online catalog went live on January 29th, a week before entries actually close. We provided this abbreviated format due to the demand for information about horses entered in the sale. The online catalog was then updated on the 30th and again on the 31st. We expect it to be updated again on February 6th, the closing date for entries. As a corollary to this thought, it's worth noting that people in eventing are a funny lot, and a quick sampling of the entries shows that the average seller chose to describe their horse in 20 words, though we offer room for up to 50. And the reality is that the majority of the entries that we have received to date are incomplete. So the catalog reflects that.

As for photos, given that we have struggled to get basic information on the majority of horses entered, we feel that getting photos in a useable format, in a timely fashion and with permission of the photographer is beyond our wildest expectations this year. Perhaps next year, when sellers are more in tune to the process, we will include photos. However, this still begs the question, "How many people have ever bought a horse solely by looking at a photo?" My guess is very, very few. I for one have never bought a horse off a photo or sold a horse off a photo, and I lost count as to the number of horses I have bought and sold when the number reached about 300.

So come look at all the horses in one place. Touch them. Sit on them. Take them for a spin. You might just find the one you're looking for.

Hope to see you all in a couple weeks.

All the best,
Craig

RunForIt
Feb. 2, 2008, 08:38 PM
After all the posts here, I was really surprised to find horses priced as low as $6000 on the catalog! Yes, at the very opposite end one for $150k and 1 for $200k...I expect those horses are in the sale for exposure. go on dreamhorse or equine.com - walk,trot,canter horses are routinely priced at $15k - often without the glamour shots so many here have found necessary.

One of the most frustrating experiences I've had with "horselife" has been horse shopping - potential horses are never clustered in one place - money traveling and staying overnight to try one horse could be spent on the HORSE! So, here's an alternative in the Aiken horse sale. As bornfreenowexpensive said, all new ventures have issues and those issues will be dealt with in this situation. I wish I was over in Aiken just to see all these potential event horses and the ones already going and doing...has this ever happened before? :cool: Kudos to CTeventing and all the commitee members! :)

sidepasser
Feb. 2, 2008, 10:21 PM
I hope the sale will be a success - it is rare that you get to go to one location and see so many horses for sale that are for one purpose.

As far as the prices..well, horses are worth what someone is willing to pay. I imagine that those that have horses to sell feel that they should recover their initial investment, their training and show experience, and still make some profit. We all know how much training costs? Right? plus board (even if you own the stalls, you still have the expenses of feed, etc.).

The only way to know what they will bring is to see how they sell. If no buyers, then that will be the telling point. I do believe though, that there will be sales, and likely in the upper ranges as well as the lower ones. It will be interesting to see how the middle holds up.

Pictures entice people to look further. Good pictures entice people to find out more and paint a story, weave a tale, and fill out the story of the pony for sale. It gives people a moment to ooh and aah and say "I want that one" and then plot and plan how to get it - lol. We have ALL been there at some point. It makes buying more fun to see beforehand what is available and what you think you may purchase.

I think it will be a fun time for those selling and buying.

Moderator 1
Feb. 3, 2008, 08:14 AM
We merged five existing threads on the Aiken sale, so please excuse any chronological oddities.

Thanks!

GotSpots
Feb. 3, 2008, 08:32 AM
Craig - I don't think folks buy a horse just off of a photograph, but they do decide to go look at a horse based on a photograph. If I was wavering about going to the sale, being able to get a better sense of who these horses were would help me assess if they were what I was looking for, since we're usually shopping for a particular horse for a particular rider, not just generally browsing. I applaud the idea of the sale - just some honest feedback.

As for looking at lots of horses in the same place, while there is a broad spectrum of horses entered here, there do not appear to be a ton within each band or range (understanding that the green OTTB who is lovely but only has w/t/c and a few small fences is a pretty different market from the amateur ride training horse). If you're willing to do the leg work, you can, in Middleburg or Unionville or many other places (heck, we did it in Toronto, of all places), knit together a day where you see 6-10 horses within your range, armed with photos, knowledge about their experience and competition records, and no elbows from other buyers. So I'd look at the sale as a chance to look at a ton of nice horses, with a wide range, and perhaps educate yourself and/or get more exposure for a horse, but if I was seriously shopping for a particular type, there's not really enough information available to make me want to plunk down $125.

Jleegriffith
Feb. 3, 2008, 08:53 AM
In response to the value of photos.

My personal opinion on photo's is that they motivate people to get off their butts and come and look. I resell many types of horses ranging from $3500 to $15k and I can tell you no matter how many I have sitting in my barn nobody is going to come look without photos and most want video. It's the nature of the market and the digitial age has changed the way people shop for horses. How many horses have I bought off photo's..well let's say it's more than ten. Honestly, I have also sold horses up to $10k horses off a picture and video. Yes, it's hard to believe and it makes me shake my head because I can't personally justify spending more than $2500 off a picture/video but many buyers will especially if they know the seller of the horse. The picture draws in the buyer and the video confirms this is the horse they want. They do paint this picture in their mind and often times vet the horse and have it shipped without even riding it. This is not the normal but it happens more than you would think.

Of course, I am buying cheap prospects but for me a photo can tell me a lot. If I see a gorgeous horse in a picture I can be motivated rather quickly to hook up my trailer and go it's just human nature:lol: The last horse I sold for CANTER was gorgeous- a true black with tons of white and the real deal as far as an upper level prospect goes. Without a picture nobody was really interested..a few good pictures and the emails became overwhelming and he wasn't a cheap ottb;)

Let's just say I have a client that has $10k to spend. We love the fact that there are all these horses in one place. It's a great idea and it's nice to be able to ride them and see them go for several days. However, only several horses are in our price range and we can't see photos, video, research records and have no idea who they belong to. It's hard to convince the client that it's worth their time when we can put together a shopping trip to see 10 or more horses in this price range within a 2hr radius of where we live and see videos, pics, and records. The buyers need something to spark their interest. Again, this is just how I feel on the subject. I often look at the catalog for the sport horse sales and the pictures make me want to go because there are some very nice horses with solid records that look the part.

Did you give the sellers the options of including photo's and video? I know how hard it is to convince sellers to take photo's and video of their horses so I feel your frustration:yes: I think the sale is a wonderful idea and hope that the concept takes off and more people attend in the following years (with pictures and details on their horses;)).

Daymark
Feb. 3, 2008, 10:31 AM
We have a lovely 5yo that we could put on the market for $5000 and probably move him right away. The thing is, he's a lovely mover, jumps whatever you put in front of him, auto-changes, etc. etc. We wouldn't consider taking less than $20K for him. We couldn't replace him for that, even if he is still green.

Now, THAT makes perfect sense. :D It all depends on how badly you wish to sell your horse or how quickly. Sometimes a price that is too low will put buyers off. It's that "well, if he is THAT cheap,. what is wrong with him"

Several years ago I had a mediocre filly that I did not wish to keep in my breeding program. I priced her fairly inexpensive and had no response. I upped her price $1500 and sold her within 30 days. EVERYBODY knows that buying horses is somewhat like purchasing a car. Not many go in expecting to pay the MSRP.

This sale is an excellent idea and I hope that it continues for many years. There will always be those "throwing rocks" at ANY idea or event no matter what,. That is their freedom to express opinions. Sometimes the opinions are constructive, sometimes they are just coming from someone with too much time on their hands and a bad outlook/attitude about everything in life anyway, no matter what it is, which I think is kind of sad. :no:

grabmaneandgo
Feb. 4, 2008, 04:54 PM
About the photos...while they're nice to look at, and make the shopping-from your-desk part fun, what exactly will a picture "tell" you about an event prospect? If it's looks that entice you, how do those looks translate into a good eventing partner? Aside from general conformation, a photo won't tell me much more than a detailed description will. What's really going to motivate me to plop down $125 as a buyer is the ability to save time and money (in gas) by being able to see these horses GO in an environment I'm hoping to put one in.

Perhaps if these were Hunters, the photos would mean a lot more.

How many of you would have passed on Teddy O'Connor if all you saw was his photo?

Clear Blue
Feb. 4, 2008, 06:09 PM
TOC's jumping photos are phenomenal.

Even if I wasn't looking - I might come to a sale if I saw some amazing jumping pics.

cteventing
Feb. 4, 2008, 09:30 PM
Just want to note that the catalog has and continues to be updated. It now includes horse and seller names, usea#s, and 2007 competition and career highlights where applicable.

Check it out at: http://aikeneventhorsesale.com/catalog.html

Entries keep coming so stay tuned!

Thanks,
Craig and Sarah

Jleegriffith
Feb. 5, 2008, 07:33 AM
Craig,
That is wonderful. Seeing the records and names makes a huge difference for me and makes the prices seem more realistic. Thank you for your hard work.

asterix
Feb. 5, 2008, 09:58 AM
About the photos...while they're nice to look at, and make the shopping-from your-desk part fun, what exactly will a picture "tell" you about an event prospect? If it's looks that entice you, how do those looks translate into a good eventing partner? Aside from general conformation, a photo won't tell me much more than a detailed description will.

Ah, but, come on, how many times do you read a description and then arrive to see a horse and it is EXACTLY as described, if not better? ;)

I take all descriptions with a huge grain of salt. Plus I have a real type that I like (big, short coupled, kind eye. hey, works for me!) -- as an ammy, I would rather buy a horse that fits my personal type than a terrific athlete who has the talent for Rolex but is not my type of horse at all.

So pics can help a buyer parse the words, if you will, and develop a first instinct on whether it might be in the ballpark.

Case in point: my new "husband horse" (ok, lower level event prospect) -- the "baby" in my sig line. This horse is a draft cross started by a foxhunter. Well, that can mean a heavy, unrefined horse that will plow over or through everything, or a sturdy, well-built horse with a good brain that has the basic athleticism to keep me entertained for the forseeable future. Horse was 3 hours away. No way would I have gone to see him without a pic so I could at least get a head start on which way he was going to turn out.

Following the run up to the sale with great interest -- hope buyers and sellers will report back!

Horseless1
Feb. 5, 2008, 10:28 AM
About the photos...while they're nice to look at, and make the shopping-from your-desk part fun, what exactly will a picture "tell" you about an event prospect? Aside from general conformation, a photo won't tell me much more than a detailed description will.

If I lived in Aiken and it was a 20 minute drive to the sale, I don't need a photo. But if people have to drive for a day (or more) or fly to Aiken and stay in a hotel, I think a photo is necessary to convince someone to make that trip.

A photo can tell you if the horse hangs his knees, is heavy on the forehand, goes xc in a snaffle, etc. And as far as looks go, one person's "cute face" is another person's "lug head". A photo lets you decide for yourself. :winkgrin:

I think the sale is a great idea since you can see so many horses in one place. And even if there aren't that many that appeal to me I bet it'll be fun to see who's trying out the $$$ horses. haha

BigRuss1996
Feb. 5, 2008, 12:26 PM
Really?.... a photo can tell you all that?....I don't think so... first most people do not take good photos of horses in ads and the ones who do I can tell you (because I have taken them myself and videos too in the past) you end up doing alot of pics before you get the one that really MAKES the horse look good ...just like with the videos.. they edit them before sending it to you so you really only see what the seller wants you to see to get you to come look. There is so much that can be hidden in a photo it isn't funny.
I think the buyers who are truely seriously looking for a horse and who have the $$ to buy these types of horses will be there. If I am able to spend 20K on a horse then I can afford to get down there and to pay $125.00 to get in with free lunches and a free cocktail party to go see over 60 horses in one place. No your average tire kicker may not want to pay to get there and to go but then...it weeds them out now doesn't it.
Would pictures be nice?...sure... are they the bee all end all...no! The big TB sales (Fasig Tipton, etc) send out catalogs (with way more horses then this) and I get them and I can tell you there are NO pictures....and guess what... lots of people go to the sales ( I've been and there have even been people from other countries there) and some of those horses sell for over a million dollars.




If I lived in Aiken and it was a 20 minute drive to the sale, I don't need a photo. But if people have to drive for a day (or more) or fly to Aiken and stay in a hotel, I think a photo is necessary to convince someone to make that trip.

A photo can tell you if the horse hangs his knees, is heavy on the forehand, goes xc in a snaffle, etc. And as far as looks go, one person's "cute face" is another person's "lug head". A photo lets you decide for yourself. :winkgrin:

I think the sale is a great idea since you can see so many horses in one place. And even if there aren't that many that appeal to me I bet it'll be fun to see who's trying out the $$$ horses. haha

grabmaneandgo
Feb. 5, 2008, 02:24 PM
So I guess it's all about what's in the photo.

I can see how zoom shots can show you some important things about a horse, and that might be do-able on their website for next year. Actually, that would be cool.

I was just thinking that the kind of photos y'all are requesting aren't feasible for a print catalog, unless they've got goads of cash to spend. Online photos would be good if they show detail and variety.

Hmmm...okay...one more mind opened. ;)

aiken4horses
Feb. 6, 2008, 08:27 PM
Anyone still looking for place to board during the sale? It's busy, busy this time of year! All my friends are full, and farming out seasonal boarders to the neighbors.
Have you tried the showgrounds, Highfields? Contact PSJ who runs the shows, maybe they'll rent some of the perm show stalls. Their info is online, Progressive Show Jumping.
Also, McGees Mile is the harness training track. They have hundreds (well, lots anyway) of Loddon box stalls, empty, for sale. They might be open to renting for a couple of nights. Not sure they have a web site, maybe online yellow pages?
Don't know - just putting the info out there for people not familiar with Aiken area.

lstevenson
Feb. 6, 2008, 11:38 PM
The big TB sales (Fasig Tipton, etc) send out catalogs (with way more horses then this) and I get them and I can tell you there are NO pictures....and guess what... lots of people go to the sales ( I've been and there have even been people from other countries there) and some of those horses sell for over a million dollars.



But those horses are purchased mostly off of bloodlines. The buyers usually already have an idea which they are going to buy before they even see them. So not really comparable in my book.

I for one, can tell a lot from a picture. And I usually won't go look at a horse for a client without seeing a picture I really like, although a video is certainly better.

I would think for a Sport horse sale, pictures in the catalog would bring a lot more potential buyers.

LKF
Feb. 7, 2008, 07:53 AM
Hopefully after the first season of the sale adjustments/improvements can be made to draw in the public for next year. I know that Sarah and Craig have done an excellent job in listening to suggestions and are doing their best to make it a success.
As for Fasig-Tipton, Keeneland sales for example, there aren't any photos of the Thoroughbreds for sale, but rather a brief description of the horse, breeding, doseage profile and racing stats. There are only TBs at these sales generally with the intention to race them, so everyone is on the same page with the same 'need' when attending these sales.
The Aiken Sale on the other hand are drawing show people, Hunter-Jumpers, Fox Hunters, Eventers, Dressage folks and possibly polo or steeplechasers. We all have different needs and expectations required in our sport, therefore a single conformation photo may be the direction to take for next year's sale and include it electronically and in hard copy.
With Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland there are people attending with BIG bucks who have gone to the sales for generations. It has a solid reputation and everyone seems to know everyone. It doesn't take a lot of time to do additional research on the horses and farms. The key to these sales is to get in early on the first day and visit the horses first hand.

flyingchange
Feb. 7, 2008, 09:24 AM
I think the buyers who are truely seriously looking for a horse and who have the $$ to buy these types of horses will be there. If I am able to spend 20K on a horse then I can afford to get down there and to pay $125.00 to get in with free lunches and a free cocktail party to go see over 60 horses in one place. No your average tire kicker may not want to pay to get there and to go but then...it weeds them out now doesn't it.



I agree with this. The nice thing about sales is that you get to see mass quantities of horses all in one location. You can see tons of horses in one day. Buyers that attend these types of sales are already commited to going to the sale and to the mechanics of the sale. Pix are great but a bit superfluous as you are already going to see these horses in person anyway.

Once you have looked through a sales catalogue with pix - the pix all start to blend after awhile. What stands out is pedigree and performance history (if horse is already competing). Photos might tell you if a horse has a cute face, and you might see some conformation flaws that turn you off ... but you have to see the horse in person to truely assess its conformation and way of going, as well as its personality.

Craig - thank you for updating the descriptions. The catalogue looks much better. I do wish that the descriptions were standardized, ie, they all contained pedigree. It is rather funny to me that some of the sellers have offered pedigree information when the sire is considered impressive (by the seller). But for other horses offered by same sellers, no pedigree information is offered at all.

I know how difficult it is to get cooperation from people such as sellers to give comlete information on horses. This is the same group of people who continually send in incomplete entries to events, LOL. So I feel for Craig in this scenario. It's not like he has 300 possible entries and can turn away certain entries that do not comply with the auction's paper requirements/requests (the way Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland can).

boppin along
Feb. 7, 2008, 09:58 AM
I'm just curious how many BUYERS have actually signed up and paid?
Is that posted anywhere?
I heard from a friend in Aiken that she heard no one had actually paid a buyers fee yet.
Now THAT would be a huge BUMMER for all!

flyingchange
Feb. 7, 2008, 10:10 AM
Yeah, that's the part that I don't get. Why is there a buyer's fee?

We showed a yearling at Saratoga this summer - at the Fasig-Tipton sale in August. Anybody can walk into that sale and see any horse, request to have it walked out for them, etc. There is no fee, and we are talking about a sale where a price of $150K is on the very low end.

Ravencrest_Camp
Feb. 7, 2008, 11:24 AM
Yeah, that's the part that I don't get. Why is there a seller's fee?

We showed a yearling at Saratoga this summer - at the Fasig-Tipton sale in August. Anybody can walk into that sale and see any horse, request to have it walked out for them, etc. There is no fee, and we are talking about a sale where a price of $150K is on the very low end.

I think you mean a buyer's fee.

Daymark
Feb. 7, 2008, 01:11 PM
I heard from a friend in Aiken that she heard.....

Ya know, I really hate these kinds of comments. This is where pure GOSSIP gets going and really starts to snowball. Why would you even put something like that in print? I mean, it is not even second hand information, not to mention first hand. Grow. Up. :no:

flyingchange
Feb. 7, 2008, 03:03 PM
oops, thanks for catching that! i'll change it.

Daymark
Feb. 10, 2008, 10:51 PM
I heard firsthand that there are over 30 registered BUYERS for the sale. That does not count those who did not register, pay their $125 or get the letter of credit. I'm sure there will be many who come to spectate who are interested in buying as well.

Gry2Yng
Feb. 12, 2008, 11:18 AM
I just wanted to post my support for the sale and all of the work that has gone into it. Every new concept has kinks and I am grateful to the organizers for making the effort. I hope to book my plane ticket today. As I don't have a preference for green or made, just a NICE horse, I love the idea of seeing all these horses of different types and experience at once. Of the 6-8 horses I have purchased in the last 10 years, the ones that I enjoyed the most were the ones I was attracted to instantly. This is a great forum for me to see if I can find the "instant attraction" horse. I also buy the occasional horse off the track to resell and it will be great to see what people are turning around for $20K in less than 6 months.

Pedigrees, performance and photos would be great for the catalog. Especially if a buyer/trainer is shopping for a specific rider. We all have friends who won't buy a chestnut with four white feet or will only buy a bay with lots of chrome. I don't like dishy faces, probably wouldn't buy a dishy face no matter how great the horse was, I believe in Jimmy W rule. Gotta love looking at him over the stall door.

Also, thankful for this thread or I never would have collected all the information I needed to know whether to attend, when to arrive, etc.

Anywho, thanks to Craig and Sara for putting this together. This will be my first trip away from my daughter and I am looking forward to it.

blaster
Feb. 18, 2008, 08:55 AM
Well just a few days away. It is interesting to review the entrants, 75 horses, a only a handful that had gone above training.

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 18, 2008, 09:20 AM
So who'll be shopping there next week?

AppJumpr08
Feb. 18, 2008, 10:44 AM
I won't be shopping.. but I'll be there Wednesday checking it out!

twitch
Feb. 21, 2008, 01:59 AM
I worked for Sarah there today from 7am to around noon. It was a great success! I was amazed at how smoothly it went[all things considered], and how much work and thought went into it. I hope the sale becomes a staple event in Aiken and that each year brings more horses and buyers.

I'll be there tomorrow for 8-9 hours, so stop in and say hi! The place is beautiful too :]

Badger
Feb. 21, 2008, 04:49 PM
My friend bought the horse of her dreams (her words)—he was the first to catch her eye on Tues, she test rode and started vetting him yesterday, finished the vetting first thing this morning and now she's shopping for blankets and arranging shipping home. She was amazed at how well run it was for a first time event, and there were several other horses that would have been candidates if Mr. Right hadn't been the one.

abrownhorse
Feb. 21, 2008, 08:48 PM
Would love to hear statistics:

# registered buyers
# sales finalized at the sale
# horses presented

Of the sold horses, how many went fo the Reserve Price? How many received multiple offers? What number sold "after" the sale...when lower than the reserve could be accepted.

This is a fantastic idea. Kudos to Craig et al for organizing. Can't wait to hear how it turned out! I have a friend who took her horse to the sale and I'm chomping at the bit to hear how it went!

saje
Feb. 21, 2008, 10:17 PM
I was there with a friend as a 2nd pair of hands, and had a very interesting couple of days. I confess we were a wee bit worried wqhen we first drove over to register, the property is very much still under construction, and the grounds are compact.

But the whole thing was very well thought out and planned and ran very very well. My friend's horse did not generate any interest (she didn't really expect it, but was hopeful, and perhaps word of mouth will get him sold) but there were several horses each day that had many people signing up for trial rides. I don't know what their experiences were, but it all looked sensibly managed and productive. We left about 12 today, and there were 2 horses sold and one with an offer. I don't know what the finally tally was.

I CAN say that everyone was extremely friendly and helpful, we had plenty of hot coffee in the morning and a delicious lunch each day, and the set up was great for watching the horses work on the flat, over stadium fences, and some XC questions too. I was almost wishing I was horse shopping!

Kudos to Craig and all his crew for all that hard work, and a great new venture!

edited to add that I believe there were 75 horses (about all that could be reasonably seen in the time available) and 35 or so registered buyers on the 1st day. I don't know if anyone came as a spectator and ended up paynig the buyer's fee. I'm pretty damn sure though that there were quite a few people who came as spectatos, saw horses they liked, and will be calling on the owners in the very near future - I overheard several such conversations.

I hope this sale will be repeated next year :)

pwynnnorman
Feb. 22, 2008, 07:26 AM
there were several horses each day that had many people signing up for trial rides.


Gotta admit, that threw me a bit. How did that work for those horses? (How does it ever--other sales do similar things, don't they...allowing trial rides, that is.) Does the seller strictly limit how long each party can try the horse? What about jumping? How did it work at this sale?

Great concept, IMO. I'd love to hear more of the details.

Kcisawesome
Feb. 22, 2008, 08:06 AM
Is there any way to find out which horses were bought?

saje
Feb. 22, 2008, 08:15 AM
As far as I could tell as a spectator, the seller has the ultimate say in how long each buyer could try a horse, and what they could do. Each buyer/horse pair had to satrt in the sand ring (there were a few stadium fences up too) and had to have the seller's OK to move over to the grass area, where there was more of a stadium course set up on the edge of the XC area. XC had all the basic elements - logs, roll tops, water, ditch, bank - in a 5? or so acre bowl-shaped field. Very well planned.

The try-outs seemed to be in groups of 6 or so, for a set amount of time, and buyers had to sign up early for who they wanted to try and were allotted times. I think each session was 1/2 an hour? Really popular horses mighyt have 2 try-ers in that time, most had one.

Now mind you, this ia all from just watching and reading the various lists, so I may not be 100% accurate here. My general impression was of organized chaos, but it seemed to work well :)

gandalf
Feb. 22, 2008, 11:37 AM
I had two horses entered in the sale. We were discouraged due to the stabling situation, and the lack of a parking area. The sale ran smoothly and on time, with nice facilities. I was also discouraged that there was no place to warm up the horses before you took them into the ring for the buyers to see them. There was no room for all of us to stand waiting to get to that ring. But the jumps were nice. They catered to an upper level horse and crowd. I wished they had a dressage ring, but there was none. Then after I showed both horses I kept checking back with the office to see if my a buyer had requested to ride either of my horses. After no body requested to ride, we packed up to leave and I was told there was no reason for me to come back the second day. This really bothered me because I paid for two days for two horses with lunch, etc. I was told by a well known upper level rider that they were not told the same thing. They were welcomed back the second day. As we were leaving, two people found us at the trailers and said they had signed up to ride our horses and couldn't find or contact us. At that point, they needed to leave to go home and didn't have time to get one the horses. This upset me greatly!! The office didn't contact us when the people signed up and we had checked the list twice - but they signed up late and then waited around for us. I felt like I had spent all that money for nothing, as well as traveling 6 hours and the sale not being a true two day event, etc.

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 22, 2008, 12:08 PM
That really stinks... to come all that way to be told to just go home. I wouldn't be happy either.

Dr. Doolittle
Feb. 22, 2008, 12:15 PM
Seriously, Yikes! :eek:

yellowbritches
Feb. 22, 2008, 03:10 PM
Oh my...

Haywood Jablowme
Feb. 22, 2008, 03:33 PM
I had two horses entered in the sale. We were discouraged due to the stabling situation, and the lack of a parking area. The sale ran smoothly and on time, with nice facilities. I was also discouraged that there was no place to warm up the horses before you took them into the ring for the buyers to see them. There was no room for all of us to stand waiting to get to that ring. But the jumps were nice. They catered to an upper level horse and crowd. I wished they had a dressage ring, but there was none. Then after I showed both horses I kept checking back with the office to see if my a buyer had requested to ride either of my horses. After no body requested to ride, we packed up to leave and I was told there was no reason for me to come back the second day. This really bothered me because I paid for two days for two horses with lunch, etc. I was told by a well known upper level rider that they were not told the same thing. They were welcomed back the second day. As we were leaving, two people found us at the trailers and said they had signed up to ride our horses and couldn't find or contact us. At that point, they needed to leave to go home and didn't have time to get one the horses. This upset me greatly!! The office didn't contact us when the people signed up and we had checked the list twice - but they signed up late and then waited around for us. I felt like I had spent all that money for nothing, as well as traveling 6 hours and the sale not being a true two day event, etc.

Are you saying they wouldn't allow you to come back the second day?

gandalf
Feb. 22, 2008, 03:55 PM
They would not have kept me from coming, but they had no openings for me to ride anywhere. I could have gone back, but not to ride my horses. I think they booked too many horses to let people show both days as they originally suggested on their website. There was no point in going back if I couldn't get on my horses. The farm is small and there was no room for me to even get on and ride around. I never saw any trails for a trail ride - they told people they could not be on the horses in any riding area unless it was their time to show. We had 15 min. in two different areas.

saje
Feb. 22, 2008, 04:55 PM
That's odd, we were told we could come and show in the morning before 9:45, and again at the lunch break.

gandalf
Feb. 22, 2008, 05:21 PM
I would have gone back if I were told that. From what I understood different people were told different things. I am not sure if that happened due to the disorganization or who was being told. I was told the second day's showings started at 9am and there would be no room for me to ride due to that. I am not one to argue and make a scene, I just left and won't recommend them in the future. The person who I talked to was Craig himself, so there was no reason for me to question the facts I was given.

gandalf
Feb. 22, 2008, 05:38 PM
I should add that I did ask Craig if I could ride after 12:00, that is when the horses were done been "shown". But he said no b/c they would then be tried out by buyers and I couldn't be riding during that time either.

saje
Feb. 22, 2008, 06:30 PM
Sorry that happened, I'd be disappointed too.

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 22, 2008, 07:19 PM
Has anyone heard how many horses sold over the weekend?

FlightCheck
Feb. 22, 2008, 07:35 PM
I heard that just 4 sold.

But that may not be correct.

InstigatorKate
Feb. 22, 2008, 08:50 PM
Wow.

I can't think of any reason not to post the seller's cell phone numbers next to the horse. 2 people who wanted to try the horses and couldn't find you. That sucks.

DogwoodValleyFarm
Feb. 23, 2008, 09:40 AM
Wow.

I can't think of any reason not to post the seller's cell phone numbers next to the horse. 2 people who wanted to try the horses and couldn't find you. That sucks.

Well, for me that would have been useless since I had no cell phone service at all at the farm. I have Cingular, don't know if the Verizon phones had service or not. The problem could have been that the announcer could only be heard right up by the arenas and not back in the parking area where the trailers and horses were.

Sarah told me that I was welcome to come back on the second day but there really wasn't a reason for it. I took the opportunity to come back and take many, many conformation shots of my horse since he was clean and braided. In my opinion, it is hard to get a REALLY GOOD conformation shot and you can take 100 pictures, with maybe 3 coming out to be "the one".

I think the real serious issue about the sale was the 2:1 ratio of sales horses to buyers. There was a very, very nice variety of horses, everything from a beginner rider's packer, an unstarted three year old to THE horse of your dreams. For whatever reason, there just were not enough people willing to pay the $125 buyers fee. There very well could have been some serious buyers there that paid the $25 spectator fee and there probably will be some horses sold to those folks. It's a fantastic concept, was a well run sale for the first time out, the only thing that I saw seriously lacking was the number of serious buyers for any level, not just the upper levels. I do truly hope that there is much success for the sellers in the weeks coming.

Daymark
Feb. 23, 2008, 07:48 PM
Would love to hear statistics:

# registered buyers
# sales finalized at the sale
# horses presented

Of the sold horses, how many went fo the Reserve Price? How many received multiple offers? What number sold "after" the sale...when lower than the reserve could be accepted.

Hopefully they will be updating the website. It couldn't help but give everyone a better feeling about the sale, ESPECIALLY since they require the 3.5% to be paid if the horse sells 45 days later.

I decided not to bring my filly and after reading what has been said, I can't help but wonder if this was something that the only ones to benefit were the professionals who had expensive horses to sell. I hope not, but the catalog was absolutely full of sale horses from professionals.

AppJumpr08
Feb. 24, 2008, 12:09 PM
From a spectator's standpoint, I thought it was fantastic, and I'm really hoping to get some of my OTTBs going well enough to take them next winter.

I fell IN LOVE with a little bay gelding in the first group.. but unfortunately another horse isn't in the cards for me at the moment. But he was ADORABLE.

I hope that next year there will be more buyers - if I was shopping, it would be just the place for me to go - driving around to see that many nice horses would cost way more then the buyer's fee in gas!!

Ravencrest_Camp
Feb. 24, 2008, 12:59 PM
For whatever reason, there just were not enough people willing to pay the $125 buyers fee. There very well could have been some serious buyers there that paid the $25 spectator fee and there probably will be some horses sold to those folks.

Another thing that would dissuade me from becoming "a buyer" at the sale, would be the letter of credit from the bank.
A letter of credit is a financal instrument and the process of obtaining one is similar to taking out a loan. It's not just a note from your bank manager saying you can afford a horse.

grabmaneandgo
Feb. 24, 2008, 03:45 PM
For whatever reason, there just were not enough people willing to pay the $125 buyers fee. There very well could have been some serious buyers there that paid the $25 spectator fee and there probably will be some horses sold to those folks.

You need to have successful sale in order to attract buyers. That's usually what one can expect out of the first go 'round. Put on the best sale you can and hope that enough spectators show up, find the event valuable, and come back next year as registered buyers. The ratio of buyers to sellers is sure to improve next year.

As evidenced within this thread, there are some people who think it's okay to go to sale like this (as a spectator, guest, or even a buyer), then contact the seller 46 days later to avoid paying out a commission to the Sale. I think that's pretty cheesy. If having to obtain a letter of credit weeds out people like that, maybe that's a good thing. Who wants to do business with those kinds of ethics? More importantly, who wants a horse to go to someone with those kinds of ethics?

Duramax
Feb. 24, 2008, 07:47 PM
Who wants to do business with those kinds of ethics? More importantly, who wants a horse to go to someone with those kinds of ethics?

:rolleyes:

Horseless1
Feb. 24, 2008, 07:54 PM
I suppose if someone likes a horse but doesn't need a horse (perhaps it's a second or third horse for them), they could wait 46 days, but if I find a horse I like, I act immediately because if the horse is nice it sells fast!

Plus is there any incentive for a buyer to wait 46 days since they don't pay the commission to the sale? I thought the seller paid the commission...

blaster
Feb. 24, 2008, 08:07 PM
. If having to obtain a letter of credit weeds out people like that, maybe that's a good thing. Who wants to do business with those kinds of ethics? More importantly, who wants a horse to go to someone with those kinds of ethics?

I don't think you understand how credit scores are calculated. If the bank does use their loan process, then they will run your credit score. The more inquiries, the lower your score becomes becuase the assumption is your a needing "excessive" credit. I ususally request a pre-approval which provides a general ballpark loan figure without the credit inquiery, then the actual loan once I decide on a purchase.

Learn more about it here: www.myfico.com

Dr. Doolittle
Feb. 24, 2008, 09:25 PM
Are there any other sales that require this??

It seems rather "intrusive", which (who knows?) may have discouraged some potential buyers...

cyriz's mom
Feb. 24, 2008, 10:11 PM
We've purchased horses at sporthorse auctions in the past. They required either cashier's checks or letters of credit (you then had to wire transfer funds before the horse could leave the grounds). Not exactly the same situation as this sale.

DogwoodValleyFarm
Feb. 24, 2008, 10:25 PM
Plus is there any incentive for a buyer to wait 46 days since they don't pay the commission to the sale? I thought the seller paid the commission...

Yes, it is the seller who pays the commission. I am much less flexible on the price of my horse now that I have paid $225 to bring him to the sale and will be on the hook for an additional $420 in a commission fee if the horse sells in 45 days. So if my horse sells within 45 days, there is a good chance that I will not be coming down too much in price due to the $645 that I will have paid out of pocket, not counting gas, hotel, braiding, incidentals. BUT will the typical buyer think this way? I doubt there will be any buyers waiting 46 days to come buy a horse.
As was stated earlier, many times if you wait too long the horse gets sold while you are waiting/making up your mind. I find this especially true if you are very specific and want a horse that is 17 hands and nothing shorter, et cetera. Just my two cents.

Romany
Feb. 25, 2008, 07:54 AM
Are there any other sales that require this??

It seems rather "intrusive", which (who knows?) may have discouraged some potential buyers...


I believe the RCMP (Canada's "Musical Ride") sporthorse auction, which is held every two years in Ottawa, Ontario, has requirements for proof of financial ability.

I got the impression they introduced such requirements after miles of desperate horsy women lined up to ride a purty horsy and schmooze with a good-lookin' Mountie at the earlier auctions!

http://www.rcmp-f.ca/events/auction.php

Daymark
Feb. 25, 2008, 09:13 AM
We've purchased horses at sporthorse auctions in the past. They required either cashier's checks or letters of credit (you then had to wire transfer funds before the horse could leave the grounds). Not exactly the same situation as this sale.

That is standard practice at many auctions and a very good way to do things. However, this was not an auction; it was a sale. Craig said himself on this very thread that he did not expect many sales to be finalized the day of the sale but in the days following the sale hence the 45 day rule. There is a big difference between sale and auction.

Either way, I am of the opinion that a 2:1 ratio of sellers to buyers is not going to be beneficial to sellers whether it is a sale or auction.

Snowhorse Farm
Feb. 25, 2008, 06:35 PM
I liked the article written up for USEventing.com. I hope to be able to go next year. I would love to hear more success stories from people finding their dream horse, or people finding a dream home for their sale horse.

cteventing
Feb. 25, 2008, 10:27 PM
I liked it, too, but the article failed to mention the most important component to the sale's success -- Sarah! Anyone who went into the office at any time had to have been impressed by her organization and kindness. All I had to do was drag the arena a couple times and put out a few jumps.
CRT

NeverTime
Feb. 26, 2008, 12:08 PM
Looks like they've "fixed" the blog to give Sarah her proper credit. Go Heffie! Glad the sale went well.

LKF
Feb. 26, 2008, 01:27 PM
Yes, I fixed the article and sent my apology to Sarah and Craig. It was a great oversight on my part. Sarah went 'above and beyond' the call of duty. - Zeb

NeverTime
Feb. 26, 2008, 01:54 PM
LKF: Not meant as a slam on you. Love your writing; the blog is lots of fun! Just extending props for Sarah.

aiken4horses
Feb. 26, 2008, 04:26 PM
I'm amazed at how many people are griping about a few hundred dollars making or breaking the sale of a horse.
On various horse hunting trips I've easily spent $$$ to go see ONE horse - flight, hotel, rental car, meals, etc. Never mind the ones that then don't pass a PPE - several more hundred dollars! Oh well, keep looking.

I've attended several different sale/auction events both on the east and west coasts. Bought and sold. Paid entry fees, commissions, taxes, stabling, travel costs for horse and human. I've been required to provide ID, a letter of credit and have coughed up entrance fees, parking fees, lunch, well, you get the idea.

If you're really lucky in your horse search you find one, on your own, at the next farm and walk (or ride!) him home - NO cost but the purchase price!
Hello - reality check!

Most people will use the services of their trainer, or other professional who will want to be compensated for their time and expertise. Commissions ranging from a flat fee to 10-12%, will normally be added on, at both ends.

For those that "go it alone" there's your time, perhaps only a day or two available on the weekends, phone bills, videos to sift thru, ads to "interpret", gas, travel expenses, not to mention the numb butt from hours on the computer looking at web sites!

For a first time event, I thought the sale offered a great selection and ran smoothly.
I heard Sarah and Craig asking people for opinions/suggestions. I'm sure they'd love feedback, constructive critisicsm if you attended and have something to contribute.

And $25 for entry? For a fabulous catered lunch, getting to see 2 days worth of nice horses, make some contacts and spend the day with friends? Priceless!:D

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Feb. 26, 2008, 04:34 PM
And $25 for entry? For a fabulous catered lunch, getting to see 2 days worth of nice horses, make some contacts and spend the day with friends? Priceless!:D

My main suggestion would be next year publicize this part more. I might very well have trotted down to ogle had I known about this option earlier. I considered it for $125 but wasn't that in need of entertainment and a road trip.

And if there were some way at the sale to upgrade from ogler to buyer, who knows what trouble I could get into. ;) My family has been known to go "just to look" and come home with some lovely critter before. :yes:

aiken4horses
Feb. 26, 2008, 04:42 PM
The option of upgrading from a "gawker" to "buyer" was definitely available for $100 on site. Not sure how the letter of credit was addressed if you were already there and wanted to buy

If you were a seller and saw a horse you liked you could also become a buyer.

Prior to the sale I was skeptical after reading the initial comments posted here (a friend of a friend, said that they heard someone who ...yikes!!!) but the web site answered my questions and any others I had I called and asked Sarah directly.

FrittSkritt
Feb. 26, 2008, 05:05 PM
Are they going to post the results?

Daymark
Feb. 26, 2008, 05:26 PM
My main suggestion would be next year publicize this part more. I might very well have trotted down to ogle had I known about this option earlier. I considered it for $125 but wasn't that in need of entertainment and a road trip.

I thought that that was very clear on the FAQ page that spectators were welcome for a $25 fee. That certainly was a fantastic deal according to the feedback about the farm, lunch, gorgeous horses.

saje
Feb. 26, 2008, 05:29 PM
There was a page deicated to spectators:

http://www.aikeneventhorsesale.com/spectators.html

aiken4horses
Feb. 26, 2008, 05:31 PM
Per Sarah, "as of today 4 sales are 100% and several others are being vetted."

Seller info is available (or possibly to be posted on the web site) for people who wanted to contact them directly after the sale - like me, who needs time to convince Mr Aiken that we really, really do need another horse!

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 26, 2008, 05:42 PM
I still can't believe they didn't bring tents in to stable horses... it would have helped the one seller that posted about her not so positive experience (the issue with buyers not being able to find them in the parking lot of trailers.)

When you're trying to project a certain image, things need to be done first-class all the way, not just part of the way. I'm thankful we didn't bring our irish mare, and it worked out since she sold weeks prior to the sale. The stabling situation was the deal breaker for me.

DogwoodValleyFarm
Feb. 26, 2008, 10:04 PM
I still can't believe they didn't bring tents in to stable horses... it would have helped the one seller that posted about her not so positive experience (the issue with buyers not being able to find them in the parking lot of trailers.)

When you're trying to project a certain image, things need to be done first-class all the way, not just part of the way. I'm thankful we didn't bring our irish mare, and it worked out since she sold weeks prior to the sale. The stabling situation was the deal breaker for me.

When an event (or show) is over there are always lots of things that you think to yourself "I wish they would have done X,Y,Z differently" Who knows, things may be entirely different for this sale next year.

I decided to take the stabling situation and make it work for me and my horse. He is not even three, has never been more than about 30 minutes from home and this was going to be a 5 hour trip, so I was careful to find a place with private turnout so that he would not be standing cooped up in a stall or trailer for essentially two days. I used this as an opportunity to reinforce good trailer loading habits that he already has and as a lesson in standing quietly and patiently while on the trailer or next to the trailer eating hay. Everything went well and my horse was able to have a very positive experience in a situation that was completely new to him.

I am sure that Craig and Sarah have gotten lots of feedback and will make changes for the sale next year if we are indeed lucky enough for them to host it again. I made a point to thank them for their hard work personally because I appreciated their efforts. So far, the feedback has been much more positive than otherwise and I hope that they are encouraged to host the sale again.

Snapdragon
Feb. 26, 2008, 10:10 PM
This is off topic, but Dogwood, Capriccio is one handsome horse!

Platinum Equestrian
Feb. 26, 2008, 10:35 PM
When an event (or show) is over there are always lots of things that you think to yourself "I wish they would have done X,Y,Z differently" Who knows, things may be entirely different for this sale next year.

I decided to take the stabling situation and make it work for me and my horse. He is not even three, has never been more than about 30 minutes from home and this was going to be a 5 hour trip, so I was careful to find a place with private turnout so that he would not be standing cooped up in a stall or trailer for essentially two days. I used this as an opportunity to reinforce good trailer loading habits that he already has and as a lesson in standing quietly and patiently while on the trailer or next to the trailer eating hay. Everything went well and my horse was able to have a very positive experience in a situation that was completely new to him.

I am sure that Craig and Sarah have gotten lots of feedback and will make changes for the sale next year if we are indeed lucky enough for them to host it again. I made a point to thank them for their hard work personally because I appreciated their efforts. So far, the feedback has been much more positive than otherwise and I hope that they are encouraged to host the sale again.

Yes, however the suggestion was made regarding stabling prior to the auction... not after. We would have been coming from Florida... and the stabling they recommended was full.

Did your horse sell?

InstigatorKate
Feb. 26, 2008, 11:35 PM
Catalogue appears to be updated with the 4 horses that sold. All 4 were priced at $20k. Ages: 2-5yos, 1-10yo, and 1-14yo, all geldings, with experience at least to Novice, one with a prelim record. 3 full TBs, one ISH.

Badger
Feb. 26, 2008, 11:51 PM
Very nteresting that the sold horses are all the same price.

I see that the sellers' contact info has also been added for the unsold horses, so the catalog is still providing marketing for the participants.

aiken4horses
Feb. 27, 2008, 09:59 AM
Dogwood - your young horse was gorgeous! His trot, when you lunged him on the grass, was fabulous! I was working at the Event but he certainly caught my eye. I've mentioned him to a few trainers/friends.

You were also one of the very few people who actually kept their horse up by the rings, in view, so people could see them. I had someone ask me if they should put their horse back on the trailer after the demo? I suggested that if they wanted the horse seen, hiding him in the trailer wasn't the best idea - "keep him visable, walk him around the barn area, up and down the "jog" path (that wasn't being used), stand him by the grass ring."

When you have a horse for sale, you need to "market" him! Get him "seen". If someone showed up after your demo how would they know what he looked like? How he was built? Yes, pictures in the catalogue would be nice but you still need to see the horse in person, watch him move, how he's reacting to all the activity.

As a reformed H/J person I've learned Eventers are very independent, which is great. You do everything yourself, tack and stand your horses for hours in the trailers. You were all ON TIME for your demo rides - that blew me away! The Event sale format would NEVER have worked with the H/J crowd - the rings would have been empty as riders waited for the braider, groomer, trainer to get the horse ready and finish their Latte'.
However, this was the one time when parking your horse on the trailer wasn't to your advantage.
Perhaps this is something that can be addressed for next year. Maybe designated parking so buyers would know where the seller's trailer was. Or having the jog during the lunch break.

I certainly didn't mind the fact that there was nowhere for riders to warm-up the horses. When I go to look at a horse I want to see it come out "cold", not all warm-up, lunged and schooled.

The idea was that the sale would bring buyers and seller "together". Not necessarily close sales in the 2 day period. There are still horses being thought about, tried and vetted.

DogwoodValleyFarm
Feb. 27, 2008, 11:20 AM
Dogwood - your young horse was gorgeous! His trot, when you lunged him on the grass, was fabulous! I was working at the Event but he certainly caught my eye. I've mentioned him to a few trainers/friends.
You were also one of the very few people who actually kept their horse up by the rings, in view, so people could see them. I had someone ask me if they should put their horse back on the trailer after the demo? I suggested that if they wanted the horse seen, hiding him in the trailer wasn't the best idea - "keep him visable, walk him around the barn area, up and down the "jog" path (that wasn't being used), stand him by the grass ring."

I just wanted to use the opportunity to let him soak everything in. There was plenty for him to look at, with the horses jumping, people walking around. It was a great opportunity for him to freak out and act like an idiot, but thankfully he remembered his manners and was such a good boy. Yep, standing and holding a young horse isn't the easiest and most entertaining job in the world, but I must confess that a big part of my wanting to stand up and watch the other horses go was simply because there were some incredible horses there, some excellent riders. Anytime I can sit and watch "horsey eye candy" for any length of time, I'll do it!


The idea was that the sale would bring buyers and seller "together". Not necessarily close sales in the 2 day period. There are still horses being thought about, tried and vetted.

I knew that going in to the sale. Makes sense really since at least for me spending between $10k and $40k on a horse would not likely be done in one day. Call me crazy, but I'd need at least a day or ten to make a final decision. That's a lot of money!

Daymark
Mar. 11, 2008, 02:00 PM
I checked the online sales catalog and there are two more horses that were sold! They are not just the upper end horses, one is a 3 y/o, I think, so even the young greenies are generating some interest. Pretty encouraging, I think.:)

bornfreenowexpensive
Mar. 11, 2008, 02:21 PM
I checked the online sales catalog and there are two more horses that were sold! They are not just the upper end horses, one is a 3 y/o, I think, so even the young greenies are generating some interest. Pretty encouraging, I think.:)


I spoke with someone who brought some higher end horses to the sale and I thought they made a good point. Their horses didn't sell at the sale but they said that they thought it was good sale and now people know they have some nice horses for sale. In some ways, I would think that alone might make it worth the time and cost......marketing people.

I hope that they hold it again next year and hope that this will become a sucessful venture.

Badger
Mar. 11, 2008, 03:40 PM
My friend's Aiken purchase arrived at the barn this week and has settled in and I keep getting excited updates as she gets to know him. To say she is really, really, really glad she took time off, flew herself and trainer down, and went to the sale, is an understate.

After shopping locally and calling all over the country for months, and looking at videos and online ads and trying several horses, and not finding Mr. Right, Aiken really was the best venue for a shopper not conveniently located near an eventer-dense area.

rideforthelaurels16
Mar. 11, 2008, 08:44 PM
some VERY nice horses in the catalogue! for sure in a couple of years when i've worked my way up to a nice upper level horse that'll be one of the first places i'll go!

DogwoodValleyFarm
Mar. 12, 2008, 09:06 AM
To say she is really, really, really glad she took time off, flew herself and trainer down, and went to the sale, is an understate.

After shopping locally and calling all over the country for months, and looking at videos and online ads and trying several horses, and not finding Mr. Right, Aiken really was the best venue for a shopper not conveniently located near an eventer-dense area.

I have heard that as well from a couple of people who have been looking for a long time. There are so very many horses out there for sale, some represented honestly and some not, that it is hard to make a "short list" to go see, and many times one will be in Oregon and the other in South Carolina.

I am looking forward to seeing how many sell right before the 45 days and how many after. For me, I'm not that concerned about the 45 days; if he sells before then, great, I have no problem paying the 3.5%, just the cost of doing business.

DogwoodValleyFarm
Apr. 24, 2008, 11:01 AM
The 45 days have passed requiring sellers to pay the 3.5% to the Aiken Sale. I have counted seven horses on their website that have sold, but it hasn't been updated since March 21.

Anyone have any comments?

My horse hasn't sold yet, but I had gotten lots of interest from the sale. Just working on getting a decent free jump video.

jreventer
Apr. 24, 2008, 05:54 PM
My horse has not sold-have had interest but none that I know of that was generated from the sale...just for reference he is a prelim level tb gelding

53
Apr. 24, 2008, 09:07 PM
jreventer - watched your video - that is a very nice jumping horse

Daymark
Apr. 26, 2008, 12:17 AM
I just checked the website and they haven't updated the sale catalog since 3-21. I think the 45 days ran april 6th. Anyone know if they are planning on a sales catalog update? It might be a good idea, PR wise.