PDA

View Full Version : So, What *IS* the highest level you've shown?



Pony Fixer
Oct. 9, 2007, 09:39 PM
I am pretty sick of all the $h*t slinging going around lately. What, we've had no less than 6 threads since the CvB incident, and apparently everyone is an expert. Not that there hasn't been some honest-to-gawd interesting discourse, but you have to wade through a lot of BS to find it.

So, 'fess up. What is your experience? USDF recognized/licensed please, not schooling show. And don't answer with what level you're "schooling at home", 'cause we all know that's not the same...

appychik
Oct. 9, 2007, 09:48 PM
We're going to attempt 1st this next spring :D Pretty good feat for a WP bred & trained Appaloosa. Very much of a stock-ish horse... keeps up well with the "Jones" though.

Yep. Not a big Dressage rider, but I love it. Learning lots. (Kinda funny that we've been stuck at Training for almost 8 years... lol. Just doesn't have the ideal movement for dressage to move up any faster...)

Tasker
Oct. 9, 2007, 09:50 PM
USDF Silver & Gold medals, Grand Prix for the last few years...but I know I am a lucky person to have had the right horses at the right time! :) I love the Special but it has been a while since I've gotten to show that test. *sigh* Maybe next year...

Honestly, it is hard to find time to do all that needs doing horse & barn work wise and participate in all the 'discussions' that go on around here...

bird4416
Oct. 9, 2007, 09:50 PM
Ready to move up to third.

Dressage-ryder
Oct. 9, 2007, 09:54 PM
I have competed at 3* shows through 4th test 3 :) ..... Right now I really like working with the youngsters ( having a breeding farm will do that) but I did breed my filly with the hopes of her being my next upper level horse.. She is only 1.5 years right now but I have high hopes for her. She is Fabuleux X Winterprinz and got the dressage genes from both sides :)

Ride On
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:03 PM
I got my Bronze this year on my Friesian.

YoungFilly
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:03 PM
:winkgrin: I picked 3rd, but come November, it will be 4th.

YoungFilly
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:08 PM
I got my Bronze this year on my Friesian.


This is such an accomplishment. It is one thing to buy a horse who already knows this, and then its another thing when you train them there yourself, expecially when they are a big and beautiful Friesian! Great job Ride On for your bronze!! :winkgrin:

Dressage Art
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:09 PM
Junior FEI on the GP schoolmaster and 3rd on the horse that I brought up along myself.

~Freedom~
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:11 PM
FEI--GP

Trained by me from scratch.

TeddyRocks
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:41 PM
You asked... LOL

So, 'fess up. What is your experience? USDF recognized/licensed please, not schooling show. And don't answer with what level you're "schooling at home", 'cause we all know that's not the same...

Once upon a time, I really really had riding aspirations, goals etc... Thought maybe ONE DAY I would ride at the top levels... Ridden and showed since I was 12 years old... Hunters... Then went to riding school at Morven Park, determined and naive enough to think I would ride and show professionally for a living and maybe heck... Go to the Olympics... I was 18 then. I am 37 now... Showed third level ONE TIME, but really all of my "big" ;) successes came at lower level horse trials, and showing pretty consistently at 1st and 2nd level. Had a fancy dressage horse, showed at Wally world every month etc... Went to regionals a couple of times, and did well, then BAM... Reality set in. Couldn't keep fancy horse sound (TB with bad feet), mom and dad stopped the "funds coming in", and WOW. Sad. No really. Sad...:yes: lol

NOW, I am a middle aged lower level, big fish in a very small pond rider. I give lessons to very SMALL time, though loyal and FUN AA riders, help them with their horses, etc... Though because of my background, I will put great basics on my riders, etc, and very gladly have seen a few of my riders pass me in abilities and successes. Hard to admit? NO. I love seeing it happen. What I don't like is seeing trainers/instructors, hanging onto their students, well past when they should, holding back their riders etc... And you (lol) all know who they or you are. But I think that is ANOTHER thread waiting to happen.

At this point in my life, I have a new life. I have a great new career (nurse), I have a great and my first husband, and now wow... I finally have a NICE horse again to ride. . And though I haven't been in the show ring in about 2+(OH MY GOD) years that too will change. I have access to one of the most up and coming international stars the west coast of Florida has seen, so I will be showing again, and I will continue to aspire for my riding "personal bests..."


But with God all things are possible.
(Matthew 19:26)

THIS IS ADDED: Just wondering, how long would scores count, if one wanted to get her bronze medal? I need only one more score, but like I said, it has been years since I've been in the show ring, and I don't know how long info is kept available from the USDF, or I may have the original tests???

twnkltoz
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:51 PM
Training! I hope I don't come off like a know-it-all. Can I brag that we're schooling first and will show at the end of the month and I do my own training?

snoopy
Oct. 9, 2007, 11:33 PM
FEI....PSG.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:13 AM
Training. And that was before I learned how to ride.
But showing isn't really my goal anyway, my goal is to ride really, really well. And to have a relationship in and out of the saddle with my horse(s) that's delightfully enjoyable for all involved. And that's why I get my a$$ on an FEI schoolmaster every week, doing 3rd level stuff, and on a good day, I get the canter pirouette, too. :winkgrin:

luvs2ride79
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:52 AM
I had the pleasure to ride a Prix St George schoolmaster in a couple lessons, but the highest I have shown was 2nd level test 3. My current Anglo Arabian has the talent to go higher, so we'll see if that changes in the next few years ;).

CatOnLap
Oct. 10, 2007, 01:38 AM
:winkgrin:
I notice there are some prominent abstainers from this poll!

dwblover
Oct. 10, 2007, 02:02 AM
Grand Prix .....(in my dreams). Training Level test 4 in reality. Probably will be showing First Level test one next spring. That way we will be ready by the summer for Hong Kong. :lol:

Bats79
Oct. 10, 2007, 06:28 AM
International Grand Prix with a horse I BRED and trained / competed being I1 USDF Horse of the Year and making the long list for Barcelona the year after I sold him. :) Couple of Grand Prix (not international) horses since then.

dotneko
Oct. 10, 2007, 06:45 AM
FEI -GP, bronze, silver and gold on horses I trained myself.
The first (bronze and silver) was w-t-c when I bought him
as a coming 5 yo and showed him through I-1 with national
awards. The second I bought as a 10 yo in Holland - he was
z-3 ?? champion of north Holland and could do single changes.
I put p&p and the ones on him. Since my cancer and other
health issues, showing has been put on hold.
I'm also working on my 'R' license. (I was told by a well recognized
clinician that my horse was one of the best pirouetting horses
in the country :) though the best I've ever gotten on him is a 9
for them - the only 10 was for the change between the pirouettes
on the center line)
I guess I am not an FEI trainer since I didn't back either one


Dot

Hazelnut
Oct. 10, 2007, 07:01 AM
Only done schooling shows to date. And not that many - At training and first level.

I have been working with a very good trainer who is helping me keep my horse going correctly while helping me improve my seat and support the horse with effective (more subtle) aids.

Truely, I never know what I don't know till the light bulb comes on and I gain the feel of a certain thing that has been problematic.

Believe me, I will sing to the high heavens when I enter a recognized show. And I will...when I have something to show besides how damn handsome my horse is! ;)

merrygoround
Oct. 10, 2007, 07:29 AM
But that was way back when, and it was despite riding the "left overs". The kids got the better horses. :cry: But think of all the hands on experience I got dealing with all those "left overs". :) :) :)

Halt At X
Oct. 10, 2007, 07:35 AM
I only ever did training level on backyard horses borrowed from friends. I have not shown in about 8 years and since then my riding has progressed dramatically thanks to a great trainer and wonderful horses.
I have been away from riding for a few years due to raising a family and hope to return to the show ring this summer with a 5 yo Canadian Cheval who I will be training myself. We'll see what happens as I have no idea what level we will make our debut ;)

Rusty Stirrup
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:00 AM
Training. I don't like showing.

JRG
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:02 AM
After almost 30 years of riding, only 2 of which have been soley doing dressage I have yet to show in dressage.

I will say one of my goals this year on my new horse was that I would show, when I can sit his lengthenings. I can now sit, entries sent, for the end of the month. I will be doing First/four...wish me finesse and awareness!

Update** I still need finesse and awareness, but we did it and have one more opportunity this year at first level. I am thrilled with my boy, however I have impovements I need to make
Update:
2009 Bronze Medal,
2012 Prix St. Georges
On this horse, it has been a heck of a ride.

workinprogress
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:07 AM
My hat's off to you and all of the lower level trainers like you (and my first dressage trainer) that take people like me who don't have a clue and give them good basics and love to see them move onward and upward. Without trainers like you the AA over 40 rider like me would never make it to compete at second level with asperations to keep going on. I have seen too many lower level trainers that want to keep their students or worse - get totalled PO that they move on and continue to improve. I hope your students appreciate what you have done for them as much as I appreciate my first trainer.

hitchinmygetalong
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:15 AM
Sigh. It appears that I am destined for the sobriquet of "support staff."

But I'm still having fun!

Equa
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:16 AM
I've shown three horses at PSG. Now I have one at Novice (1st) and one at Medium (3rd).

Riding at a higher level CAN give insights into test riding. And make you more confident riding tests at lower levels (even though it doesn't mean you autimatically win as much).

At the very least it makes you a little humble watching other riders - especially fabulous ones. And a lot less likely to sit on the fence and bitch about how bad everyone else is....

SillyHorse
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:22 AM
Third.

grayarabpony
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:27 AM
2nd. Currently enough to give a critique on what's basically correct.

LD1129
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:54 AM
Training Level going recognized in the 2008 show season. Trained my appendix from scratch (with trainer) with me riding him. I was previously hunter/jumper and my horse used to drive a buggy in amish land and was walked through New Holland auction in the work horse section. This winter we will start to train/school our first level movements.

Apparently my boy is showing some hidden talent for dressage, he was a real diamond in the rough. Every one cracks up that maybe one day we will be announced at a PSG or I1 "LD riding her grade appendix" :winkgrin:

Sorry for the brag, he's been doing amazing lately!!!

honeylips
Oct. 10, 2007, 09:16 AM
PSG - actively this year.

Dutch Girl
Oct. 10, 2007, 09:21 AM
Currently I am showing 2nd level. Tomorrow I leave for regionals and I will ride in the championship class and then I will ride my first 3rd level test with my mare. Previously I have shown through 4th level but that was about 13 years ago.

hoopoe
Oct. 10, 2007, 09:56 AM
I just completed second level with my third horse and , soundness willing, will do third next year.

I schooled my first horse thru I-1 but that was in the day Bute was not allowed so he did not show.

Oh for a happy horse with good hocks :(



THIS IS ADDED: Just wondering, how long would scores count, if one wanted to get her bronze medal? I need only one more score, but like I said, it has been years since I've been in the show ring, and I don't know how long info is kept available from the USDF, or I may have the original tests???

scores for the medals are good indefinitely but you do need copies of the test covers or verifiable score check or verification from USEF ? USDF or the secretary. I have only found scores back thru 2005 on line at USDF. They may have further back but you might have to contact them to get a print out.

If the show secretary will sign the sheet you can have them validate their score. That is a bit tricky if they don't have the archived results. Show management is required to keep all show related papers archived for a certain length of time . I cannot remember if it is 5 years or more??? If you do take this track with a show secretary arrange to do so in person and take him / her a bottle of wine

akor
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:11 AM
I will NOT however, reveal my scores ;) The credit for any of my upper level riding goes to the horses, I was fortunate to come across some wonderful animals who knew WAY more than me (but they all do, actually) and also read my mind and forgave my many faults. I suspect they still tell stories about me in horse heaven (yeah, that redheaded one, she sure was fun to gallop with, but if she gave me the wrong aid one more time I don't know what I would have done. Never been so happy to halt at X and leave arena in my life!;))

Now, I don't seem me getting much above 1st, I get distracted by jumping...

FancyFree
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:18 AM
First level.

jodyb
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:20 AM
Shown 3rd, have my USDF bronze, havn't shown in a couple of years though I've have been actively clinicing in an attempt to move my horse along. He's got alot of the pieces for 4th/psg but getting it all together is a whole 'nother story. I've got a nice Trakehner mare I want to show next year at training and am trying to decide if I'm keeping my Royal Prince filly or my Contucci filly for my next young horse.

gr8fulrider
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:40 AM
If we consider "Eventing Dressage" to be dressage, then training level as an adult, and first level as a kid.


I was fortunate enough at one time to own an FEI schoolmaster who taught me a great deal that I apply now, but I didn't show him and I CERTAINLY didn't teach him anything except how to tolerate an amateur rider (bless his heart). :)

Kimberlee
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:36 AM
Well... having only done one recognized dressage show at intro level so far (and that was 3 years ago). That is what I put. Not sure what level you would compare the Prelim dressage tests to, but I am thinking at the most 1st.

Now, can I brag that I did 3 flying changes on one long diagonal in my lesson Monday night? I can't wait for next year to start, as we decided that I would just keep working thru the winter, and start showing at the "real" dressage shows next spring:) I can't wait:):):)

PS - I will be riding with Hans Biss next week, and can't wait for that either! (everyone here at work just can't wait for it to be over so I stop talking about it)

mp
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:58 AM
Excellent poll, Pony Fixer. Some posters on this board have very impressive resumes. Me, not so much. :)

I've shown training level so far on my 7 y.o. Arabian. I bred him and we've been at this dressage thing for about a year and a half. I take regular lessons, but I'm the only one who rides him. Because of my age (over 50) and time restrictions (we do a lot of other things besides dressage), my very modest goal is to score in the 60s at 1st level ... before *I'm* in my 60s. ;)

I enjoy showing because it gives me specific things to work on. But more than anything else, I just want to learn how to ride better and enjoy my horse. He's a gas.

DownYonder
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:22 PM
International Grand Prix with a horse I BRED and trained / competed being I1 USDF Horse of the Year and making the long list for Barcelona the year after I sold him. :) Couple of Grand Prix (not international) horses since then.

Wow, this is hugely impressive to me. What a sense of accomplishment you must have had. To take a horse you BRED and put on the ground, all the way through the levels to being long-listed for the Olympics - big kudos to you! :yes:

As for me, I used to ride several FEI schoolmasters, but I'm not into showing so only rode at the barn and in occasional clinics. I am currently trying to learn to ride again after being out of it for most of the past 7 years. Believe me, it isn't like bicycle riding - you DO forget how to do things (well, your body forgets, anyway!) :lol:

NOMIOMI1
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:35 PM
Trying for 1st next year but just started trying dressage aproximately 7 months ago. Last year in Arabian sport horse we qualified two horses for nationals and I got 4th in the sport horse championships and 6th in the regular class at The Scottsdale. The year before that in Hunter under saddle we qualified one horse for world and was undefeated on the mini circuit (sp?)

Daydream Believer
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:36 PM
I spent the vast majority of my life eventing and rarely rode higher than 1st level for that but did train a youngster I bred myself to 3rd level and showed second at recognized shows some years ago and then I went back to eventing. My current horse is hopefully going to take me much higher with FEI being my goal.

mjhco
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:42 PM
PSG

meupatdoes
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:44 PM
I am a hunter rider and have never done a rated dressage show, so my competitive upper level dressage experience consists of accidentally doing passage when I was supposed to be legyielding at COTH poster Tasker's place (how I wish I did not live so far from them), at which point I of course abandoned any plans of doing any sort of legyielding and passaged around the arena with all my might before they were able to get me under control again (It was GREAT).
And a very generous lesson horse in Florida once agreed to perform a one handed canter pirouette for me (WHEE!), but I had a dickens of a time getting the half pass to go on a straight line. Instructor wondered suspiciously about my BAC for the day.
(It appears that I am better at collection than directional control, le sigh.)

Ramblings aside, it has not escaped my note that the list of names responding here (holy flying BATMAN, bats79!) is a very different list from those shooting off their mouths being nasty to others in the other posts.

TBROCKS
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:51 PM
My first year showing and successfully showed USDF recognized Training this year and going First for 2008 on my wonderful TB. We even qualified for a year end award with my GMO!

cyndi
Oct. 10, 2007, 01:49 PM
I've trained and shown several horses from "scratch" up to First level successfully before _something_ (life/finances/loss of horse) intervened.

I _finally_ just finished my first year (and only year!) of recognized Second Level competition on a horse that I bred. I have owned her mom for 17 years, and this filly was born into my lap and I did all her training myself once my trainer (DukesMom!) started her with about 30 rides, and excellent coaching (also from DukesMom!). She is now 7. We ended the year with a 62.7 USDF median at Second and (I think) an All Breed Award with ISR/Oldenburg with the minimum 8 scores and now we're starting to learn flying changes - totally new territory for me! I won't show her at recognized shows again until I think we can get those last two dang scores at Third Level that I need for the Bronze!

SarMoniet
Oct. 10, 2007, 02:39 PM
I've never shown at a recognized show -- can't afford the organization fees (USDF, USAE, etc.) or the $$ required to travel that far (stall, hotel, etc.). The closest recognized venue is over 3 hours away from here, I believe.

We have a nice little local circuit here that pretty much tops out at First Level. I've shown three horses at 1st (one just for giggles and the judge didn't see the humor in it) -- if I ever decide I want to show higher than that I'll have to suck it up and go recognized. I pretty much lost all desire to show about two years ago, though, and don't really see that changing any time soon. Right now I'm benefiting a lot more by taking lessons & going to clinics.

AllWeatherGal
Oct. 10, 2007, 02:49 PM
Sigh. It appears that I am destined for the sobriquet of "support staff."

But I'm still having fun!

Last time I showed at a USEF recognized show was 4 years ago. At training (the lofty Tr4!).

As a scribe though, I've got extensive FEI experience, including international competition.:D

And I know a LOT more *about* dressage than I can perform myself.

Really ... there are so many ways to learn and so many things to learn ABOUT.

Listening and watching gives a different perspective and contributes to a different set of skills than are possible when one is IN the saddle and focusing on kinesthetic experiences on top of the active ear-listening.

I still admire that people get out there, put their money down, their egos aside and just DO it.

sabriel
Oct. 10, 2007, 03:23 PM
First 4 was the highest I ever was able to show, consitently getting mid 60´s. That was 3 years ago when I was a college student and I had leftover money. Also, most of the showing was done through the school and they did not offer 2nd 1 while I was there. I had "pointed out" and so if 2nd 1 had been offered I would have had to ride it. Not saying I would have done it very well though.

Since then, I have put showing aside and focused soley on training. I´ve reconfirmed my basic basics. I am hopeing now I will be able to get a horse of my own that I will be able to work with consistently from here on out. I am planning on backing my own. Which I do have successful experience in doing. But, I´d like something a little nicer, so it may have to grow out a bit in the pasture for a few years since I can´t afford a "nice and ready to start" three or four year old. Unless I scour the less commonly thought of breeds, which I intend to do!

Half Halt
Oct. 10, 2007, 05:35 PM
I've shown 4th. level, and waiting to feel ready for Prix St. Goerge. If I wait much longer I will die of old age, or my horse will.

Cowgirl
Oct. 10, 2007, 06:00 PM
I've shown through PSG, ridden all the gp, on a horse that I bought already trained. This year, I showed my young horse Training and First, got her horse performance certificates, and finished quite well. I am training her myself. She is ready for second level, and I hope to show her second and maybe third next year.

Pony Fixer
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:53 PM
How exciting!! I am learning so much from the stories.

I won't mention the notable absences (oops, I just did). I think it makes its own point.

So my story, which some have pieced together through past postings, I'm sure.

I have a 7 yo ClydeX that I've owned since a yearling. While we've been in training with various people throughout that time, I have done the majority of the work myself. After taking a year off to have a baby (me, not him :eek:), we came out at 2nd to a ppfffthhht of a season. First couple of shows he COMPLETELY lost his mind (uncharacteristic--but he's more fit than he used to be when we showed Tr/1st), and then I just couldn't get it together on him. We wallowed in the high 50s all spring (with one 60 or 61), took the summer off, and have now gone back and done a few schooling shows with low 60s, so we're scratching and clawing our way up. Next year will be more solid at that level, I'm sure.

I recently purchased a 12 yo DutchX that is trained to 4th, so the story goes. I have lots of trouble with him in the snaffle (improving), he's soft and calm in the double. Tried to get that last 2nd level score (did NOT succeed--uh, lowest score ever on a horse), punted the snaffle for this season, showed him at third in the double and was high score amatuer at 3rd level.

So I'm only missing one 2nd level score for my bronze (I know lots of people waiting for that last 3rd level score, I had to be different), which I feel confident I will get early next season.

I have my 1st level scores for my bronze bar on the draftX, I hope to get my scores needed to develop 2nd and 3rd level MFS for next season as well.

DukesMom
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:56 PM
I2 on self trained horse. Was green broke when I got him as a 4 year old...basically if you could get on him you might be able to ride him. :lol: We even made the top 10 in the USDF I2 HOY standings this year! And best of all he is my first dressage horse.

LarkspurCO
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:13 PM
There wasn't an option in your poll for "does not show."

While my primary objective has always been to become a better trainer and rider, at one point showing was a goal, and I went with my horse to a trainer with that possibility in mind. A year later she managed to destroy my confidence to the point where I didn't think I should even be riding him at all. She said the horse was lame, he was dangerous, he was, literally, "worth dog food" and should be put out to pasture, and that I was wasting my time. (She never actually sat on the horse.)

After leaving, it didn't take long to realize that the training methods I was instructed to use were actually making him lame. We took a year off to rehabilitate mind, body (stifles) and soul.

This spring I finally ventured out and found a new trainer. I went for lessons with two immediate goals, (1) to become a better rider and (2) to strengthen and improve my horse. My long-term objective was to become better trainer for my two younger horses. My trainer said early on that we could do fine in the AA division if I wanted to pursue that, though I still had no confidence so did not believe it (...lame...dog food...dangerous...)

Five months later, I'm finally starting to believe in my horse again. He is extremely smart and loves to be challenged. He's becoming stronger, sounder and more supple with correct training. In our lesson yesterday, we were doing canter-walk-counter-canter-walk transitions on the circle. A few months ago we couldn't do a canter-walk transition anywhere. We were all so pleased, me, the trainer and the horse. She asked, "What are we going to do when we get him all trained up?"

I don't know ... maybe next year?

My trainer also happens to be judge, so she will occasionally give me scores on our movements in the lessons. Kinda makes it interesting.

WindsongEq
Oct. 10, 2007, 10:39 PM
Grand Prix, GP Special, GP freestyle on a horse I trained myself. USDF Gold, Silver, Bronze, Gold Freestyle Bar.

exvet
Oct. 11, 2007, 02:35 AM
I have my bronze and so far have trained 3 of my horses through third. The one I'm showing now (at 3rd) will be debuting at 4th later this year. I've owned him since he was 2. I have a 3 year old stallion who I have my hopes in taking me all the way but with any luck I'm hoping to earn my silver with my current "guy" pictured in my profile. Only time will tell - at least I'm pretty sure we should be able to earn my 4th level scores together barring any unforseen setbacks.

Lgd1
Oct. 11, 2007, 06:17 AM
Inter I with my older mare, bought her as an unbacked 4yo and have done all the training myself (with help from a lot of good teachers! :D )

My other ridden mare was due to start PSG this summer but has had time off for a field injury. She's back competing but have dropped her back to Medium/Advanced Medium (L3 + changes) for the winter as there are no Advanced (L4) classes in my part of the world over the winter and she is not fully fit yet. Hopefully start PSG in the spring if winter training goes well.

Dorienna
Oct. 11, 2007, 02:04 PM
Int.1 on my self-trained mare. ok, so it took me a few more years to get there than the pros, but we made it and i've learned tons :-)

Camstock
Oct. 11, 2007, 05:50 PM
I have done precisely one USDF recognized dressage show at Training level (T4) on a friend's really nice-moving imported warmblood that a GP trainer did much of the training on. Won the 70 horse class by several points. I was clearly the monkey in the tack. I may never go back to USDF shows just to keep the 1-0 record intact. So kidding.

I'm an event/foxhunting addict, but read Balkenhol, Zettl or Wanless daily and lesson with the best dressage folks I can get my ears on, as dressage is the basis for all good horsemanship. If there was a daily Zettl pull off calendar I would own it. The more dressage I ride, the easier the other disciplines get.

dalpal
Oct. 11, 2007, 06:09 PM
I had shown first level with my old schoolmaster. He went lame and I had to retire him.

Had to take a couple years off because my young horse went to the trainer' and I had nothing to ride.

Just got back into it a little over a year ago.

I'm fortuante to own a 2nd level boy and we are starting to pull things together....my dream would be able to afford to at least to one show next spring at 1st level and go from there.

ADW
Oct. 11, 2007, 06:23 PM
Prix St.Georges

NRB
Oct. 11, 2007, 09:02 PM
Did my first rec dressage show in Sept and happy with the 65% I got at First level 2,3 on an Incentive Fund Registered QH I brought along myself.

I have LOADS to learn and for the most part refrain from making comments on this board. Actually as an eventer I stay far away from this board but sometimes enjoy watching the catfights from afar............there has been some really good humor on this board...the dead baby thread comes to mind.....there have been others....the tack trunk that threw someone and etc.....

CatOnLap
Oct. 12, 2007, 09:14 PM
Its interesting to see. So, 60% at second level or below. 20% each at 3rd/4th and FEI.

It makes me wonder why a LOT of those higherlevel riders have so little to say here, and yet, some shy "unrated" posters have to say so MUCH!

J-Lu
Oct. 13, 2007, 01:23 AM
Fourth level test three on a horse I started at intro as a 5-year old freakishly obese lawn ornament. She's my current ride. We earned the AA USDF regional championship at third level last year. We scored mid 60s early in this season but had a trailering 'issue' (butt bar was accidentally raised, she was still attached) that compounded over the summer. Next year, PSG-when she's ready (and I can afford the duds). I'm particularly proud because as a graduate student/postdoc, I've never had enough money for regular training/lessons/custom anything. But I've had some great trainers who worked with my sporadic schedule and poverty and I consider myself very very lucky.

Evented through Novice (won and placed), did junior jumpers as a teen.

J.

grayarabpony
Oct. 13, 2007, 09:12 AM
What level do you ride at, Caponlap?

ltw
Oct. 13, 2007, 09:56 AM
This sampling of this poll does not match up with USDF numbers. If you take a look at the USDF numbers, 20% make it to 4rth level and about 5% make it to PSG, 1-2% make it to GP. The rest are all 3rd level and below with the overwehlming bulk of the percentages at Training and First.

~Freedom~
Oct. 13, 2007, 11:30 AM
This sampling of this poll does not match up with USDF numbers. If you take a look at the USDF numbers, 20% make it to 4rth level and about 5% make it to PSG, 1-2% make it to GP. The rest are all 3rd level and below with the overwehlming bulk of the percentages at Training and First.

Since FEI includes three different levels ( not counting the special) that could be why the picture is a little different.

I would have liked the poll to have been broken down to

FEI--PSG
FEI--I-1
FEI--I-11
FEI--GP/special
FEI--Young Riders

I have notice one very prominent COTH member missing.

cinder88
Oct. 13, 2007, 01:06 PM
Freedom...you noticed that, too?

I've shown First level in regular shows and I've attempted 2nd at schooling shows.

I think, like any sport, if some of us had the fuinds/horses/trainers we could be much farther along than we are in terms of showing.

Just because I've never had access to better horses, doesn't mean I don't know enough to give advice on some topics that I am familiar with..


Cinder

SillyHorse
Oct. 13, 2007, 01:57 PM
I have notice one very prominent COTH member missing.
If you're referring to slc, I have shown in the same region for at least 10 years, and during that time have never ever know her to compete. I know her name from another board where she used to post. Hot air all the way.

FancyFree
Oct. 13, 2007, 02:03 PM
If you're referring to slc, I have shown in the same region for at least 10 years, and during that time have never ever know her to compete. I know her name from another board where she used to post. Hot air all the way.

That's hilarious. Is that true?

I'm all for the freedom to express your opinion, but I find some of these armchair trainers to be ridiculous. I've only shown at 1st level and I wouldn't presume to tell Anky how to ride. We have people who don't even ride dressage, or have ridden it for a week, weighing in. Too funny!

~Freedom~
Oct. 13, 2007, 02:12 PM
Freedom...you noticed that, too?

I've shown First level in regular shows and I've attempted 2nd at schooling shows.

I think, like any sport, if some of us had the fuinds/horses/trainers we could be much farther along than we are in terms of showing.

Just because I've never had access to better horses, doesn't mean I don't know enough to give advice on some topics that I am familiar with..


Cinder


I was hoping to see other like people that post here. I does give me insight to whether their advise is from real experience or just poppycock. Knowing what level other have shown at gives me an idea if I should word any responses in more simple terms or can use terms that are common to me and others, that have been through what I have without a long explanation.

I also have no problem with those that haven't made it all the way yet as they could still have experiences different that what I have experienced so their posts are just as valid as long as they are not embellished with fanciful stories that never happened.

fsf
Oct. 13, 2007, 02:18 PM
I'll play. I grew up riding bareback and western....started probably when I was about 4. Got hooked on dressage and am now competing my 6 year old mare at 3rd-3. It's very gratifying since she was the second foal born here at my farm when we started our warmblood breeding business. She's also the one who helped me earn my bronze medal.

Maude
Oct. 13, 2007, 02:30 PM
I have trained and competed 2 horses to PSG. Both had injuries before I could move them up to I1. My TB/QH had started ones and had a fabulous passage when she retired from competition. I earned my USDF Bronze Medal and 3/4 of my Silver Medal on her. I earned the last score for my Silver on my dutch warmblood mare. She was also schooling ones and piaffe when she was injured. She had a suspensory injury that will not hold up to the lateral work required at FEI. She is trail ridden western now and I currently don't have a partner to compete. I'm waiting for my 5 month old homebred Sir Sinclair filly (out of the dutch mare) to grow up and rise to the occasion. I'd love to ride GP on her someday, but the journey and relationship with my horses is more important to me.

CatOnLap
Oct. 13, 2007, 03:33 PM
Greyarabpony( sorry won't let me edit the title), if you click on the poll percentages, you can see everyone who has posted their level and I am up there. I have not competed in about 5 years due to a riding accident and a very busy work/family committment. But I posted the highest level at which I competed prior. And I do ride almost daily now. All of my horses are started/trained by me.

Dirigo
Oct. 13, 2007, 03:43 PM
GP
Gold , Silver and Bronze medallist

ltw
Oct. 13, 2007, 08:55 PM
I have ridden my whole life, in eventing, hunters, dressage. I became serious about dressage in my late 30's. I am now 51. I spent 18 years breeding warmbloods. With the money I spent breeding I could have bought two finished GP horses.

I have rehabbed one broken down 4rth level horse and shown him at 4rth numerous times for two seasons and PSG a few times.

I took one mare I owned since she was 3 from a broodmare to 4rth level and she gave out after an old stifle injury got in the way of collected work. I have trained and brought along numerous youngsters up through 3rd.

Usually I sell everything. NOw I am in the mode of trying to find one to keep and get help to bring all the way to FEI.

I am currently riding three very young green mares (ages 3,4 and 5), some I bred, some I purchased as foals... all by different stallions: Rhodes Scholar, Ruiz Solier and Rubin Royal. (All from the Rubinstein/Rohdiamant line with lots of Donnerhall thrown in on the mare line)

I retired my PSG horse this summer after he did his OTHER hind suspensory . I will give him some time and see if he can make it back but he has so many other health issues I am not optimistic.

It is a real kick in the teeth to go from riding tempi changes, P&P to starting back on a barely broke just turned 4 year old that can barely canter.

OH Well, keeps me young!!! Keeps me brave, keeps me active.

Carol O
Oct. 13, 2007, 11:20 PM
PSG.

Carol Ames
Oct. 14, 2007, 12:57 AM
4th

NoDQhere
Oct. 14, 2007, 10:05 AM
I competed through 3rd Level dressage and Intermediate Eventing. My SO is a USDF Bronze, Silver and Gold Medallist on a stallion that we trained ourselves.

JSwan
Oct. 14, 2007, 10:48 AM
1st

And I sucked and we were both bored and ring sour. Not our thing, unfortunately. Went on to eventing (BN/N) and then foxhunting. We're both happier - though I admit to being a closet DQ. I think dressage is the answer for just about everything.

grayarabpony
Oct. 14, 2007, 11:23 AM
Catonlap,

I hope your horse went more correctly than some of the rides critiqued in these threads.

CatOnLap
Oct. 14, 2007, 06:55 PM
Catonlap,

I hope your horse went more correctly than some of the rides critiqued in these threads.

Who can say these days what is correct. The still pictures never do it justice, and standards of the art have changed rapidly. That my horses are trained humanely, that they are safe even for rank beginners to get on and ride, that they stay sound into advanced age, that they enjoy the work as much as I do, that they stay fit and joyful, these things are all important to me. As they stay fit and sound, physically and mentally, so do I.

grayarabpony
Oct. 14, 2007, 08:26 PM
I was referring to videos; it can be hard to judge anything from a still photo.

Personally I don't believe the standards of dressage have changed for everyone, including judges.

ride-n-tx
Oct. 15, 2007, 12:43 AM
ok, i'll bite. i just discovered this bulletin board a short while ago and found a lot of good information and good advice. i may not have an impressive cv and i certainly have my own training issues that i am working through, but i love helping people when i can.

my confession is that i have never been to a recognized show. my "excuse" is that i haven't had the horses or the money. i started out doing hunters and jumpers and mostly had to catch-ride the horses that were acting up and intimidating their owners just to get time in the saddle. i have jumped 4ft courses, but when i first tried dressage about 2 years ago i found it to be much more difficult than i imagined, so i saw it as a good challenge and got hooked!

i just got my first horse this past weekend!!!! i am very passionate about dressage and i can't wait to start showing him. he will start at training level, but i hope to show another horse that i have been riding at 2nd level next year.

FireBreathingMad
Oct. 15, 2007, 08:33 AM
I'm sure it's a stupid question as it is obvious you are top-drawer. But humour me. What level are you? FEI?

SillyHorse
Oct. 15, 2007, 10:28 AM
:lol:

CatOnLap
Oct. 15, 2007, 11:14 AM
I was referring to videos; it can be hard to judge anything from a still photo.

Personally I don't believe the standards of dressage have changed for everyone, including judges.

You seem to have some personal interest in my achievements/qualifications grayarabpony, although I am not sure why. Perhaps if you are more specific, I can answer your questions. Feel free to PM me, as I am sorry to waste bandwidth on a topic which is of only personal interest.

I was surprised at the number of FEI riders who lurk here. I have not seen many of them post,( but I have just begun posting, and only read occasionally before this, so perhaps I am missing a lot of them). Their contributions would be extremely welcome, no doubt.

grayarabpony
Oct. 15, 2007, 01:03 PM
You seem to have some personal interest in my achievements/qualifications grayarabpony, although I am not sure why.


Sorry to disappoint but it's not a personal interest. What I do care about is people intimating that posters should not give their opinion about FEI rides if they haven't shown at that level. I liked what someone said earlier, that if you can't critique then you can't say anything good either. It's not as though there isn't collected and extended gaits or halts at lower levels than FEI.

J Lav
Oct. 15, 2007, 01:16 PM
I competed at I1 on a Suffolk Punch/TB that I trained and rode once a week from when he was bought by his owner as a just backed 4yo. The rest of the time he was ridden by his novice owner who had only competed at Prelim (training level).

Unfortunately an injury prevented him from going further at the age of 10!

I also had a NF/TB mare who I bought just backed and she competed PSG after we went as far as we could eventing (advanced one days).

My most advanced current ride is a coloured TBx who is at 3rd level now and hopefully PSG next year.

None of these horses cost more than £2k and they were all competetive, qualifying for regional and national champs and regularly scoring 65%+.

CatOnLap
Oct. 15, 2007, 04:55 PM
What I do care about is people intimating that posters should not give their opinion about FEI rides if they haven't shown at that level.

Perhaps you have mistaken me for someone else?

While I would be quick to admit that I may be at an age where going senile is soon expected, I do not recall ever saying anything of the sort. My main concern is the dearth of postings by the more experienced people, even though they are here, as evidenced by the poll.

grayarabpony
Oct. 15, 2007, 05:37 PM
My guess would be that some of the more experienced people have tests that look like those being critiqued.

doccer
Oct. 16, 2007, 01:26 AM
Shown First Level for 1.5 seasons. Horse came up lame this year :( Recognized Shows ONLY! If we could get a better counter-canter, We'd be ready fto show 2nd.

Carol O
Oct. 16, 2007, 10:15 PM
FEI, PSG. I rode training and first for years(!) before I finally figured out that to get to the upper levels you need the horse and the trainer who can take you there. So, I took care of those "problems" (great "problems" to take care of, as problems go!), raced up the levels, and am now taking time to immerse myself in the PSG. It is possible to learn how to push the buttons, but to really "know" it, you must spend time with the great horse and trainer to internalize it all.

There is a lesson here. Get the best horse and trainer you possibly can, and then enjoy the ride!