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View Full Version : I'm so sick of armchair trainers!



twnkltoz
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:01 PM
From those who think they could have handled Anky's accident better, to those who think they can diagnose all of a rider's problems by looking at a picture or 10-second video or reading a brief post on the internet, there are armchair trainers all over the internet. I'm sick of it!!

If you have never ridden and trained at the level of the person you're criticising, think carefully about what you choose to criticize them on. After a 10-year absence from horses, I came back thinking I knew plenty, because, after all, I was raised with them. I learned fast that I really didn't know anything, and I still don't after 2.5 years. Spend more time learning and less time throwing your opinion around.

If you have never seen someone ride, preferably for a period of time, you can't make judgements about their riding. I made the mistake a number of times of posting about my problems here or on other boards, seeking advice. I did get SOME good advice, but what I got more of was a variety of people who assumed they knew exactly what the problem was, inferring it from just a few words. My horse was tossing her head, so therefore I was way off balance, falling forward and back and yanking on her face. WHAT?? You don't know that. Anky's horse acted up in an awards ceremony, so he must be scared to death of her. So-and-so must be a bad rider because the horse she's riding in the video isn't relaxed. You can't tell any of this.

Does this mean there can't be any discussion of a horse or rider's faults? Of course not. But, limit your observations to things that are factual. Many people can see from a video if the horse is hitching or isn't straight. What you can't always tell is WHY...and making assumptions can be insulting and unfair to the rider--especially if you haven't even SEEN what happens, only read about it.

One more thing...horses are animals. Big ones. Sometimes they act up. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with how they're trained, how much discipline they get, how old they are, what breed they are, or who's riding them. Sometimes, they just do stuff.

Ok, end of rant. I'm really pissy this morning...I've just had it with people who think they know it all, more than people who are at the top of the sport or even just more experienced than they are. Flame away if you don't like what I've said; I don't really care.

Bluey
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:22 PM
You mean that you don't want to hear my opinion any more?:eek: :( :no: :cry:

merda
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:24 PM
Well said. Bravo...

snbess
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:25 PM
Well gosh, what would we talk about if we couldn't armchair quarterback/train? 90% of the threads on here would never exist.

Sandra

AnotherRound
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:32 PM
Dang, I don't know nothing about dressage, but, I can say one thing, there are few horses can get me off of them, that's how good I am at handling a screwy maneuver by one of them, and boy a big un ducked his head and threw back on me whilst mounting the other day and I landed hard in the dirt, and my trainer who was holding him got banged away and pin-balled off the fence. I am sure Anky is a hundred thousand times better screw-ball-stayer-on-er Than I will ever be in my entire life, and it just goes to show you, sometimes they just surprise the bjeezus out of us. You don't think she was unguarded during the awards? I'll bet she was, and didn't see it coming.

So what.

millerra
Oct. 5, 2007, 12:37 PM
And w/ a Big AMEN.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 5, 2007, 01:28 PM
If you ride, I mean really ride, and ride enough horses, enough times, you will fall off....well, that's my excuse and I'm sticking with it.

Bogey2
Oct. 5, 2007, 01:45 PM
pass the popcorn!:lol:
Did someone suggest that they could teach Anky how to stay on her horse??? ROFLMAO!!!!

FancyFree
Oct. 5, 2007, 01:53 PM
pass the popcorn!:lol:
Did someone suggest that they could teach Anky how to stay on her horse??? ROFLMAO!!!!

Yeah, that was pretty funny. This is without even seeing any video. It's kind of stupid to Monday morning quarterback without even seeing what actually happened.

Sandy M
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:04 PM
Oh, come on. I don't think that anybody even implied that the great AVG "shouldn't" or "couldn't" fall off. I think, to some degree, it's a case of, "Wow, it even happens to the best," not criticism, although, of course, there are some who will embrace the schadenfreude (sp?) of someone so controversial hitting the dirt. I don't think anyone's saying, "That could never happen to me because I don't do ...rollkur" or saying THEY are more expert than AVG.

Personally.... I've ridden in victory laps with screaming/clapping crowds and while my horse(s) never blew, other peoples' horses did, and no one thought the worse of them for it (but I don't recall any of them hitting the ground. ;0)

twnkltoz
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:11 PM
Someone on the AVG thread implied that the horse was scared of her because of her training methods, and that's why it happened. Another person said that she should know better how to handle her horse when he rears, and if she did she wouldn't have fallen.

FancyFree
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:15 PM
Someone on the AVG thread implied that the horse was scared of her because of her training methods, and that's why it happened. Another person said that she should know better how to handle her horse when he rears, and if she did she wouldn't have fallen.

Yes, this comment is not saying that falling off happens to everyone:


She's likely to get seriously injured or killed if she doesn't learn how to utilize the hindquarters to her advantage on those hot and unpredictable horses she rides. I believe that's one of the things you learn in pony club.

dutchmike
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:18 PM
A good post but I doubt it will stop the arm chair trainers;)

twnkltoz
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:20 PM
You're right dutchmike, it won't. But it sure made me feel better!

class
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:22 PM
yes, i wish people would stop talking about other riders, stop offering riding advice and stop asking so many stupid questions. internet chat boards shouldn't be about this kind of nonsense. they should be about... about... um.

mp
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:31 PM
From the "I won't be a busybody" clique thread ...


3. Not to make judgements [sic] about other people's actions or choices when there may be factors in their personal lives that you know nothing about, especially if they aren't hurting anyone.

C'mon, Twink. The armchair trainers aren't hurting anyone with their stupid remarks and maybe they're having a hard time in their personal lives right now. How about we cut them some slack?

And there's no need to keep posting threads about them. Anyone with two brain cells understands they don't know WTF they're talking about.

Dixon
Oct. 5, 2007, 02:59 PM
yes, i wish people would stop talking about other riders, stop offering riding advice and stop asking so many stupid questions. internet chat boards shouldn't be about this kind of nonsense. they should be about... about... um.

. . . . marketing. Rave about the trendiest brands, post videos of young trainers performing miracles on difficult horses, use your business name as your user name and put your business website in your signature.

goeslikestink
Oct. 5, 2007, 06:15 PM
pass the popcorn!:lol:
Did someone suggest that they could teach Anky how to stay on her horse??? ROFLMAO!!!!

haha could have been me if he bucked her off as i am always telling people how to stay on
if it does haha


hey twinkltoz i read your profile --
and your advice isnt bad -- and like this post-- as long as you do what you preach as a trianer
then you have no worries

me myself and I - the english language is not as easy as you think as many parts of england pronounce one word one way and that same word differently take either -- either can be both

as my mum would say- good better best never let it rest till your good is better and your better is best

Carol O
Oct. 5, 2007, 08:28 PM
Years ago I had it with all the people who would sit in the shade in their shorts and halter tops, sipping ice tea, talking down the riders who were out in the show ring in 105 degree heat wearing black coats and riding our hearts out. They could all do it better. Yeah, right.

Rusty Stirrup
Oct. 6, 2007, 09:28 AM
You can't change human nature. We can only strive to be more like animals.

petitefilly
Oct. 7, 2007, 05:35 PM
You can't change human nature. We can only strive to be more like animals.

Lions on the scent of blood? LOL It's sure does stink sometimes when the kitchen gets to burning like a wild fire! ;)

Sannois
Oct. 7, 2007, 07:40 PM
From those who think they could have handled Anky's accident better, to those who think they can diagnose all of a rider's problems by looking at a picture or 10-second video or reading a brief post on the internet, there are armchair trainers all over the internet. I'm sick of it!!

If you have never ridden and trained at the level of the person you're criticising, think carefully about what you choose to criticize them on. After a 10-year absence from horses, I came back thinking I knew plenty, because, after all, I was raised with them. I learned fast that I really didn't know anything, and I still don't after 2.5 years. Spend more time learning and less time throwing your opinion around.

If you have never seen someone ride, preferably for a period of time, you can't make judgements about their riding. I made the mistake a number of times of posting about my problems here or on other boards, seeking advice. I did get SOME good advice, but what I got more of was a variety of people who assumed they knew exactly what the problem was, inferring it from just a few words. My horse was tossing her head, so therefore I was way off balance, falling forward and back and yanking on her face. WHAT?? You don't know that. Anky's horse acted up in an awards ceremony, so he must be scared to death of her. So-and-so must be a bad rider because the horse she's riding in the video isn't relaxed. You can't tell any of this.

Does this mean there can't be any discussion of a horse or rider's faults? Of course not. But, limit your observations to things that are factual. Many people can see from a video if the horse is hitching or isn't straight. What you can't always tell is WHY...and making assumptions can be insulting and unfair to the rider--especially if you haven't even SEEN what happens, only read about it.

One more thing...horses are animals. Big ones. Sometimes they act up. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with how they're trained, how much discipline they get, how old they are, what breed they are, or who's riding them. Sometimes, they just do stuff.

Ok, end of rant. I'm really pissy this morning...I've just had it with people who think they know it all, more than people who are at the top of the sport or even just more experienced than they are. Flame away if you don't like what I've said; I don't really care.
Start a thread like this. Do you like Train wrecks. This just adds fuel to the fire that I believe has gone out. Forget it. What difference does it make, people will always think what they want. Its just a waste of time.
:no:

twnkltoz
Oct. 7, 2007, 08:17 PM
Because I think people should know when they've been bad. Also, because I was in a pissy mood and felt like taking it out on you.

EasyStreet
Oct. 7, 2007, 08:18 PM
I know that I have asked for advice on this BB a number of times and I expect to read them all and some I will dismiss, some I will aply. But I asked and so I appreciate someones time in responding to my post. And I must say that quite often replies to my post contain "diclaimers" such as, Without seeing you and your horse it is difficult to be certain, but.... , or check with your trainer, but..., or IMO. So what is the problem with people having their own opinion and expressing it, especially when it's solicited!?!?!!? ;)

CarrieK
Oct. 8, 2007, 05:36 AM
Also, because I was in a pissy mood and felt like taking it out on you.
Booyahh!! :D

Sannois
Oct. 8, 2007, 05:55 AM
Because I think people should know when they've been bad. Also, because I was in a pissy mood and felt like taking it out on you.

Good excuse to cause trouble. Whatever makes you happy! Admit it you ADORE train wrecks:lol::lol::lol::D

slc2
Oct. 8, 2007, 07:06 AM
Yes, people do like train wrecks. Some like them more than others. When it gets to the point where someone relishes reading fights on an internet bulletin board, all I can say is - that's pretty damned sad. it's amazing to think that someone would enjoy seeing people get upset and argue or try to foment that. i'm not talking about an exchange of ideas, but a flat out nasty cat fight, name calling, insulting exchange, accompanied by lots of nasty little PM's with more insults and gossip.

but that's the case. some people have so little going on in their life that they get excited out of watching people argue on the internet.

As far as training advice on a bb, there are many aspects.

First of all, many training problems here are very, very simple, basic ones. I would say 99% of them have nothing to do with dressage at all - just basic obedience and getting along with a horse. Horsey doesn't listen to mommy's leg, what do i do if horsey wants to go back to the barn....these are very simple basic things that simply say that people need more supervision and help than they will accept. it's wierd, but someone who would refuse help of local instructors based on their lack of knowledge, is perfectly willing to go to the internet and try and get free advice - but it's from people who have never seen them or their horse, and for who they have NO idea what the person's experience is - that's patently wierd.

in one sense, ALL dressage IS is these very simple basic things. i understand that. the grand prix rider is working on accepting contact, being more through, forward off the leg, too, but he's dealing with a case where these adjustments are much more subtle, and where hopefully problems aren't caused by rider instability or confusion about very basic issues, what aids to apply in a given situation, what is a half halt, what is a half pass, what do i do if i apply the 'aids recipe' i read from a book and the horse doesn't do something.

these are all things people need to learn from a trainer.

i suspect that a lot of the questions like that - are people wanting to do things their trainers have said they aren't ready yet for. so they come here wanting to know how to do half pass or flying lead change or extended trot, because trainer is saying, 'you're not ready for that, first you have to be able to sit the trot and do a round circle', or similar. they don't see the reason for that so they come here and ask for 'the secret button'. they feel it's all about just pushing buttons - if someone tells them what button it is, they will be cool like the other riders.

Then there are the cases where the problem is that the person doesn't want to listen to an instructor that is already giving them lessons. If you say, listen to the trainer, someone pipes up with 'trainers suck, they know nothing', or the very popular, 'don't listen to the trainer as a rule, you have to make your own way, taking a little of this and that as you choose and decide what's best for your horse, you know the horse better'. that's a very popular response, and always allows the rider to avoid anything he finds difficult or that presses his comfort zone boundary, or even SUGGESTS he needs to learn to sit better, while discrediting a trainer who may have something valuable to offer, and resulting in a rider who isn't riding dressage at all, but a mish mash of fragments that don't fit together, but are comfortable for the person and don't involve him changing the way he thinks.

also popular is some vague sounding 'classic' mumbo jumbo that sounds really touchy feely and has a lot of pretty words.

progression in dressage is all about very, very simple things. there is, in fact, an unvarying, rigid and very unchangeable sst of rules about how to succeed in dressage.

the first need is lessons, much more often than one thinks one needs them, from a knowledgeable trainer, not someone to teaches some mish mash of appealing things that have nothing to do with dressage.

the second need is for an appropriate horse. a horse the student can ride and control and relax on, not something that flatters his ego when he sees it in the dealer's yard, and very often, not the cheapest, most ruined, untrained horse he can find.

the third need is for time. lots and lots of time.

the fourth thing is some kind of commonsense that leads to recognizing where one is at and setting up an appropriate situation that is safe and conducive to learning, not living in dreams and exceptions, but looking at the averages and the reality and making a realistic, sensible plan to accomplish what you want, and sticking to it. recognizing it takes time to go up the levels - far more time than you imagined, and far more work. no, someone doesn't get their bronze medal and then go out and buy a 'team horse'. someone doesn't ride training level for 20 yrs and buy a grand prix horse and get a quality performance or an easy trip up to the stars. the older person doesn't need a young unbroke horse in most cases, and the person who rode trained older horses for decades is going to have a SERIOUS problem getting on an untrained horse from the race track. the person who leased a horse and rode 2x a week isn't in most cases going to adjust well to training a youngster daily, and isn't prepared to do so after riding older school horses for years. the person who's never competed at GP isn't in a position to recognize or choose an 'international prospect' to go to the olympics, and identifying a really superior young prospect isn't really easy or transparent. there is no way to do dressage successfully and avoid learning the sitting trot, and no, it's not easy, 'if it isn't easy it's wrong' is wrong, and it's not like hacking around on the trails on a western pleasure horse. if you want to do that - do it, but that's not what dressage is like. it's not a refuge for those afraid to jump, it requires an immense amount of concentration, effort and dedication to do well.

the fifth thing is a willingness to discard ideas and ways of thinking, and to be open to the possibility that not everything in books is exactly how it is. a book like "In One Arena" or "Dressage with the EXperts" gets oddly little traffic here, where something idealistic, general, vague and touchy feely- gets a whole lot.

everyone says, 'people want it easy and quick' and everyone nods sagely and agrees, but everyone thinks that's not them, all the while buying inappropriate horses and setting up unrealistic goals - then they need help.

it is still just like axel steiner said - we buy first the long coat, then the horse, then consider the possibility of taking lessons - perhaps.

it's a very, very strange world in dressage in the usa for 99% of people - we give lots of mouth service to the classical ideals - but have so many myths about dressage that we live by, and the internet is the biggest place where these myths are reinforced. anyone who disagrees is disingenuous and is hooted at and insulted.

CatOnLap
Oct. 8, 2007, 10:04 AM
well, my armchair is pefectly trained and I have a lot of people on "ignore" here, that is truly a wonderful internet training tool! So what I see on a lot of threads is actually fairly good discourse with a lot of humour thrown in for good measure.Twinkltoz, I suggest you turn on your ignore function! it makes the reading of this forum so much faster without all the BS!

twnkltoz
Oct. 8, 2007, 11:19 AM
Good excuse to cause trouble. Whatever makes you happy! Admit it you ADORE train wrecks:lol::lol::lol::D
LOL of course I do! I just hate stupidness.

;)

slc2
Oct. 8, 2007, 11:33 AM
but by definition, trainwrecks always include 'stupidness', which for bulletin board purposes, is defined as 'stuff one does not agree with'.

Ponyclubrocks
Oct. 8, 2007, 11:34 AM
But I will confess that I enjoy a good rollicking trainwreck...especially when I am stuck on an all day net meeting,where tedious discussion is droning on and on and on and I can escape for a bit on the BB.

In addition, I actually learn things here now and again and I do appreciate hearing a range of opinions on topics, even when some of them are not "keepers".

That said I am sometimes astonished by the mean spiritedness of some of the posts. I enjoy and appreciate the wit, the humor, the sarcasm even, just not the plain old fashioned nastiness that sometimes appears. There are some serious personality disordered people here from time to time. But I keep coming back for more...hummmm, says something about me I guess.:lol::lol:

twnkltoz
Oct. 8, 2007, 01:31 PM
but by definition, trainwrecks always include 'stupidness', which for bulletin board purposes, is defined as 'stuff one does not agree with'.
How about, I hate stupidness that isn't funny. I love funny stupidness: for example, posting link to a picture of my new mare, and when you open it it's an ugly old lizard. Or, funny pictures of ground hogs. That's good internet right there.

mp
Oct. 8, 2007, 02:26 PM
but by definition, trainwrecks always include 'stupidness', which for bulletin board purposes, is defined as 'stuff one does not agree with'.

Not always, slc. There are times when one can agree with other ones that what another one has posted is, indeed, "stupidness."


Twink, you're easily amused. :lol:

twnkltoz
Oct. 8, 2007, 03:41 PM
Yeah.

sing
Oct. 8, 2007, 06:28 PM
But how in this day and age, do yo define "armchair"???
If the world really is flat, then you don't have to be training with the Ms.'s G or VB to have a dog in this hunt.
It can be as simple as your own trainer showing up at your barn out in south sucotash one fine day and telling you that they just got back from great clinic with a trainer from Holland and they demonstrated this phenomanal technique that we are gong to try right now and you are just going to love it!!!!!!

Then little ole you is going to need some straight up answers about about what is going on in the new world order of dressage.
And needing those answers and asking those questions isn't necessarily an attack on anyone else's training philosophy, you have a responsibility to your horse to know what their training is based on and where it is going.

sm
Oct. 8, 2007, 07:23 PM
Then little ole you is going to need some straight up answers about about what is going on in the new world order of dressage.

and good luck trying to see their rollkur warm ups before the tests because the warm-ups are closed to the public. So... how good for the horse can the technique be? And one can't photograph Anky warming up or they can be sued?

Discusion here is supposed to bring information that one can't get first hand, to separate the wheat from the chaff and become more knowledgable. Unfortunately, we get people throwing insults at each other, the "armchair trainer" insult being somewhat tepid and not worthy of a true COTHer on his/her high horse.

LyndaPellitteri31
Oct. 8, 2007, 07:46 PM
I always thought armchair threads were hilarious. It's funny seeing people rant and rave on how professionals do things. Now some of it is incredibly annoying, but most of it for me is funny. Shoot, everyone falls off their horse. I didn't see an armchair thread on Beezie Madden though.

twnkltoz
Oct. 8, 2007, 09:41 PM
"Armchair trainer" is an insult unworthy of blah blah blah? You actually think you can tell someone on the internet, whom you've never seen ride, what all of their problems are? You think it's appropriate to say, "gee, Anky should know how to stop a horse from rearing by now" or "see, Coby didn't have a perfect test. Must be because Rollkur is so bad." Come on, now.

I never said anything about exchanging ideas or discussing technique. I think all that's great. I also like to ask questions and weigh the answers. However, when someone tells me I have a balance problem because my horse likes to toss her head, or whatever other BS diagnosis when they've never even seen me ride, THAT is armchair training and doesn't do anyone any good. When someone says that Anky or Coby didn't have a perfect test because they rollkur their horses, that's armchair training--how could you possibly know WHAT that horse's problem is??

Catty remarks about FEI riders by training level riders are just ridiculous. I can say that because I AM a training level rider. Sure, I can recognise some of the basics of FEI rides as being good or bad, but I don't pretend to think that I know half of what goes on during an FEI test. I've ridden ONE FEI horse on a longe line and I can tell you that it is a whole different world from my little arab. I know enough to know that I shouldn't presume anything.

And Lynda, the reason you don't see an armchair thread on Beezie is because she doesn't do rollkur. People just LOVE to pick on Anky and apparently now Coby, so they can prove their point about how DEVASTATINGLY AWFUL rollkur is. "Oh, he's kicking out in his tempis. Must be Rollkur!" "Oh, he freaked out in an awards ceremony. Must be Rollkur!"

Mozart
Oct. 9, 2007, 12:29 PM
I would think that the easiest way to prevent armchair trainers from giving you advice is to not ask for any....

It's like internet dating. "Why yes, I am 5'10" size 8 blonde with a degree in human sexuality. What, you don't believe me?"

As for the unsolicited advice to Anky et al.... Really, you just have to laugh it off.

Hony
Oct. 9, 2007, 01:26 PM
When did stupidness become a word :)

fiona
Oct. 9, 2007, 01:34 PM
Hony, it's not just a word
For some people it's a full time job.

gr8fulrider
Oct. 9, 2007, 01:41 PM
When did stupidness become a word :)

Supply and demand.... :lol:

spotted mustang
Oct. 9, 2007, 01:43 PM
internet boards are like everything else in life: 90% of it is crap; you just have to decide whether it's worth sticking around for the other 10%.

flshgordon
Oct. 9, 2007, 02:35 PM
Hony, it's not just a word
For some people it's a full time job.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I thought I was the only one who noticed that someone just created the word "stupidness".....I can't even comment further...:winkgrin:

twnkltoz
Oct. 9, 2007, 06:15 PM
I was wondering when someone would notice. Irony is one of my favorite comedic devices.

CarrieK
Oct. 9, 2007, 10:57 PM
When did stupidness become a word :)
Oh, about the same time "hony" did.

;)








because it's either a horse or a pony, not both at once

LE
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:13 AM
Bottom line? I appreciate ALL riders. Anky is a lovely rider and seems like a lovely person. I am hoping she wasn't hurt by her fall. I can sit a buck some days, not on others. Depends on the horse, depends on my day. I can honestly say that I don't ride with stirrups as long as Anky, which probably doesn't help her stay in the saddle.

For the OP--it bothered me a lot when people critisized Amy Tryon, but I realized this---I can't change people's views. I can have my own views, and I can research about Rolkur method, rather than believing what I read on these webboards. The truth is much more interesting that what is sensationalized on the web.

Bottom line? I'm allowed to enjoy horses, I have my beliefs. If others choose to critisize, that says more about them than anything they write.

I made a post about Anky being taken off with, and having a giggle--ONLY because to me, it showed that no matter WHAT level you are, you can STILL have problems with horses. I meant NO malice by that, but apparently everyone felt they knew me better than I do.

Meh! I really don't care. I love horses, I ride, I show, I'm sore from an awesome lesson yesterday and I saved(I hope!) a baby raccoon injured in a hit and run.

SandyUHC
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:24 AM
...and I saved(I hope!) a baby raccoon injured in a hit and run.

Now this definitely proves a point. (BTW, did he get the license plate number?)

We should all chip in and get him a little armchair. And a quilt.

STF
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:25 AM
After a while you learn to smile and say........ "Well Bless your Heart".........
:lol:

I have found that most people who are real riders and real trainer dont sit and verbally beat up other trainers and riders, because 1) they dont have time 2) they know dressage is a "deep subject" and training methods can vary slightly from horse to horse.
The ones who are talking are not worth the time and effort, so ignore and move on! :) As you said, most of those yappin their jaws are usually limited riders, limted show experience and limited training (unless they make it up and lie about it..... but im not even gona go there right now....... grrrrrrrrr!)

twnkltoz
Oct. 10, 2007, 12:16 PM
I made a post about Anky being taken off with, and having a giggle--ONLY because to me, it showed that no matter WHAT level you are, you can STILL have problems with horses. I meant NO malice by that, but apparently everyone felt they knew me better than I do.

Meh! I really don't care. I love horses, I ride, I show, I'm sore from an awesome lesson yesterday and I saved(I hope!) a baby raccoon injured in a hit and run.

I can totally understand that, and if that's how it was presented I'd be all over it. I admit it, it makes me feel better to know that the top riders aren't gods!

Good job on the raccoon. :)

meupatdoes
Oct. 10, 2007, 01:07 PM
This is too good an example of armchair riding (http://shnookems.livejournal.com/36547.html) to resist posting here. (I actually had to dig through the archives to find it, but it is worth it.)

Please note the part where the poster (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/meupatdoes/UtterCrapRiding.jpg) writes publicly, on the internet, for all the world to see, that Anky "wouldn't be able to ride one side of" her horse.

So yes. Armchair riding is annoying.
But it can also be HILARIOUS.

AnotherRound
Oct. 10, 2007, 02:43 PM
I have to agrree with the above - the entertainment value is high, so where's the real harm? I wouldn't get my panties in a twist about armchair trainers. We all have a semi-comfortable place at the computer keyboard, some of us have something of worth to contribute to the effort, and some are pure entertainment. I think most of us can sort through the hypergraphia (run-on, obsessive writing) of the lost and lonely or the old and forgotton, from the worth-while consideration and instruction of the thinking horseman.

I say relax. Pull up an armchair. Pour a glass of sherry. Enjoy.

twnkltoz
Oct. 10, 2007, 04:42 PM
Off to finish of that bottle of pinot, per AR's orders...

Dressage Art
Oct. 10, 2007, 05:23 PM
Read only original post, so...
I had very useful lessons from life long trainers who never rode above 1st level, but they were excellent with young problematic horses or great seat coaches. I wasted money for lessons with some trainers who trained puddle tricks to GP. Now, I find it useful to train with an FEI trainers, who teach basics, have a unique approach to different horses with different problems, have a light hand, patient temper, don't chaise blue ribbons, and who have a strong theory. I really enjoy riders/trainers who let horses be horses as well.

Nutmeg29
Oct. 10, 2007, 07:27 PM
Thanks, DressageArt, for making Dixon's earlier post clear to me! Heretofore I've been a bewildered lurker, but now I understand the rest of Dixon's answer to just what this forum SHOULD be about, if not talking about riders and offering riding advice, it should be about . . .


. . . . marketing. Rave about the trendiest brands, post videos of young trainers performing miracles on difficult horses, use your business name as your user name and put your business website in your signature.

perpetual_novice
Oct. 10, 2007, 07:38 PM
This is too good an example of armchair riding (http://shnookems.livejournal.com/36547.html) to resist posting here. (I actually had to dig through the archives to find it, but it is worth it.)

Please note the part where the poster (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/meupatdoes/UtterCrapRiding.jpg) writes publicly, on the internet, for all the world to see, that Anky "wouldn't be able to ride one side of" her horse.

So yes. Armchair riding is annoying.
But it can also be HILARIOUS.

You have to admit, "Moose" is very aptly named. ;)

EdwynEdwyn
Oct. 10, 2007, 08:47 PM
You have to admit, "Moose" is very aptly named. ;)

No kidding!!!

FancyFree
Oct. 10, 2007, 11:45 PM
This is too good an example of armchair riding (http://shnookems.livejournal.com/36547.html) to resist posting here. (I actually had to dig through the archives to find it, but it is worth it.)

Please note the part where the poster (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/meupatdoes/UtterCrapRiding.jpg) writes publicly, on the internet, for all the world to see, that Anky "wouldn't be able to ride one side of" her horse.

So yes. Armchair riding is annoying.
But it can also be HILARIOUS.

It looks like that's a teenager. In my experience, teenagers are "armchair" everything. What don't they know? It's the older armchair know it alls that irk me. Not so much that I can't enjoy them though. ;)

petitefilly
Oct. 11, 2007, 11:24 AM
This is too good an example of armchair riding (http://shnookems.livejournal.com/36547.html) to resist posting here. (I actually had to dig through the archives to find it, but it is worth it.)
So yes. Armchair riding is annoying.
But it can also be HILARIOUS.


LOL I enjoyed that. See, armchair quarterbacks are everywhere. Learn to smile and enjoy the jokes, people tend to take mirth about their sport with a choke hold. Let it go. Let it go........ you will live longer.


I still like yanking on Anky, any spare time to unload on a stranger doing a hell of lot more than me is fun........<joke> Get a grip on your saddle. :)

LE
Oct. 11, 2007, 12:20 PM
I didn't see the accident with the wee little coon, but saw the muddy tire tracks and the poor little guy stunned at the side of the road. Hopefully he'll be ok. I waited for the Wildlife rescue for 1.5 hrs, and I was SO glad I had the time to do that.

When you have a talent and you do well with that ability, people are always going to try and cut that person down. I'd like to see THEM attempt to ride Anky's horses to the ability she does.

sm
Oct. 11, 2007, 01:26 PM
Well gosh, what would we talk about if we couldn't armchair quarterback/train? 90% of the threads on here would never exist.

Sandra

Including this thread, which is yet another attempt to armchair quarterback/train people. Ironic, isn't it...

BTW, glad the coon was rescued, hopefully he/she's better now.