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kahjul
Sep. 29, 2007, 09:53 PM
Being an ex-eventer, this seems like a good idea to me. I have a young dressage horse, showing 1st level. We work hard (in the ring) 4 days a week, and trail ride on the buckle at a walk 1 day. She lives out so fittness isn't the issue-she always runs and plays hard at feeding time, and definately feels fresh and fit enough for the current work. My trainer is strictly dressage and see's no reason for gallops (or long trots, etc). I feel like my canter work would be better if my horse ever got to gallop under saddle. The rings at the barn aren't large enough, so I was considering going to either an event or reining barn for a week so we could get in some gallops. Footing is an issue-I don't want to gallop in the pastures or other areas that aren't maintained. Is this idea stupid/unneccessary/harmful/ok/brilliant for a dressage horse??

Welkin007
Sep. 29, 2007, 10:18 PM
I think it would be good, mind you I'm not a professional or extremely experienced in dressage. But, if your horse can mentally handle it (which I think most horses can, its the rider who can't always handle it) then I think it would be great! I mean, ring work gets old, and stretching out their muscles and letting them blow off some steam and do something very natural seems like a good idea.

I've only let my horse really gallop a few times, because I didn't trust him well enough. However, at my last dressage show (Training) after the show where we got 68.5% and 66% (only telling scores so you know we're not just yee-haw and take our riding seriously) I went to the fairground's exercise track and let him run!

We didn't go full out because the footing was harder than I like, but boy he had fun! Much more relaxed and had this air about him afterwards that I really enjoyed. Oh, he's an OTTB too :D

Pics:
http://s5.photobucket.com/albums/y159/sparkyblue/?action=view&current=DSC_0208.jpg

http://s5.photobucket.com/albums/y159/sparkyblue/?action=view&current=DSC_0206.jpg

I plan on galloping him more in the future :)

yellowbritches
Sep. 29, 2007, 10:41 PM
A good pipe opener can do wonders on the canter work! My new horse (he is headed to a career in eventing, but about 95% of his work right now is all on his dressage) is weak in his canter, but I get the best work out of him when I take him out of the ring, hike up my stirrups and give him a little gallop. I usually get several days of really good canter work out of him after that, because he has stretched out his muscles, re-installed the forward, and isn't bored to tears with 20m circle after 20m circle. I don't do it a lot, as he won't be eventing at all this fall and he is a handful even in his unfit state, but just enough that we both have a little fun and remember what a REAL canter feels like.

I may get reamed for this, but I routinely say that I much rather watch a 4 star event horse's canter work than a Grand Prix dressage horse's canter work. I think it is because they spend a great deal of time doing gallops and using all their gears...they KNOW how to canter.

No reason not to be picky about the footing. When you're out hacking, scout for good fields, lanes, or quiet roads with decent footing. A hill is best. Only gallop when you feel the footing is perfect. I wouldn't worry about doing it with much regularity, just every now and then. Maybe occasionally switch out your walk hack with a trot and canter hack. I also suggest hauling out your jumping saddle (if you still have it) to do your gallop in...you will be far more comfortable and put in a far better position to safely gallop than if you did it in a dressage saddle.

ride-n-tx
Sep. 30, 2007, 12:02 AM
i agree with yellowbritches (on most of what was said, i would just rather watch the grand prix horses personally ;)). galloping should not be detrimental to the horse's training, as long as it is controlled and within reason of course. it can also be used to keep the horse in front of the leg. if the horse gets lazy and drops behind the leg you can bring them to the gallop and then back to a more collected canter.

and besides, you've got to practice for those victory gallops!

Sithly
Sep. 30, 2007, 12:58 AM
I absolutely gallop my horse. I think it is a great mental refresher for him. He is usually the lazy type, and I find a good gallop invigorates the both of us. It definitely improves his ring work.

I don't know what your area is like, but around here, the gravel roads are great for a gallop after a nice, long rain. They get soft and springy. But I know the type of gravel varies depending on where you live, so might not work for you. We have lots of sand here.

Nothing wrong with a nice open field, too, as long as you've scouted for holes.

PaddyUK
Sep. 30, 2007, 03:58 AM
We have a nice field with a slight incline and Jack gets a good gallop up there.

Some of the others are just too steep.

Would love to have a track like Welkin to use. But nothing like that this side of Nottingham.

You guys seem to have much better facilities available to you than the average horseowner over here.

Paddy

goeslikestink
Sep. 30, 2007, 05:19 AM
guess i am lucky i often gallop my horses but theres always a but

where i gallop them is over many places and oer those places i often walk trot canter or gallop or school over the area - like leg yeilds schoulder ins etc

why- becuase a i dont want my horse to think just becuase it goes of that area
that in its mind we can do xyz as to gallop and then get over excited becuase it knows it can when it gets there
2-- because ia m the boss and you go when i say and not before
3-- because it will also teavh the horse the start from the end of an area and horse will actomatically pull up or slow dwon if i have a novice out with me

goeslikestink
Sep. 30, 2007, 05:58 AM
and also in some showing classes wether thats top level or not
you have to show a horse galloping -- normally behind the line of horses being shown in lower level in upper level as part of your display in front of the judge and both ways

either way to gallop your in control
for fun or for show or to race - or for the horse himself to have a blow for they need to sometimes

Equibrit
Sep. 30, 2007, 01:24 PM
I wouldn't consider a horse's training to be complete unless he was galloped regularly.

XHalt
Sep. 30, 2007, 01:33 PM
I let my horse gallop up a big hill everday after we are done working. It's his reward and then we cool out on the way back with lots of stops for grass. :)

snoopy
Sep. 30, 2007, 02:11 PM
absolutely...I concider it "supervised turnout". Both my guys love it. And I find that ALL my horse's gaits are improved by this.


And I toatally agree with equibrit's post....there is a FOUTH gait, and I think some riders forget that.

mcm7780
Sep. 30, 2007, 02:49 PM
and besides, you've got to practice for those victory gallops!

I used to event so galloping was part of my "normal" training so I can't speak about dressage-specific training but I have to say that ride-n-tx's comment alone should be enough to convince anyone that galloping is neccessary! :lol: hehe

Dixon
Sep. 30, 2007, 03:04 PM
Good for horse's heart and mind. My caution would be that galloping makes the horse more fit, and you don't want the horse too fit for his dressage job. That's where dressage becomes unpleasant for event horses that are tuned up and fueled up for long gallops and challenging jumps, and can barely contain themselves for quiet dressage work. So as long as you gallop with enough moderation that you don't turn your horse into a super-athlete who constantly wants to sprint, galloping is fine.

austin
Sep. 30, 2007, 03:17 PM
Ex-eventer here too.

I do interval training on both my laid back WBs, once a week. One had a breathing problem his first summer with me and after a fall/winter of adding the interval training (2 trot sets and 2 gallop sets) he now has great air. Work up to 2 6 minute trots and 2 4 minute canter/gallops with 1-2 minutes of walking between each set. easy down the hills and strong up them.

(I hope I get this right) Jennie Loriston Clarke once told us that at the Olympics or the World Championships (she won the Bronze), her horse was feeling behind the leg so the the last ride before her test she took him out on a track nearby and did a gallop. Of course she was an event rider too.

I think Reiner Klimke also believed in jumping and galloping his dressage horses.

doesn't hurt the dressage rider to get a little wind in their hair once and a while.

Ozzie
Sep. 30, 2007, 04:05 PM
Too chicken/injured to gallop them under saddle, but they are all chased at a gallop around a 2 AC irrigated field for about 10 minutes regularly. They love it, and the young ones grow up fit.

Drvmb1ggl3
Sep. 30, 2007, 04:15 PM
You mean there are people that don't gallop??? :lol:

Yeah, I've run into a few myself. One place I was at, Dressage barn, I used to gallop most of the other boarders horses for them. I would agree with the sentiment expressed earlier that a horse's training would be incomplete with some galloping.

Klimke was a big proponent of taking them out on the galloping track, but then he was an ex-eventer. Hmmm, seems to be a trend here.

sm
Sep. 30, 2007, 04:49 PM
...I was considering going to either an event or reining barn for a week so we could get in some gallops. Footing is an issue-I don't want to gallop in the pastures or other areas that aren't maintained. Is this idea stupid/unneccessary/harmful/ok/brilliant for a dressage horse??

I think the mental break would be wonderful for the horse as well, go for it. Cross training is good as well.... have fun and good luck!

appychik
Sep. 30, 2007, 05:12 PM
I love a good gallop, now and then. However, my guy is built downhill, so it takes a lot to keep him up in the bridle and off his front end. Definitely gets them up and forward though. It's good for the brain too, I think.

kahjul
Sep. 30, 2007, 05:33 PM
well good! I found a place not too far from the barn that has a small track. The footing is great and they don't charge too much for use. I'm going to haul over there next week and see how it goes. I can probably swing doing it a couple times a month.

ride-n-tx
Sep. 30, 2007, 07:23 PM
My caution would be that galloping makes the horse more fit, and you don't want the horse too fit for his dressage job. That's where dressage becomes unpleasant for event horses that are tuned up and fueled up for long gallops and challenging jumps, and can barely contain themselves for quiet dressage work. So as long as you gallop with enough moderation that you don't turn your horse into a super-athlete who constantly wants to sprint, galloping is fine.

i disagree with Dixon here. i think that variety is wonderfully beneficial to the horse, and fitness is essential for the dressage horse. dressage work is very physically challenging and increased fitness will only help the horse. that being said, i don't think you can make a dressage horse "too fit", i think it is more the nature of the particular horse. just because you gallop or jump your horse doesn't mean that he/she will be unable to do ring work. each horse is different; some horses just inherently dislike ring work, some dislike trails, but most (i think) like variety. so, don't assume that all those ring-happy dressage horses are out of shape.

Lisa Cook
Sep. 30, 2007, 07:49 PM
There used to be a dressage show held on the infield of the Marshfield Fairgrounds race track on the south shore of Boston every Memorial Day weekend in the early 80's. I still remember Michael Poulin galloping his dressage horses around the track the day before the dressage show began. :)

And to answer the original question, yes, I gallop my horses. But I event, so I figure I don't count. :lol:

Dixon
Sep. 30, 2007, 07:57 PM
i disagree with Dixon here. i think that variety is wonderfully beneficial to the horse, and fitness is essential for the dressage horse. dressage work is very physically challenging and increased fitness will only help the horse. that being said, i don't think you can make a dressage horse "too fit", i think it is more the nature of the particular horse. just because you gallop or jump your horse doesn't mean that he/she will be unable to do ring work. each horse is different; some horses just inherently dislike ring work, some dislike trails, but most (i think) like variety. so, don't assume that all those ring-happy dressage horses are out of shape.

You are lumping together different kinds of fitness. I didn't think it necessary to get this technical in my first post, but apparently this clarification is needed. For horses as for humans, there are different kinds of fitness. The kind of fitness that comes from dressage training is but one type, and it has to do with muscle development and isometric strength. Both horse and rider need to learn how to carry themselves in particular postures and with weight suspended at various moments and at various parts of the body. Cardiovascular fitness is a different type of fitness. It involves honing the respiratory and cardiovascular system to allow sustained, high-intensity activity. A horse or person (think marathoner or racehorse) can be in top cardiovascular shape but not have the muscle development to carry heavy loads, balance on a very narrow track, or perform ballet leaps. Likewise, a ballet dancer may be fit in the muscular/skeletal and balance sense, but may not be able to run a fast race. A rider might be a great athlete off the horse, but not have the right abdomen, back and leg muscles for dressage.

So the point that you missed in my post is that a dressage horse need not be incredibly fit in the cardiovascular sense. We create unintended problems when we get a horse too cardiovascularly fit for its job, whether by endless longeing to work a horse down until it's tired enough to be compliant (then it takes longer and longer to tire the horse out), or by too much galloping that trains its heart and lungs to carry the horse along at an intense pace. Why else would it be necessary, for example, to let an OTTB have some "down time" before starting to retrain it as a riding horse? Do you think the level of fitness that a horse brings from the racetrack is somehow useful to dressage training?

Most of the people on this board are amateur dressage riders and having a too-fit horse can create a restless horse unwilling to focus on endless flatwork. Just be mindful what you're training toward.

Thomas_1
Sep. 30, 2007, 07:58 PM
I thought this was an odd question.... doesn't everyone gallop a horse ?

daisyduke
Sep. 30, 2007, 07:58 PM
A change is as good as a rest. Switching it up is always good for the mind and body. My daughter and I add in a mock race when we hack out and the horses love it. It has improved my daughter's horse's extended canter immensely. When we first started galloping, he didn't even know how to let go. Now he just loves it. It's good for his mind and physical condition to let it all out. Amazingly, its been good for his extended trot as well. Cross training is good for all athletes, 2 legged and 4.

Equibrit
Sep. 30, 2007, 08:30 PM
Dixon - without getting too technical - you're talking with the wrong end!

Thomas - the average DQ here would be afraid to leave the ring let alone actually gallop!

Hunting my dressage horse 3 times a week (field mastering) never hurt her dressage performance or concentration. Cardiovascular fitness can do nothing but help any horse. On the other hand; you would not require the same type of muscular fitness in a dressage horse as a race horse.
Downtime for race horses probably has more to do with jugging/no turnout than fitness!

Dixon
Sep. 30, 2007, 08:33 PM
If you can't articulate a better disagreement than that, Equibrit, I'll consider my comments a little more knowledgable than yours.

YoungFilly
Sep. 30, 2007, 10:09 PM
There used to be a dressage show held on the infield of the Marshfield Fairgrounds race track on the south shore of Boston every Memorial Day weekend in the early 80's. I still remember Michael Poulin galloping his dressage horses around the track the day before the dressage show began. :)

And to answer the original question, yes, I gallop my horses. But I event, so I figure I don't count. :lol:

How funny Lisa you should mention this place. I used to be a Rough Rider (barrel racer) in Halifax. I know exactly where the Marshfield Fairgrounds are.

Just today I galloped one of my horses. We went on a trail ride first thing this morning with about 7 horses. The rest of the field were ahead of her, and she wanted her head. I said, ok, lets go. It took her a second to realize I was serious, and the she started really kicking it in. First time for everything I guess. :winkgrin:

slc2
Oct. 1, 2007, 06:27 AM
if they're sound, yes.

Rusty Stirrup
Oct. 1, 2007, 07:02 AM
Used to go to the Marshfield Fair every year to watch the races. I never got to see the horse show though. I gallop when I trailer over to the nice, flat trails in the state park. Places to gallop near home are getting rare.

merrygoround
Oct. 1, 2007, 07:31 AM
If I remember correctly in Reiner Klimke videos horses are shown going over cavaletti, trotting, cantering and galloping on his training track before going into the arena. :)

Holly Jeanne
Oct. 1, 2007, 08:33 AM
My former instructor rode Grand Prix and she actually pushed me to gallop my young dressage horse. Said it was good for her mind and her forward. :D

XHalt
Oct. 1, 2007, 09:52 AM
There used to be a dressage show held on the infield of the Marshfield Fairgrounds race track on the south shore of Boston every Memorial Day weekend in the early 80's. I still remember Michael Poulin galloping his dressage horses around the track the day before the dressage show began. :)

And to answer the original question, yes, I gallop my horses. But I event, so I figure I don't count. :lol:

Did you know NEDA spring is moving there next year? Just like the old days. :)

see u at x
Oct. 1, 2007, 10:24 AM
I would LOVE to gallop my horse, but I suck enough as a rider that I am afraid I couldn't stay on. :no: (OK, not really, but I have some serious confidence issues that I'm ironing out.) Good Lord, she bucks at the canter, so I'd be petrified what she'd do at a gallop. :eek:

That being said, my dressage instructor (also a former eventer) says that she's going to make an eventer out of me yet... :lol:

akor
Oct. 1, 2007, 10:26 AM
Yes, yes, yes!

I consider it a reset button. Clears everyone's mind and reminds us of what the higher powers gave those animals legs for...;)

Oops, I should add a disclaimer. I am an oddity (on several levels) but I am probably the "least" dressagy raised on dressage rider in the world, meaning I have my base in dressage but really don't like it all that well other than it's the best way to develop a horse, of course. Just don't have the mind for it. Of course, I'm old, too, and we galloped a lot in the 70s, on everything from grade mix-breed to GP horse (they even used to jump, too!)

Reitsport
Oct. 1, 2007, 10:32 AM
Unfortunately, I think for alot of dressage riders (lower level ammies at least) the question is can you gallop your horse, can you let him/her out and bring him/her back? Can you control the horse after a full out gallop?

see u at x
Oct. 1, 2007, 10:41 AM
Unfortunately, I think for alot of dressage riders (lower level ammies at least) the question is can you gallop your horse, can you let him/her out and bring him/her back? Can you control the horse after a full out gallop?

Exactly. And for me, quite honestly, the answer is a resounding, "No." And I'm OK, with that for now. I know what my limitations are, and galloping MY particular mare, is not an option for me....yet. Now, if I were riding a packer, it's a different story. I have no fear of a horse that I know is going to take good care of me. The horse I take lessons on is like that, and she is helping me to finally get over my fears of even cantering because she is solid, kind, and knows her job.

sm
Oct. 1, 2007, 10:44 AM
Unfortunately, I think for alot of dressage riders (lower level ammies at least) the question is can you gallop your horse, can you let him/her out and bring him/her back? Can you control the horse after a full out gallop?

good point. Some DQ horses haven't seen a decent turnout in god knows how long, once they do finally get a tiny taste of freedom and they can finally stretch their legs...

I still think galloping is great for those who can.

akor
Oct. 1, 2007, 11:11 AM
Excuse me, but being a "lower level ammie" in dressage does NOT mean you aren't a good rider or that you can't control your horse.

To be honest, these days, I think it's more a dressage thing than level of rider.

Lawn Ornament
Oct. 1, 2007, 11:25 AM
Without a doubt... personally though I prefer to find nice hills to gallop up instead of using a track. The tendency is for horses to get strung out and on the forehand when they are galloping on a track, particularly if you already have a horse that's built downhill. I find that hills naturally ask the horse to balance on his hind end so you are developing muscling that will improve your dressage work. The hill also give you the opportunity to safely let your horse out - if your horse becomes strong, the hill will do the regulating instead creating an argument. Above all... have fun!

CAJumper
Oct. 1, 2007, 11:39 AM
Yes, we definitely gallop. It's fun, and good exercise.

To address the fitness issue, I think it's more a matter of keeping the horse as fit as he can be and *still be ridable* by his owner. I do think any horse's performance will benefit with increased cardiovascular AND muscular fitness. The problem arises when the horse become so CV fit that the rider can no longer handle him/her. Certainly this isn't the case with all horses, particularly those who are well-trained and mild-mannered by nature. I am certainly cautious with youngsters that they do not get too fit - a tired baby horse is often a good baby horse (if you know when to call it a day, of course!). ;) However, for all other horses I like to get them as fit as I can manage. IMO, that's when good performances become brilliant.

(Caveat - I am a jumper rider who dabbles in dressage, as the screen name suggests!)

Mozart
Oct. 1, 2007, 12:06 PM
we can find a safe place to do it. And that is getting harder and harder.

LD1129
Oct. 1, 2007, 12:20 PM
I usually try to go out once a week to hack across the street from the farm in the big fields. My boy loves to gallop up hills :yes: My trainer likes us to incorporate some hill work into our training.

AnotherRound
Oct. 2, 2007, 08:28 AM
Unfortunately, I think for alot of dressage riders (lower level ammies at least) the question is can you gallop your horse, can you let him/her out and bring him/her back? Can you control the horse after a full out gallop?

That's an unfortunate question. I feel sorry for someone who has to ask it.

After a full out gallop, the horses are only too happy to come back and settle down a bit. They are blowing, after its done, you know. They are also happy, and happy horses are cooperative horses. You, of course, have to gallop with them. They'll think you're their buddy. They'll like you.

I've always had ex-racers. Nothing like galloping a horse full out. I have never galloped a horse which wouldn't come back. If he doesn't, urge him on! Keep him going. He's gotta get tired at some point.

If you want to gallop, and are slightly concerned, find a nice dirt road in the State park, and choose a nice long uphill. You can trailer to the parks once a month, at least. Give him a buddy to race, and by the time you get to the top, he'll come back nicely, and you won't feel so out of control, going uphill. And he'll be delighted. And you'll say, now what was the fuss all about. And your exhilleration will last for a long, long time.

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 08:47 AM
Thomas - the average DQ here would be afraid to leave the ring let alone actually gallop! Do I presume you're joking ??

Or ......

do I presume you're not talking about "real" dressage riders. Rather you're talking about the sort of person that owns a hobby horse and does nothing other that potter about an enclosed arena all day every day and because they can't, daren't or won't do anything else. They do endless mindblowingly tedious "schooling" which the horse neither needs or requires but it suits the rider and every now and then they enter a low level dressage competition just for a change of venue but still within the confines of an arena?


Hunting my dressage horse 3 times a week (field mastering) never hurt her dressage performance or concentration. Absolutely correct and indeed when my friend and neighbour Lady Elizabeth Joicey (patron of the UK Dressage Federation) was alive and well I regularly hunted with her on her grand prix horses, Powder Monkey, Mester Mouse or Appin Star. Likewise another friend and neighbour, Sylvia Loch regularly hunts her lusitano schoolmasters.

If a "dressage queen" can't or won't take a horse out for a gallop she's no "queen" and is more of a frog than a princess in my book

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 09:32 AM
or even hand gallop down That's a canter isn't it?


No doubt there are plenty of people in all disciplines who are afraid to gallop. No doubt there is. But IMO they're NOT "real" riders or horsemen or horsewomen. And they most definitely aren't "queens"


If we're riding together and I want to gallop, then I go ahead, and she holds her horse back to a canter. She isn't afraid of the horse, but she's afraid of hitting an unseen hole, or the horse taking a mistep and going down. Don't horses hit holes and go down at canter ??


Many people just don't enjoy the fear and uncertainty of racing across a hay field not knowing if there's an unseen hole or log that could end the horse and rider's career. So frightened and nervous and risk averse rider then.


I wonder how many reining trainers (who gallop in training and competition all the time), take their 150,000 dollar horses out in a hay field and let 'er rip. I would bet not many. I haven't a scooby but the horses I mentioned earlier were all worth a heck of a lot more than that!


And I don't think that has anything at all to do with being a weanie, or a pretender, or a wannabe. It has to do with wanting to protect your investment. Or perhaps its just risk aversion rather than getting proper perspective on probability!


Perhaps where you live, they have groomed galloping trails? Erm I wouldn't even know what a galloping trail was! We ride out in open countryside.


In my state, we have pea graveled railroad beds that you can gallop on, but the footing is extremely hard and it's very hard on the joints. And obviously you don't (or shouldn't!) canter or gallop a horse on hard metalled roads or on gravel! Makes no difference whether its a dressage horse or a happy hack!


I have yet to feel one of my horses truly open up on a railroad bed because the footing just isn't inviting. Just goes to prove that some horses aren't stupid and know how to look after themselves and in so doing, they look after their rider.

lizathenag
Oct. 2, 2007, 10:16 AM
Folks have horses for different reasons in different times of their lives. I believe it is important not to put down folks who do things differently than I might as long as they are safe and not causing injury. It really doesn't matter to me that some of the people I board with only lead their horses around.

I am recovering from a shattered ankle and although I have galloped polo ponies in my youth, I am now quite content to be trotting in the open. Not everyone is lucky enough to have been able to skip school as a high school student to go hunting with their teachers as I did.

Red Barn
Oct. 2, 2007, 10:29 AM
Do I presume you're joking ??

Or ......

do I presume you're not talking about "real" dressage riders. Rather you're talking about the sort of person that owns a hobby horse and does nothing other that potter about an enclosed arena all day every day and because they can't, daren't or won't do anything else. They do endless mindblowingly tedious "schooling" which the horse neither needs or requires but it suits the rider and every now and then they enter a low level dressage competition just for a change of venue but still within the confines of an arena?


And have you ever noticed how many people like this then complain that their horse is "lazy" or "lacks forwardness" or is "behind the leg" or really, REALLY needs those foot-long electric spurs?

A coincidence, no doubt.

Mozart
Oct. 2, 2007, 10:50 AM
Why do those who do things one way feel the need to denigrate others that don't? (yes, Thomas I am talking to you). Surely such behaviour is beneath you. Some people like to gallop (I happen to be one) some don't. Why must you get on a high horse about it? Some people, particularly in populated parts of the US, practically keep horses in suburbia. Good luck even finding a safe place to ride out the ring, never mind gallop. You cannot look at your experiences, location and background and assume all others must do as you do or they are pathetic and useless.

Lisa Cook
Oct. 2, 2007, 10:59 AM
Just 'cause, I thought it would be fun to add pictures.

Galloping. (in the snow, with a western saddle while pulling a skier, no less!)
Dressage. :)

Same pony.

Anyone else with pictures?

Mozart
Oct. 2, 2007, 11:02 AM
Very cool. Who was having more fun, you, the pony or the skier?

Lisa Cook
Oct. 2, 2007, 11:11 AM
Mozart - that is a tough question! :lol:

The skier was having a blast, as well, so I think we would have to call it a tie.

2 weeks, one body clip, and a bath later, this pony traveled to Aiken, SC and ribboned in an event. :) Versatile girl that she is.

mp
Oct. 2, 2007, 11:41 AM
Neat pics, Lisa. What an awesome pony. :)

One of most fun things I do with my horse is barrel race and run poles on him at our barn's little gymkana (breeches, tall boots, dressage saddle and all). We don't win anything -- our barrel turns are based on spiraling down at the canter. Quite stylish, but not the turn 'n' burn stuff real can chasers do. But he loves the all-out race for the finish line. (His mama raced in Poland.)

So now we fly whenever there's an opportunity. Blows out the cobwebs for both of us, and it's helped me with canter work.

I can understand why some riders aren't comfortable asking for everything the horse has got. And I still consider them "real" riders. I've had my horse since he was born, and been riding him for almost 4 years now. I know he's got brakes and isn't hiding any evil tricks (hasn't revealed them yet anyway ;)) He's also a little Arabian squirt. I'd probably be a little more cautious if I didn't know him so very well and he were 17h instead of 15h.

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 11:49 AM
Why do those who do things one way feel the need to denigrate others that don't? (yes, Thomas I am talking to you). I presume that denigrate means something different over there.

Where precisely did you think I did that?


Some people like to gallop (I happen to be one) some don't. You don't say, no sh** Sherlock!


Why must you get on a high horse about it? And clearly high horse means something different there. It makes absolutely NO difference to me whether folks like to gallop or not or are risk averse or nervous. But don't try to persuade me they're competitive riders or "queens" of the sport.


Some people, particularly in populated parts of the US, practically keep horses in suburbia. Good luck even finding a safe place to ride out the ring, never mind gallop. You cannot look at your experiences, location and background and assume all others must do as you do or they are pathetic and useless. Your words, not mine. Not even in my thoughts!! And the chip is on your shoulder, not mine!

Mozart
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:00 PM
If a "dressage queen" can't or won't take a horse out for a gallop she's no "queen" and is more of a frog than a princess in my book

So you mean "frog" in the positive sense then. Ah, I see. Yes, I like frogs too. Cute little amphibians that they are.

lyssap39
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:05 PM
I would think that all galloping your horse could do is help to make them strnger. Especially if you are out and working up and down hills to help work on muscles that are needed very much in the dressage ring. I love working my horses out of the ring, it helps them to stay on their toes and makes things more fun. Plus, most places that I have ever gone to show (I event usually) don't have fenced in warmup arenas...so if you are working outside of the fence already, your horse would be prepared for this and not as upset if they didn't know what was going on.

Just my opinion

Lisa Cook
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:05 PM
I do think that dressage, by its very nature, attracts a lot of folks who fall strongly onto the risk-averse side of the adrenaline scale. And that's cool. I don't think someone is a "frog", or any less of a horseman, because they don't find any appeal in the idea of galloping their horse.

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:11 PM
So you mean "frog" in the positive sense then. Ah, I see. Yes, I like frogs too. Cute little amphibians that they are. You perhaps don't know the story of kissing frogs to see which one turns into royalty.

SarMoniet
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:11 PM
Norman finds such things (galloping) to be a punishment. I'm lucky if I can get a good medium canter out of him most days. I think I've felt him kick up into an actual gallop once, while playing around in an empty pasture.

For the most part, though, I don't feel as though we have a safe area to let loose and go. He's clumsy as hell and all we have is rutty & holey pastures. He trips while walking (lazy sod) and honestly I just don't feel like taking the chance at running him around out there anymore.

Back in his prime, a ride on Sar wasn't complete without a good gallop. He & I both lived to run. His legs aren't quite so trustworthy anymore, though (he's 27) and now I check him back at the canter. We've gone down twice and I just am not willing to take any more chances. I do miss that feeling of flying with him, though. He had this smooth as silk flat out gallop that just floated along.

akor
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:12 PM
I don't care if you gallop or not, but don't imply that it's the #1 danger to horse and human out there. (Re aventura's comments)

I would gallop and gallop and gallop if I could.

In the 1970s, horses worth 65K+ were galloped. And jumped. That's a pretty penny in today's $. Hardly any horses stayed in arenas.

Things have changed. But, not everywhere and not for everyone.

Heinz 57
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:15 PM
(Eventer..)

I think what gets some people about galloping is that bringing the horse back down isn't an INSTANT thing. Its not like going from the canter to the trot, or even working-lengthen-working canter. The same way you build the stride UP to/in the gallop, you must let it come back down. If you're galloping along and get scared, you can't just yell whoa and instantly be going along at a medium trot. You still have to keep control of your horse and bring it back down.

Every once in a while we'll go around for a nice gallop. Not a complete blow out, but only for two reasons: first, he was a successful racehorse. Second, he has a chip in his knee and that combined with the first reason means he's likely to make himself sore if I let him all the way out. He is SUPER fun to gallop though...very adjustable.

I've never had a problem with my horse being 'too fit'. He has days where he's full of sh**, but thats generally when I skip a couple days and then I'd EXPECT him to be a little on the energetic side. Furthermore, I sincerely doubt that taking your horse out for a gallop even once a week is going to make him 'too fit' if there were such a thing. The 'too fit' debate has been going on in the eventing world for a long time.

CatOnLap
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:16 PM
Dear thomas.
"Dressage Queen" is an insult on this side of the pond. Refers to riders who "think they're all that with a side of fries" but are afraid to do many things, including, warm up their own horses at shows...
Galloping would mean to them, that they have utterly lost control of their horse.

Me? My horse will not put up with endless arena schooling. He makes it more "interesting" if we don't do other things in between.
But at nearly 1700 lbs, galloping that one is a little frightening. I mean, the expansion of the ribs as he moves into gallop from canter, is enough to pop me off the horse! And I usually run out of field before I run out of horse. And in one of my past incarnations, I did rehab TB's and am not averse to galloping anything under 16.3 hh.
No matter. I put a stirrup leather around his neck, and hang on for dear life. Because he loves it. He loves racing the 16 hh TB we go out with, even though he never wins. And it makes for a walk on a loose rein home, not a piaffe.

PS I also walked the field very carefully and marked out a safe straight line with no holes first.

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:16 PM
So according to you Thomas, it's impossible for a person to be a competitive dressage rider if they don't gallop their horses in the wide open expanses?

Hmm, interesting. :lol:
Your logic is the art of going wrong with conviction and every confidence!

Your imagination on the other hand knows no bounds

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:31 PM
Dear thomas.
"Dressage Queen" is an insult on this side of the pond. Refers to riders who "think they're all that with a side of fries" but are afraid to do many things, including, warm up their own horses at shows...
Galloping would mean to them, that they have utterly lost control of their horse..Thanks for that explanation. My Yard Manager has just told me precisely the same....

And she's also let me have this to help me better understand....

How do you get your quadrille team to ride their figures in perfect synchrony?
Shoot all but one of them.

What do dressage riders use for contraceptives?
Their personalities.

How can you tell if an arena is level?
The drool comes out of both sides of the rider’s mouth.

How do you tell when a dressage rider is dead?
The wine bottle is still full.

How many dressage riders does it take to change a light bulb?
Just one, but he’ll go through the entire box of light bulbs to find the one that fits the best.

How many quadrille riders does it take to change a light bulb?
“Don’t worry about the change. We’ll fake it.”

How many Dressage Queens does it take to change a light bulb?
One. She holds the light bulb and the world revolves around her.

What’s the difference between a Dressage Queen and a piranha?
The top hat and lipstick.

How do you tell when a Dressage Queen is dead?
She’s still stiff as a board, but her horse looks happy.


Me? My horse will not put up with endless arena schooling. He makes it more "interesting" if we don't do other things in between. Sounds like a horse with opinions and attitude and my personal preference


But at nearly 1700 lbs, galloping that one is a little frightening. I mean, the expansion of the ribs as he moves into gallop from canter, is enough to pop me off the horse! And I usually run out of field before I run out of horse. My wife's young heavy hunter - Cleveland Bay x with a limousin bull?! is 18 hands. She says its like driving a heavy goods vehicle and you need a lot of distance to get him from 0 to top speed and a large braking distance!

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa178/classic-carriages/DSCF0049.jpg

No matter. I put a stirrup leather around his neck, and hang on for dear life. We ordinarily have neck straps on ours

Mozart
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:34 PM
You perhaps don't know the story of kissing frogs to see which one turns into royalty.

Does that work in vice versa too? :lol:

Auventera Two
Oct. 2, 2007, 12:35 PM
I don't care if you gallop or not, but don't imply that it's the #1 danger to horse and human out there. (Re aventura's comments)

Oh no, I don't think it's the #1 most dangerous thing at all. But it sure can be more risky than a nice canter in the outdoor ring. I think some people just don't like the thought of their horse stepping in a hole or tripping on something that they can't see. I've never had any such thing happen to me but it's possible. Some people just might not like doing it, and I think that's perfectly okay.

CatOnLap
Oct. 2, 2007, 01:11 PM
My wife's young heavy hunter - Cleveland Bay x with a limousin bull?! is 18 hands. She says its like driving a heavy goods vehicle and you need a lot of distance to get him from 0 to top speed and a large braking distance!

your wife's horse and mine are probably twins separated at birth. Mine is hanoverian x moose.
but all that dressage practice has made him explode from walk to gallop...we do get wonderful extended canter down a long side- but can only fit in 5 strides before the corner...

and he loves quadrille. especially the part where he gets fed up with horses riding up his butt and scatters the entire ride hither and yon with a single look.
:cool:

lizathenag
Oct. 2, 2007, 01:12 PM
I do think that dressage, by its very nature, attracts a lot of folks who fall strongly onto the risk-averse side of the adrenaline scale.


I once heard that dressage is for those who have done everything else! (or can't do anything else).

and Thomas, you forgot one.

What is the difference between the DQ and the puppy?

The puppy eventually will stop whining!

but I digress.

Thomas_1
Oct. 2, 2007, 02:59 PM
and Thomas, you forgot one.

What is the difference between the DQ and the puppy?

The puppy eventually will stop whining!

but I digress. :lol::lol:


your wife's horse and mine are probably twins separated at birth. Mine is hanoverian x moose.mmm interesting cross breed. I'm pretty certain my ones mother was never near a moose, though the head is VERY similar!

My one's backside is definitely just like a limousin bull though..... the horse I mean, not Susan :winkgrin:

ltw
Oct. 2, 2007, 10:58 PM
I love to gallop but not in the ring, too small. I love to gallop in the 400 acre field that is perfect. Just one problem, it has not rained in 6 months and the ground is cement. So, rather than suffer a coffin bone fracture we walk in the field and wait for rain while we do real work in the ring.

SBrentnall
Oct. 3, 2007, 12:04 AM
I would love to gallop, but here in Los Angeles there aren't very many places to do it. I could haul out to a galloping track, assuming I could persuade the owner to let me use it (CA can be very litigious and people don't generally let you ride on their land). There are some parks I can haul to, but the ground is generally EXTREMELY hard, since it only rains 6-7" per year. There are narrow mountain trails with drops off to the side, or there's Griffith park where you share the trails with mountain bikers, hikers and strings of rental horses ridden by yahoos with no brakes or steering. I galloped all the time when I lived in the UK, but it's harder here.