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twohotponies
Sep. 7, 2007, 07:38 PM
At a small competition clinic that my barn held recently, a local trainer was literally schooling her student through the whole test. You know, saying way more than what was on the sheet. The judge let the girl ride the whole thing and then told the trainer that she couldn't coach during the test and praise for her student needed to be made outside of the ring, she was very loud in her "good girls" immediately after the final halt. Anyway, the trainer proceeded to yell back at the judge that "General Burton says..." I didn't catch exactly what General Burton has to say in the matter because I was pretty surprised by the trainer's attitude and lack of decorum.? She was very aggressive in her assertations.

I have done a google search but haven't come up with anything on his training ideas or techniques. This trainer is a fervent follower and I always am interested in different ideas. So, just looking for some enlightenment.:)

see u at x
Sep. 7, 2007, 07:55 PM
He was my barn manager's dressage instructor, too. She adores him and thinks he is brilliant. I own his book "How to Ride a Winning Dressage Test" and tend to agree with her. :) She has video of him riding her event horse around our indoor arena getting so much out of her horse. He's also an S level judge, I believe...

It seems that a lot of riders/instructors around here were taught by military riders like General Burton. I've run into several of them, and boy, they don't make it easy on you. They got no breaks from THEIR instructors, so they tend to be extra tough. I had an "unofficial" lesson one day from a woman who was coached by them, and she kept me going without a break until I literally threw up on the horse and almost passed out from heat exhaustion.

http://useventing.com/hof/index.php?id=1

http://www.horsesdaily.com/news/dressage/bios/officials/general_burton.html

http://www.virginiahorse.com/articles/2001/06_dreams-dollars-devotees-make-virginia-tops-for-eventing.jsp

http://www.vahistory.org/horse_film/video.html

And a link to his book on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Ride-Winning-Dressage-Step-Step/dp/0395382173

I think the book is great. The tests may be old, but the advice and instruction is timeless. He breaks every single movement down so it is easy to understand. I was able to find my copy online basically brand new and in perfect condition.

tarragon
Sep. 7, 2007, 07:56 PM
http://useventing.com/hof/index.php?id=1

JSwan
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:13 PM
I don't know the man - but I did spill my lasagna all over him once. We had a terrific chat over lunch at a 3-day at Morven Park years ago.

I didn't get the impression he would approve of trainers coaching their students in competition and arguing and/or challenging judges. This isn't a hockey game, after all.

see u at x
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:18 PM
I don't know the man - but I did spill my lasagna all over him once. We had a terrific chat over lunch at a 3-day at Morven Park years ago.

I didn't get the impression he would approve of trainers coaching their students in competition and arguing and/or challenging judges. This isn't a hockey game, after all.

I tend to think you are right. From what my BM says, he's an incredibly nice and kind man. A firm, solid instructor, but a nice man who would never behave rudely like that towards a fellow judge.

karin o
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:19 PM
Stay tuned for an intimate video about General Burton brought to you by the Dressage Foundation, produced by Mary Phelps. Its enlightening and fun to watch and learn about his amazing contributions to our equestrian world. I believe it will premiere at the USDF convention this winter.

see u at x
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:21 PM
Karin, will we be able to purchase a copy when it comes out? I'm thinking this would be a great gift for some people... :)

hoopoe
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:22 PM
I have had the honor of sitting with Major Gen Burton many times and he is unfailingly a gentleman and a superb horseman.

He would never put up with someone behaving as the "trainer" did at the schooling show.

He is keenly enthusiastic over nice horses and riders, gives back to the equestrian community extensively and always spot on in my tests with comments , scores and encouraging attitude.

I highly doubt that any behaviors you witnessed by the person has anything to do with Major Gen Burton.

ToN Farm
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:36 PM
http://www.vahistory.org/horse_film/image.php?file_id=57

Just look at the beautiful following hand!

slc2
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:42 PM
General Burton is old school.

No, he wouldn't approve of someone breaking the rules. But he'd tell them they were disqualified in a gentlemanly way.

They don't make them like that any more.

petitefilly
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:47 PM
http://www.vahistory.org/horse_film/image.php?file_id=57

Just look at the beautiful following hand!

Thanks for that post! BTW. Burton is what we call an *Icon*. He is the best.

~Equestrian Selections~
www.divadesigns.biz

lizathenag
Sep. 7, 2007, 08:48 PM
He judged my dressage at my first pony club national rally (I think it was the one at Ledyard in 1970?).

anyway, my horse got his feet tangled up in the dressage chains and at one point or another got all four feet out of the arena.

he was very nice and told me my test had been quite nice until then.

oh well.

Carol Ames
Sep. 7, 2007, 11:38 PM
a graduate of the Cavalry school at Ft. Riley :yes:also, one of our first Olympians; in the early days of the USET; He is also in one o fthe Halls of Fame, eventing , or USET;)

EssentialEQST
Sep. 8, 2007, 12:03 AM
General Burton and Dr. Chopra will be the judges at the Windy Knoll Fall show the end of September.

Dressage Art
Sep. 8, 2007, 12:26 AM
General Burton is a legend, he is pushing 90 years old and still actively judging dressage shows.

DownYonder
Sep. 8, 2007, 05:50 AM
I once saw Gen. Burton disqualify a kid from a championship class because he had watched the kid's trainer school her horse just before entering the ring. I was ring steward, and the trainer was riding the horse just outside of the ring near "A". With about 2 minutes to go before the bell, she slid off the horse and put the kid on. Kid goes in the ring, he lets her ride the test, then calls her over and tells her she is disqualified. Kid bursts into tears, trainer pitches a fit and argues with him, saying that since it was a kid, he should give her a break. He sticks to his guns and the disqualification held.

On another note, he is judging next weekend at the Southern Hospitality Breeders Classic II in Conyers, GA.

QLD
Sep. 8, 2007, 06:59 AM
Good for him for sticking to the rules. Otherwise, a few years down the road, it will be..."She's just an ammy"...as she dons her rhinestone tiara to trot down the centerline after Herr Haagendaaz warms her 800 bazooblio dollar horse up for the South Beach CDI...

But he's awesome. Very kind to the horses. He taught one of the first clinics I ever rode in. He also drags one heck of a centerline...by hand. I wish he did more judging around me, but mostly you see him at events around here.

rebecca yount
Sep. 8, 2007, 08:06 AM
I know General Burton and have been judged by him and attended UDSF conferences with him many times. I am aware of his skills and history as well as his current writing and activities. The judge/clinician in the OP's example (she said it was a clinic--I guess with test-riding included) seems to have been correct if the trainer was "coaching" throughout the test.

Coaching DURING the test is clearly against the rules. ANYTHING done DURING THE TEST to assist the rider is not allowed. However, before the entry at A and AFTER FINAL SALUTE, the test is NOT judged. DR122 deals with Execution and Judging of Tests.

DR122-7-h: A test begins with the entry at A and ends after the final salute, as soon as the horse moves forward...Except for leaving the arena as described above in 7g, and for non-permitted movements shown in a freestyle test, anything before the beginning or after the end of the test has no effect on the marks.

DR122-10: 10. Unauthorized Assistance is forbidden under penalty of elimination. Any intervention by a third party with the object of facilitating the task of the competitor, including voice, signals, etc., is considered illegal assistance. A member of the Jury may not discuss a ride with a competitor before the bell or after the final salute.

Now, in the example the OP gave, it sounds like the the trainer did things to facilitate the task of the competitor DURING THE TEST. Because DR122 ALL deals with Execution and Judging of Tests (and the TEST includes everything after she entered and A and BEFORE the final salute), then the person should have been disqualified. But praising her after she saluted by saying "good girl" is NOT forbidden and should not be penalized. It's not "before they leave the ring" but instead "before the test ends", which is at the final salute. If the sole reason the rider was eliminated was for the help BEFORE and AFTER the test, then the judge was wrong. It's only DURING the test that you can't receive assistance. In this case, though, it sounds like the trainer "coached" all through the test. One is only allowed to READ what's on the test sheet. And only once, except if it seems that the rider didn't hear you, and then you can read it one more time. Even emphasis on certain words, if done too obviously and too much, could be considered unauthorized assistance.

I am particularly aware about this rule because I was once talked to by a judge (not General Burton but another, now-retired and I think deceased military retiree) (not allowed--discussing test by member of jury) to be admonished for saying something to my reader (about a B-52-sized horse fly on my horse's neck that I killed during the free walk) as I left the arena on a long rein. He said he could have eliminated me (not true) but that was incorrect because what I did was after the salute.

Could it have been that the trainer, in mentioning General Burton's name, was talking about what she did after the salute, and saying something to the effect of "General Burton says it's fine to say 'Good job' AFTER the salute?"

I can find nothing in the rules that says it's not allowed, by the way, for someone else to warm up a horse, except in some championship classes (which is what the above poster, not the OP, was referring to). In certain championship classes which have additional rules in addition to USEF rules, it IS ONLY allowed for the entered competitor to ride the horse on the show grounds except for a groom on a long rein). It's not considered necessarily good sportsmanship in other competitions, but if the trainer were properly credentialed by USEF, has signed a release as "Coach", and abides by other rules, I can't see where someone could be sanctioned for such behavior. But in championship classes with special rules, yes--and I am ALL FOR judges upholding the rules. Sounds like General Burton, of course, followed the rules because you said it was a championship class.

Overall, I think coaching or assistance even after thest but while still in the ring is not the best idea in the world, and I know the above is nit-picky, but if it is a scared kid I think it's okay to encourage while circling ring and after salute. I would have, as a matter of courtesy, waited until the kid was out of the ring altogether.

twohotponies
Sep. 8, 2007, 08:53 AM
Thank you everyone! I will look for the book that was mentioned.

On a side note, this trainer also had another girl riding later in the day. Very nice girl on a very cute horse. Anyway, when she came into the arena the judge goes, "What the hell?!" She called the girl over and of course her trainer came also, they had a rope halter on under the bridle. They said they had been lunging the horse before the test. Why they didn't just take off the halter when they put on the bridle is a mystery never to be solved. The judge was going to disqualify them, the trainer started yelling again, the poor girl was getting really embarassed. In the end, since the halter wasn't interfering with the bridle the judge let it slide since it was a show/clinic. I think she felt sorry for the girl. I know I did. She rode a nice test too.

AllWeatherGal
Sep. 8, 2007, 12:19 PM
I love threads like these :) Gen. Burton deserves to be known about and celebrated!!!!

fargonefarm
Sep. 8, 2007, 01:52 PM
I think Gen. Burton is one of the finest judges and horsemen in the country. My trainer is good friends with him and while riding for Gen. Burton makes me break out in hives, I truly respect him. He always loved my mare but didn't like my gelding. Funny, I feel the same way:lol:

karin o
Sep. 8, 2007, 04:51 PM
They will definitely make this video available to everyone. Thanks for all the great stories. Maybe more readers will share theirs !

slc2
Sep. 9, 2007, 09:38 AM
ooops

Touchstone Farm
Sep. 9, 2007, 09:11 PM
What is with trainers who don't know the rules?! A few weeks ago at a show, a girl was riding and taking her time to go around the ring, the judge warned her she only had a few seconds to enter at "A". She was late, but being a kid, the judge let it go. The whole time, the trainer (and I use that term loosely) was yelling instructions. The kid ended her test, the judge called her over and told her that her coach should not be yelling instructions to her or she could get eliminated and reminds her how long she has to get in the ring after the bell rings. "Trainer" hears all this. Kid comes later for another test, takes too long to go around, judge warns her, she continues toddling around, doesn't get in in time, judge eliminates her. "Trainer" gets obnoxious. Why do people pay their hard-earned money for "trainers" who are clueless???

Now, back on topic. Major General Jonathan Burton. What can one say? Respect! What he acomplished in his lifetime many can only accomplishe the same in their dreams! I hope I am going as strong as he is at his age!

Sandy M
Sep. 11, 2007, 11:23 AM
General Burton is old school.

No, he wouldn't approve of someone breaking the rules. But he'd tell them they were disqualified in a gentlemanly way.

They don't make them like that any more.

So old school that I once hear him say to a junior rider, "I will NEVER score a palomino higher than 55%."

Still, his skills are not to be denied.

Dressage62
Sep. 11, 2007, 01:40 PM
At the Morven Park horse trials a rider really struggled to get her horse to do the the dressage test for Advanced, so after the test he says, "You need to tranquillize this horse!"

Dressage Art
Sep. 11, 2007, 03:15 PM
So old school that I once hear him say to a junior rider, "I will NEVER score a palomino higher than 55%."

Still, his skills are not to be denied.

As I said earlier, he is a legend and he is pushing 90 years old. Yes, he loves to talk breeds with riders after their test - and it is against the current rules.

Mudroom
Sep. 11, 2007, 03:25 PM
I agree, he is very knowledgeable and everything is black and white, nothing in the grey zone.

If you are riding for him be prepared to get in the ring very promptly. He takes very little time to finish up the test of the previous rider and ring the bell or whatever.

slc2
Sep. 11, 2007, 03:38 PM
"I would never score a palomino more than 55%"

may i suggest that this remark may have been made in a...dare we say it...joking fashion?

my friend got a 62 percent on her old very palomino, very quarter horse. from general burton.

slp2
Sep. 11, 2007, 09:01 PM
I have ridden under him quite a few times. He is always spot on with his comments. But he also likes to talk to you about your horse after the test. He was one of the judges at the AEC's for my test. After my halt he had all kinds of questions about my horse (starting with "What breed is she?" . . . . ) I also think about all the years he has been riding and judging, he must have some amazing observations about how dressage has evolved in this country spanning the last 60 years. It would be neat to pick his brain about it. :yes:

And yes, I would hazard to guess that the "palomino comment" was made in jest!

Carol Ames
Sep. 11, 2007, 09:38 PM
I've been fortunate to "hang out on the rail " with many of the oldtime horsemen, Col. Thack, Capt. Jack , and Col. Wimert;) , as well as Col. Lundquist; What a wealth of information there!The last time I was at Rolex, I stood beside Denny, between Jack Fritz on one side, Mark Phillips and Jimmy wofford on the:eek: other; Can you inagine how much I learned just standing there and "soaking it in ?" You're right "they don't make them like that anymore " why, because the there is little to no demand :sadsmile:for real "horsemen, despite what GM and others say; The people in the most sought after positions are happy in their ignorance:no:, and, if someone comes along who knows about shoeing, biomechanics of horse and rider , or any one of a myriad of subjects these horsemen of Ft. Riley know, they feel threatened :yes:; unfortunately there is no room "at the top "unless they know someway to stroke the ego of the wealthy owners:mad:; sorry about the" rant" as you might imagine I've witnessed this first hand:cry::mad::o

paintgirl
Sep. 12, 2007, 04:26 PM
I have recieved scores higher than 60% from Gen. Burton on a palomino qh AT SEVERAL EVENTS IN THE 80'S.

paintgirl
Sep. 12, 2007, 04:32 PM
Sorry- I hit the caps lock button is the above post by mistake!

Sandy M
Sep. 12, 2007, 04:50 PM
"I would never score a palomino more than 55%"

may i suggest that this remark may have been made in a...dare we say it...joking fashion?

my friend got a 62 percent on her old very palomino, very quarter horse. from general burton.

Maybe he's mellowed. This was some time ago (circa 1977-79). It was a VERY nice 16.2 Palomino Appendix QH, being ridden 2nd level by an "A" level Pony Clubber who generally scored between 65% - 73% on the horse at that level, including at the year end championships, both junior and open. If it hadn't been Palomino (an unusual color for dressage shows then), it could have easily been mistaken for a TB or a WBXTB. She did her usually creditable job and got..... 55%. There was only one other horse in the class, TBXWestfalen, mediocre mover, inaccurate and sometimes disobedient test - 61%. I remember only because she was a great kid and I was really surprised at the score. Interestingly enough, I will admit I do NOT recall him scoring low my trainer on HER Palomino - but she was well known to him, the horse was 17.2, she was a noted professional............

Sandy M
Sep. 12, 2007, 04:52 PM
I have ridden under him quite a few times. He is always spot on with his comments. But he also likes to talk to you about your horse after the test. He was one of the judges at the AEC's for my test. After my halt he had all kinds of questions about my horse (starting with "What breed is she?" . . . . ) I also think about all the years he has been riding and judging, he must have some amazing observations about how dressage has evolved in this country spanning the last 60 years. It would be neat to pick his brain about it. :yes:

And yes, I would hazard to guess that the "palomino comment" was made in jest!

The late Victor Hugo-Vidal was a big chatter up too. However, he never asked me what breed my horse was. Maybe it was the spots that gave it away......LOL

I don't think Burton was joking - but maybe it was a "bad judge" day for him.

EqTrainer
Sep. 12, 2007, 04:56 PM
At the Morven Park horse trials a rider really struggled to get her horse to do the the dressage test for Advanced, so after the test he says, "You need to tranquillize this horse!"

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

(laughing so hard I am gasping for oxygen)

Those old guys are not afraid to call 'em like they see 'em!

monstrpony
Sep. 12, 2007, 05:12 PM
Many years ago, Gen. Burton came to do a clinic in our area. It was a very neat experience, I was in a group with several of my eventing buddies, some of whom had all gotten started at about the same time and had come a good way in our knowledge and ability, along with a couple of talented younger riders. He had us doing some of those grids of six bounces, no stirrups, no reins, hands climbing up a rope. I'd never actually done that kind of thing before, but my good mare did it quite well.

We had lots of fun, we all improved without realizing it, and we all had a sense of having been tested and of passing at a level we didn't realize we were capable of. One of my very favorite clinic memories.

poltroon
Sep. 13, 2007, 05:55 PM
I scribed for him once at LAEC, and it was a wonderful experience. I would be thrilled to show under him or clinic with him.

Definitely old school, definitely would not tolerate a trainer coaching through a test.

RunForIt
Sep. 17, 2007, 09:03 PM
:) Bring him Snickers, and he will LOVE you! :cool:

Dressage Art
Sep. 17, 2007, 09:20 PM
:) Bring him Snickers, and he will LOVE you! :cool: you forgot the milk ;) he loooves a cold milk while judging!

Gallop On
Sep. 18, 2007, 12:46 PM
This is how much respect he generates, and just how funny he can be. A few years ago my friend (don't shoot me if you are reading this!) was riding at Morven on a little but very powerful horse - he was 3-day fit for the 1st time in his life, and looked the part. She is a very tall girl, and quite athletic. Anyway, he walked up to her and commented, "I think you need to feed the horse ... and starve the rider!" She took his comment quite seriously, because the next time I saw her she was at least 20 lbs lighter....

DownYonder
Sep. 18, 2007, 02:52 PM
I had the honor and pleasure of spending some time with General Burton this past weekend at the Southern Hospitality Breeders Classic sporthorse breeding show in Conyers, GA. As we stated in our show program, he was a member of the 1948 and 1956 Olympic Equestrian Teams, and has judged internationally at the Olympic Games, the Pan American Games, and in the U.S., Europe, South America, Central America, Australia, and New Zealand. He is 87 years old and a retired Army Major General who served this country honorably for 33 years, including during WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. He just lost his wife of 60 years last February and will soon be moving from a retirement community for retired military personnel near Mount Vernon, VA, to live with his daughter in Tuscon, AZ.

I spoke with him for a few minutes in the lobby of the hotel as he was checking in, went to dinner with him, and chauffered him to the show in the morning. He is quite an interesting guy. During dinner, he talked to us a bit about the old Army remount program, and also regaled us with tales of his adventures riding in the Olympics – including describing how he and his horse both landed on their heads after an 11’ drop from one of the last fences. He said he was knocked silly, but someone put him back on his horse and they managed to finish the 1000 meter gallop at the end of the course (the old “phase E”). He was then whisked off to the hospital, where they determined he had a concussion and wouldn’t let him ride the next day, so he couldn’t finish.

It was fun watching him judge. He looked very dapper, wore a sport coat with tie and hat all day long, and would hook his thumbs in his belt as he peered at each horse. He scared us to death, because he would walk around very close to the horses, including getting right behind them to look at their hind end conformation. He also insisted on trying to put neck sashes on the winners - we finally convinced him to let someone else do the sashes after a fractious foal nearly knocked him down. Our show manager was terrified he was going to get kicked “on her watch”. :lol:

And regarding the palomino thing – we didn’t have any palominos at our show, but he pinned an Appaloosa-colored APSR cross yearling colt first in his class over 5 very nice WB foals – including the reserve champion colt from the previous day. :D

Foxtrot's
Sep. 18, 2007, 04:35 PM
In my old eventing days it was a highlight to be judged by General Burton and also Jack Le Geoff. It raised the profile of the event. Loved them both. Very personable at the after-parties.

magnum
Sep. 18, 2007, 10:30 PM
I have also worked with him several times as a scribe. Also been judged by him, and since I ride IFV (in FRONT of the vertical) and endeavor to allow my horses to be freed up to USE their backs and SWING them .. and I also study my figures to death ... he always scores me higher. .. he is Another one who WILL NOT TOLERATE A CRANKED IN NECK AND NOSE (THANK GOD FOR THAT!).

He is in Ohio frequently ... I am sorry to hear he is moving to AZ and can only hope we don't lose the honor of his presence.

I can't add much more to what has already been said, except he is NOT in favor of overweight riders, as implied above. I have heard him mention similar comments ... sorry, in a hysterically funny manner, might I add ....

The sad thing we will lose when the old guard changes is stuff like this ... he would watch a horse approaching to present to the ring ... and from AFAR, say things like, "Oh, you watch this one. He's going to do THIS ..." He mentioned things I had NO CLUE how he could know. Things like "Oh, this is the type of horse who will start out well, but fall apart in the second half of the test."

And, sure enough, he'd NAIL IT.

I will ALWAYS remember one comment by him, also greatly valued. One horse came to trot around the outside and he said, "Oh, no. Another horse who hasn't known life without draw reins. Hey, watch what he does when he figures out his head is free for the first time in 6 months - this'll be FUN."

Sure enough, he nailed that one, too. Once the horse figured out his head was FREE for a change, he went in to star gazing mode and the rider pretty much gave up and just chose to "survive" the rest of her test with no protests and no corrections towards the horse. She left with the horse's head sky high... whilst her head was hanging. Her score was directly reflective of the level of correctness in the training program. :eek:

Anyway, I am dumbfounded that one person can have all of this knowledge. Able to target so correctly to such a level of DETAIL with little other than a small glimpse of a horse OFF IN THE DISTANCE.

Leave it to Major Burton :) ...

Magnum

Dressage Art
Sep. 18, 2007, 10:50 PM
he is NOT in favor of overweight riders, as implied above. I have heard him mention similar comments ... sorry, in a hysterically funny manner, might I add ....


I don’t find comments about overweight "funny". I heard numerous times that judges are NOT suppose to comment about overweight riders, but just see if they are physically fit to ride, just like skinny riders might be NOT physically fit to ride. Old skool or not - its bad manners to comment about overweight! That aspect of old skool I will not miss.

There is anohter Big Name who does sexual comments "in a hysterically funny manner" ... I don't enjoy that eather...

In the Air
Sep. 18, 2007, 11:12 PM
When I was a mere youngster, ages 8-12 he was my pen pal. I wrote him a letter once after reading an article he had written and he wrote me back a long and lovely letter. We continued to write back and forth for years. I never realized how fortunate I was to have such a pen pal... I finally met him in person when I was in my twenties and he remembered me from the letters. I am still moved by his kindness and generosity of spirit to take the time to write letters to a horse crazy kid.

magnum
Sep. 19, 2007, 03:18 PM
Air --

WHAT AN AMAZING STORY!

Thanks for sharing this wonderful tale ...

Magnum

Atheta21
Sep. 24, 2007, 11:32 PM
I am showing under him this weekend! I am excited after reading this thread. Any more helpful pointers that might squeak a point or two?

He sounds like the kind of person I would love to sit down and talk with for hours!

Windriderr
Sep. 25, 2007, 12:22 AM
I scribed for him and he liked to see VERY quiet hands and seat, good "Balance" (in horse and rider!) and a comment frequently mentioned was "Needs more stride." He is picky about the walk also, so no slugging around. Good luck in your test! And yes, be prompt to the ring and ready to go as mentioned above! ;)

ccoronios
Sep. 25, 2007, 02:11 PM
A very good friend of mine rode with him 40+ years ago. TOUGH is putting it nicely. But... (pitch pipe here).... R-E-S-P-E-C-T!!!

He knew she & I were friends; he was judging, I was videoing (weighed more than I should) - and walking from one ring to another.... "You should be running, not walking..." as we passed each other in opposite directions. From anyone else, I'd have been stunned (he was right!), but I just laughed out loud, told him he was right - and that I'd say "hi" to Lee for him!

Janet
Sep. 25, 2007, 02:15 PM
A couple of year ago he was either TD or Pres of GJ at Seneca. He was WALKING around the XC course in the heat- wouldn't use a golf cart, etc.

DownYonder
Sep. 25, 2007, 02:27 PM
I just saw on the USDF website that he will be inducted into the Roemer/USDF Hall of Fame at this year's convention in Orlando. I wish I was going so I could cheer for him.

Tiki
Sep. 25, 2007, 03:11 PM
A friend had a horse in the 5yo Young Horse Test with her trainer a few years ago. The rider wasn't really riding the horse forward and when it came time for the remarks he was called on it by Gen. Burton. The rider said, "but it's really hot". Gen. Burton said, "Well you know what? . . . . That's too bad!"

Atheta21
Sep. 25, 2007, 11:36 PM
Great, thanks windrider! I am riding a freestyle too. Does he like to judge them?

SGray
Sep. 27, 2007, 11:15 AM
on a side note - at WKF, Chopra is out - judges are Burton, Babcock, Kulifay and Kyle as I understand it

TwoArabs
Sep. 27, 2007, 11:41 AM
About 20 years ago I took a lesson from Gen. Burton. I was a green rider, riding a tough horse that I'd never ridden before. He told me I was the worst rider he'd ever instructed.

TouchstoneAcres
Sep. 29, 2007, 01:31 PM
An icon, yes. He won't be biased against a nice TB and he pinned a Lipizzan in a breed show once.

fernie fox
Sep. 29, 2007, 10:00 PM
I rode my TB mare under him many times,he loved her.Back in the 80s.

Always got great scores under him.

She was very forward and free moving.

His comments were always right on the mark.

dblitz
Sep. 29, 2007, 10:42 PM
General Burton once judged a less than stellar test during which my horse performed several airs abouve the ground. The comments were " you might want to consider joining the circus"

Funny guy!

I also scribed for him sometime later and noticed that he had an appreciation for the female form.

Janet
Oct. 7, 2007, 04:38 PM
He was the FEI steward at the Morven Park CCI* this weekend- still full of witty comments.

ESG
Oct. 7, 2007, 07:57 PM
I had the privilege of doing a clinic with Gen. Burton twenty years ago. He was very complimentary about my little App mare, and the way I rode her. I had the further privilege to scribe for him for our regional championships three years ago. It was so wonderful to see a judge who didn't cut anyone any slack, but was unfailingly courteous and polite. He's also funny as hell when you get him talking. A true icon, and a precious one. I only hope I can ride (or at least, scribe) for him again soon.

Mariequi
Oct. 12, 2007, 09:58 PM
I don't believe he'd approve of that type of coaching. He's a gentleman, military man, and has so much knowledge in his little pinky, I wish I saw him as often as I used to. He's something else.

DukesMom
Oct. 12, 2007, 10:56 PM
I rode under him recently and had a fantastic FEI ride. He gave me 3's when I deserved them and 8's when I earned them. He is NOT breed bias, he gave my boy a very high score, but he did stand up at the end of the test and ask "What kind of horse is that?" I loff my mutt.:lol:

J-Lu
Oct. 13, 2007, 12:54 AM
I rode under him recently and had a fantastic FEI ride. He gave me 3's when I deserved them and 8's when I earned them. He is NOT breed bias, he gave my boy a very high score, but he did stand up at the end of the test and ask "What kind of horse is that?" I loff my mutt.:lol:

He asked me the breeding of my horse, too, at the end of my test. And her height. I loff my height challenged horse.:D

PS. Your mutt's career trajectory is exceptional. wow.

karin o
Nov. 11, 2007, 11:58 AM
The film is nearing completion. Keep your stories on General Burton comin' ! Thanks !

Foxtrot's
Nov. 11, 2007, 12:30 PM
Does anybody know what he did when the was a General?

ideayoda
Nov. 11, 2007, 02:41 PM
Late on: http://www.229thavbn.com/1stcav/History.html

Earlier on (the pacific as well): http://useventing.com/hof/index.php?id=1

Saracatherine
Nov. 11, 2007, 08:31 PM
I have a 2nd level test from the 70's with Gen. Burton's signature on it and I will cherish it forever. It was my first time at 2nd level and he gave me a 63% with lots of constructive comments. I was so scared going in knowing he was the judge and almost scratched from nerves, but I'm so glad I went through with it as I learned so much from the experience.