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July 11, 2012

How To Survive A European Horse Shopping Trip

Horse shopping in Europe provides many lessons in cultural differences. Photo by Ivonne Wierink/Fotolia.com.
tagged in:
Humor
kstiles
2 years 7 weeks ago
Comments
Thanks for your feedback. I cringe when I recall how naive I was when I imported those first horses. You are right; the risk is tremendous. Have I been burned? Of course. The exchange rate soon... Read More
ZephyrsGarden
2 years 9 weeks ago
Europe horses
Great article. We purchased two in Europe with the aid of a trainer. One ended up being ill suited for my daughter and the other was a gem. Would I do it again, no. There are plenty of great... Read More

Comments

rideagoldenpony
2 years 13 weeks ago

Thoroughly enjoyed this!!!

Thoroughly enjoyed this!!!
mboyer3
2 years 12 weeks ago

Hilarious!

Very informative with a humorous twist! Great article!
ZephyrsGarden
2 years 9 weeks ago

Europe horses

Great article. We purchased two in Europe with the aid of a trainer. One ended up being ill suited for my daughter and the other was a gem. Would I do it again, no. There are plenty of great horses in the US and the risk is too high. Twelve years ago the euro was a good value vs the dollar, but that excuse to buy in europe is gone. But I loved reading about your exploits and what hard work it was. It sounds so romantic to go "horse shopping in europe" but the truth is it's grueling.
kstiles
2 years 7 weeks ago

Comments

Thanks for your feedback. I cringe when I recall how naive I was when I imported those first horses. You are right; the risk is tremendous. Have I been burned? Of course. The exchange rate soon became the least of my worries. I laugh when I think back to how I was calculating out decimal points and had currency trading desks on the phone trying to negotiate rates. There is still good reason to buy in Europe if you have the contacts, an unfailing eye, a big fat bank account, a certain arrogance and nerves of steel. But it must be done through an accomplished trainer, excellent vets and a trustworthy agent. The more layers you use to reduce risk, the better. Granted, the price goes up as you add. But, trust me, it's worth it given what can go wrong. If you can find good domestic-bred, great. However, if you are talking Euro-imports, the problem is that the best horses get snapped up there before they get here. Or once the horses arrive, they have so much cash slapped on them with all of the risk taken and trainers/agents involved that the price is staggering. That's why I think we "small importers" will continue to drive around the Netherlands and swill excessive amounts of caffeine and occasionally find those beautiful, high-quality creatures we all dream about!